Locaka: 12 definitions

Introduction:

Locaka means something in Hinduism, Sanskrit, Buddhism, Pali, Marathi. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

Alternative spellings of this word include Lochaka.

Languages of India and abroad

Pali-English dictionary

Source: BuddhaSasana: Concise Pali-English Dictionary

locaka : (adj.) one who pulls out or uproots.

Source: Sutta: The Pali Text Society's Pali-English Dictionary

Locaka, (adj.) (fr. Loc. Caus. of luñc; cp. Sk. luñcaka) one who pulls out D. I, 167 (kesa-massu°, habit of cert. ascetics); M. I, 308 (id.). (Page 588)

Pali book cover
context information

Pali is the language of the Tipiṭaka, which is the sacred canon of Theravāda Buddhism and contains much of the Buddha’s speech. Closeley related to Sanskrit, both languages are used interchangeably between religions.

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Marathi-English dictionary

Source: DDSA: The Molesworth Marathi and English Dictionary

lōcakā (लोचका).—m (Commonly lacakā) A piece (of flesh, dough &c.) bitten or torn off. v ghē, tōḍa, kāḍha, māra, & nigha, jā.

context information

Marathi is an Indo-European language having over 70 million native speakers people in (predominantly) Maharashtra India. Marathi, like many other Indo-Aryan languages, evolved from early forms of Prakrit, which itself is a subset of Sanskrit, one of the most ancient languages of the world.

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Sanskrit dictionary

Source: DDSA: The practical Sanskrit-English dictionary

Locaka (लोचक).—[loc-ṇvul]

1) A stupid person.

2) The pupil of the eye.

3) Lamp-black, collyrium; 'लोचको मांसपिण्डे स्यादक्षितारे च कज्जले (locako māṃsapiṇḍe syādakṣitāre ca kajjale)' इति विश्वः (iti viśvaḥ); Śiśupālavadha 4.35.

4) A kind of ear-ring.

5) A dark or blue garment.

6) A bow string.

7) A particular ornament worn by women on the forehead.

8) A lump of flesh.

9) The slough of a snake.

1) A wrinkled skin.

11) The wrinkled brow.

12) A plantain tree.

Derivable forms: locakaḥ (लोचकः).

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Shabda-Sagara Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Locaka (लोचक).—m.

(-kaḥ) 1. A ball or lump of flesh or meat. 2. The pupil of the eye. 3. Stibium or lamp-black, &c. so used. 4. An ornament, worn by women on the forehead. 5. Blue or black vesture. 6. An earring. 7. The plantain tree. 8. A bow-string. 9. A wrinkled or contracted eye-brow. 10. Folly, stupidity. 11. The rejected slough of the snake. 12. The slough of a tree. 13. Wrinkled skin. E. loc to see, ṇvul aff.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Benfey Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Locaka (लोचक).—[loc + aka], m. 1. The pupil of the eye. 2. A wrinkled or contracted eyebrow. 3. Stibium. 4. An ornament worn by women on the forehead. 5. An ear-ring. 6. The rejected slough of the snake. 7. A lump of flesh.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Monier-Williams Sanskrit-English Dictionary

1) Locaka (लोचक):—[from loc] mfn. ‘gazing, staring’, stupid, senseless, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

2) [v.s. ...] one whose food is milk, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

3) [v.s. ...] m. the pupil of the eye, [Śiśupāla-vadha]

4) [v.s. ...] (only [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]) lamp-black

5) [v.s. ...] a dark or black dress

6) [v.s. ...] a lump of flesh

7) [v.s. ...] a [particular] ornament worn by women on the forehead

8) [v.s. ...] a [particular] ear-ornament

9) [v.s. ...] a bow-string

10) [v.s. ...] a wrinkled skin or contracted eyebrow

11) [v.s. ...] the cast-off skin of a snake

12) [v.s. ...] the plantain tree, Musa Sapientum

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Yates Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Locaka (लोचक):—(kaḥ) 1. m. A lump of flesh or meat; pupil of the eye; stibium; wrinkled eye-brow; ornament of the forehead; bow; string; folly; slough of a snake.

Source: DDSA: Paia-sadda-mahannavo; a comprehensive Prakrit Hindi dictionary (S)

Locaka (लोचक) in the Sanskrit language is related to the Prakrit word: Loaga.

[Sanskrit to German]

Locaka in German

context information

Sanskrit, also spelled संस्कृतम् (saṃskṛtam), is an ancient language of India commonly seen as the grandmother of the Indo-European language family (even English!). Closely allied with Prakrit and Pali, Sanskrit is more exhaustive in both grammar and terms and has the most extensive collection of literature in the world, greatly surpassing its sister-languages Greek and Latin.

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Kannada-English dictionary

Source: Alar: Kannada-English corpus

Lōcaka (ಲೋಚಕ):—

1) [noun] a stupid, foolish fellow.

2) [noun] the contractile circular opening, apparently black, in the center of the iris of the eye.

3) [noun] a black substance consisting chiefly of carbon particles formed by the incomplete combustion of burning matter.

4) [noun] a lump of meat.

5) [noun] the cast off skin of a snake.

6) [noun] a kind of ornament worn by women on their forehead.

7) [noun] a kind of ear-ornament.

8) [noun] a plantain tree.

9) [noun] wrinkled skin.

context information

Kannada is a Dravidian language (as opposed to the Indo-European language family) mainly spoken in the southwestern region of India.

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