Lingodbhava, aka: Liṅgodbhava, Linga-udbhava; 5 Definition(s)

Introduction

Lingodbhava means something in Hinduism, Sanskrit. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

In Hinduism

Purana and Itihasa (epic history)

Lingodbhava in Purana glossary... « previous · [L] · next »

Liṅgodbhava (लिङ्गोद्भव).—Story and praise of.*

  • * Vāyu-purāṇa Ch. 55.
Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: The Purana Index
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The Purana (पुराण, purāṇas) refers to Sanskrit literature preserving ancient India’s vast cultural history, including historical legends, religious ceremonies, various arts and sciences. The eighteen mahapuranas total over 400,000 shlokas (metrical couplets) and date to at least several centuries BCE.

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Shilpashastra (iconography)

Lingodbhava in Shilpashastra glossary... « previous · [L] · next »

Liṅgodbhava (लिङ्गोद्भव).—The image of liṅgodbhava should be like that of Candraśekhara, but legs should not be seen. Brahman should be carved as a haṃsa and Viṣṇu as Varāha or boar. All these texts also unanimously agree that Brahmā should be shown going upwards in the form of a bird and Viṣṇu digging downwards. All prescribe that Brahmā should be carved on the left side of the Liṅga and Viṣṇu to the right side, face downwards, digging the earth. (Āgama such as Uttarakāmika, paṭala 50; Suprabheda paṭala 43; Kāraṇa paṭala 11; and other treatises like Śilparatna paṭala 22; Śrītattvanidhi)

Source: Archaeological Survey of India: Śaiva monuments at Paṭṭadakal (śilpa)

Liṅgodbhava (लिङ्गोद्भव) is the name of a deity depicted in the Aruṇācaleśvar or Arunachaleswara Temple in Thiruvannamalai (Tiruvaṇṇāmalai) which is one of the Pañcasabhā or “five halls where Śiva is said to have danced”.—In the mūla-bera Liṅgodbhava, Śiva is seen at the centre of the liṅga and Brahmā seated on a swan at the right top of the liṅga and Viṣṇu in the form of a boar at the left lower part of the liṅga. Śiva is found with four hands. The upper right hand holds the axe and the upper left hand holds the deer and the lower right hand is in abhaya and the lower left hand in urū-hasta. He is found standing but his legs are not shown. Brahmā is found with four hands where the upper hands hold the brahmātandra and the kamanḍalu in the right and left respectively. Viṣṇu is portrayed with two hands digging the earth and going deep into the earth.

Liṅgodbhava is also depicted in the Thillai Nataraja Temple in Cidambaram (Chidambaram).— Śiva is found with four hands. The upper right hand holds the axe and the upper left hand holds the deer and the right hand is in abhaya and the left hand in urū-hasta. He is found standing but his legs are not carved. Brahmā is found with four hands where the upper hands hold brahmātandra and kamanḍalu in the right and the left respectively. Viṣṇu is portrayed with four hands where the upper hands hold a discus and a conch in kartarīmukha-hasta, and the lower right hand is in abhaya and the lower left hand is in katyavalambita-hasta.

Liṅgodbhava is also depicted in the Meenakshi Temple in Madurai (or Madura), which represents a sacred place for the worship of The Goddess (Devī).—Liṅgodbhava is the agni form of Śiva where the top part of the head and the bottom most part of the leg is not to be found by Viṣṇu and Brahmā. Śiva is represented standing in a circle of fire with four hands, where the upper right hand holds aṅkuśa (hook) in kapittha-hasta and the left hand holds mṛga (deer) in the kapittha-hasta. The lower right hand is in patāka and the lower left hand is in ardhacandra placed on the thigh. In iconographic form, he is represented in samapāda-sthānaka with the upper hands in kaṭaka and the lower hands in abhaya-hasta and urū-hasta.

Source: Shodhganga: The significance of the mūla-beras (śilpa)
Shilpashastra book cover
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Shilpashastra (शिल्पशास्त्र, śilpaśāstra) represents the ancient Indian science (shastra) of creative arts (shilpa) such as sculpture, iconography and painting. Closely related to Vastushastra (architecture), they often share the same literature.

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Shaivism (Shaiva philosophy)

Lingodbhava in Shaivism glossary... « previous · [L] · next »

1) Liṅgodbhava (लिङ्गोद्भव) or Liṅgodbhavamūrti refers to one of the twenty-three forms (mūrti) of Śiva mentioned in the Pūrvakāmikāgama (pratimālakṣaṇavidhi-paṭala): first and foremost among the Mūlāgama. The forms of Śiva (eg., Liṅgodbhava) are established through a process known as Sādākhya, described as a five-fold process of creation.

2) Liṅgodbhava is also listed among the twenty-eighth forms (mūrti) of Śiva mentioned in the Vātulāgama: twenty-eighth among the Siddhāntaśaivāgama.

3) Liṅgodbhava is also listed among the eighteen forms (mūrti) of Śiva mentioned in the Kāraṇāgama (pratimālakṣaṇavidhi-paṭala): the fourth among the Siddhāntaśaivāgamas.

4) Liṅgodbhava is also listed among the ten forms (mūrti) of Śiva mentioned in the Ajitāgama (under the Maheśvararūpa heading): the fifth among the Siddhāntaśaivāgamas.

5) Liṅgodbhava is also listed among the sixteen forms (mūrti) of Śiva mentioned in the Dīptāgama: the sixth among the Siddhāntaśaivāgamas.

6) Liṅgodbhava is also listed among the eighteen forms (mūrti) of Śiva mentioned in the Śilparatna (twenty-second adhyāya): a technical treatise by Śrīkumāra on Śilpaśāstra.

Source: Shodhganga: Iconographical representations of Śiva

Liṅgodbhava (लिङ्गोद्भव) refers to one of the manifestations of Śiva.—In the form of Liṅgodbhava, where God is immanent, formless and incomprehensible, he reveals to the devotees that he is a God who has no likes and dislikes. When a devotee sees the form of the Liṅgodbhava, he/she understands the reality of life that nothing is permanent in this world. The devotee also gains a lesson that falsehood is not appreciated by God. God never tolerates falsehood even if the devas or the gods or the goddesses get involved in it. It creates a realization in the devotee that if god can punish Brahmā, the creator, for his falsehood, then one day or the other the Lord will definitely punish the humans also for their evil activities.

Source: Shodhganga: The significance of the mūla-beras (shaivism)
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Shaiva (शैव, śaiva) or Shaivism (śaivism) represents a tradition of Hinduism worshiping Shiva as the supreme being. Closely related to Shaktism, Shaiva literature includes a range of scriptures, including Tantras, while the root of this tradition may be traced back to the ancient Vedas.

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