Lavanga, Lavaṅga: 13 definitions

Introduction

Lavanga means something in Hinduism, Sanskrit, Buddhism, Pali, the history of ancient India, Marathi. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

In Hinduism

Kavya (poetry)

[«previous (L) next»] — Lavanga in Kavya glossary
Source: archive.org: The ocean of story. vol. 8

Lavaṅga is the cravo of Garcia da Orta—i.e. cloves: Caryophyllus aromaticus, Linn. See Watt, op. cit., vol. ii, p. 205, who says “... they are also chewed in pān.”

context information

Kavya (काव्य, kavya) refers to Sanskrit poetry, a popular ancient Indian tradition of literature. There have been many Sanskrit poets over the ages, hailing from ancient India and beyond. This topic includes mahakavya, or ‘epic poetry’ and natya, or ‘dramatic poetry’.

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Ayurveda (science of life)

Source: Google Books: Essentials of Ayurveda

Lavaṅga (लवङ्ग).—The Sanskrit name for an important Ayurvedic drug.—The flower-buds are used. It is fragrant, bitter, pungent, cold, pacifies pitta and kapha and restores vāyu to its normal course.

Source: Shodhganga: Dietetics and culinary art in ancient and medieval India

Lavaṅga (लवङ्ग) refers to one of the fruits used in the treatment of aggravated phlegm, according to the 17th century Bhojanakutūhala (dravyaguṇāguṇa-kathana), and is commonly found in literature dealing with the topics of dietetics and culinary art, also known as Pākaśāstra or Pākakalā.—Procedure to alleviate kapha (phlegm) after meals: The excess phlegm in the human body can lead to the weakening of digestive fire. Sleeping immediately after the meal will result in the aggravation of phlegm. The excess phlegm must be alleviated by employing fumes of the fragrant substances or consuming fruits [like lavaṅga, ...]. After a meal, one must walk a few steps. Practising this lightens the food mass and imparts comfort in the neck, knees and loins. [...]

Lavaṅga (clove) is mentioned in a list of remedies for indigestion.—A complete section in Bhojanakutūhala is devoted for the description of agents that cause indigestion [viz., phenī]. These agents consumed on a large scale can cause indigestion for certain people. The remedies [viz., lavaṅga (clove)] for these types of indigestions are also explained therewith.

Source: Ancient Science of Life: Evaluation of Cyavanaprāśa on Health and Immunity related Parameters in Healthy Children

Lavaṅga (लवङ्ग) refers to the medicinal plant known as Syzygium aromaticum, Fl.Bd., and is used in the Ayurvedic formulation known as Cyavanaprāśa: an Ayurvedic health product that helps in boosting immunity.—Cyavanaprāśa has been found to be effective as an immunity booster, vitalizer and a preventer of day to day infections and allergies such as common cold and cough etc. It is a classical Ayurvedic formulation comprising ingredients such as Lavaṅga. [...] Cyavanaprāśa can be consumed in all seasons as it contains weather friendly ingredients which nullify unpleasant effects due to extreme environmental and climatic conditions.

Source: Ancient Science of Life: Botanical identification of plants described in Mādhava Cikitsā

Lavaṅga (लवङ्ग) or Lavaṭha refers to the medicinal plant Syzygium aromaticum L. Syn. Eugenia aromaticum Merril & Perry. Syn. Eugenia caryophyllata Thunb., and is used in the treatment of atisāra (diarrhoea), according to the 7th century Mādhavacikitsā chapter 2. Atisāra refers to a condition where there are three or more loose or liquid stools (bowel movements) per day or more stool than normal.  The second chapter of the Mādhavacikitsā explains several preparations [including Lavaṅga] through 60 Sanskrit verses about treating this problem.

Source: Shodhganga: Edition translation and critical study of yogasarasamgraha

Lavaṅga (लवङ्ग) refers to the medicinal plant known as “Syzygium aromaticum (Linn.) Merill & Perry” and is dealt with in the 15th-century Yogasārasaṅgraha (Yogasara-saṅgraha) by Vāsudeva: an unpublished Keralite work representing an Ayurvedic compendium of medicinal recipes. The Yogasārasaṃgraha [mentioning lavaṅga] deals with entire recipes in the route of administration, and thus deals with the knowledge of pharmacy (bhaiṣajya-kalpanā) which is a branch of pharmacology (dravyaguṇa).

Ayurveda book cover
context information

Āyurveda (आयुर्वेद, ayurveda) is a branch of Indian science dealing with medicine, herbalism, taxology, anatomy, surgery, alchemy and related topics. Traditional practice of Āyurveda in ancient India dates back to at least the first millenium BC. Literature is commonly written in Sanskrit using various poetic metres.

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Purana and Itihasa (epic history)

Source: archive.org: Shiva Purana - English Translation

Lavaṅga (लवङ्ग) or Lavaṅgavallī refers to the “clove creeper”, according to the Śivapurāṇa 2.2.21. Accordingly as Brahmā narrated to Nārada:—“[...] When Kāma (God of Love) reached the vicinity of Śiva, Spring spread all his splendour in accord with the inclination of the lord. [...] Rendering the breeze fragrant with its smell the clove creeper (lavaṅga-vallī) fascinated the minds of passionate people with its sweetness”.

Purana book cover
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The Purana (पुराण, purāṇas) refers to Sanskrit literature preserving ancient India’s vast cultural history, including historical legends, religious ceremonies, various arts and sciences. The eighteen mahapuranas total over 400,000 shlokas (metrical couplets) and date to at least several centuries BCE.

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India history and geogprahy

Source: Shodhganga: Cultural history as g leaned from kathasaritsagara

Lavanga is the name of a tree mentioned in the Kathasaritsagara by Somadeva (10th century A.D).—Lavanga refers to the “clove-tree” and is always mentioned with the Ela-bakula trees.

Somadeva mentions many rich forests, gardens, various trees (eg., Lavanga), creepers medicinal and flowering plants and fruit-bearing trees in the Kathasaritsagara. Travel through the thick, high, impregnable and extensive Vindhya forest is a typical feature of many travel-stories. Somadeva’s writing more or less reflects the life of the people of Northern India during the 11th century. His Kathasaritsagara (‘ocean of streams of story’), mentioning Lavanga, is a famous Sanskrit epic story revolving around prince Naravahanadatta and his quest to become the emperor of the vidyadharas (celestial beings).

India history book cover
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The history of India traces the identification of countries, villages, towns and other regions of India, as well as royal dynasties, rulers, tribes, local festivities and traditions and regional languages. Ancient India enjoyed religious freedom and encourages the path of Dharma, a concept common to Buddhism, Hinduism, and Jainism.

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Languages of India and abroad

Pali-English dictionary

[«previous (L) next»] — Lavanga in Pali glossary
Source: BuddhaSasana: Concise Pali-English Dictionary

lavaṅga : (nt.) the cloves.

Pali book cover
context information

Pali is the language of the Tipiṭaka, which is the sacred canon of Theravāda Buddhism and contains much of the Buddha’s speech. Closeley related to Sanskrit, both languages are used interchangeably between religions.

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Marathi-English dictionary

Source: DDSA: The Molesworth Marathi and English Dictionary

lavaṅga (लवंग).—f (S) The clove tree, Myristica or Eugenia Caryophyllata. 2 A clove. 3 An ear-ornament of gold &c., in shape resembling a clove. 4 Wild Clove-tree, Eugenia acris.

Source: DDSA: The Aryabhusan school dictionary, Marathi-English

lavaṅga (लवंग).—f A clove; the clove-tree.

context information

Marathi is an Indo-European language having over 70 million native speakers people in (predominantly) Maharashtra India. Marathi, like many other Indo-Aryan languages, evolved from early forms of Prakrit, which itself is a subset of Sanskrit, one of the most ancient languages of the world.

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Sanskrit-English dictionary

Source: DDSA: The practical Sanskrit-English dictionary

Lavaṅga (लवङ्ग).—[lū-aṅgac Uṇ.1.112] The clove plant; द्वीपान्तरानीतलवङ्गपुष्पैः (dvīpāntarānītalavaṅgapuṣpaiḥ) R.6.57; ललितलवङ्गलतापरिशीलनकोमलमलयसमीरे (lalitalavaṅgalatāpariśīlanakomalamalayasamīre) Gīt.1.

-gam Cloves.

Derivable forms: lavaṅgaḥ (लवङ्गः).

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Shabda-Sagara Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Lavaṅga (लवङ्ग).—m.

(-ṅgaḥ) The clove tree, (Myristica caryophyllata.) n.

(-ṅgaṃ) Cloves. E. to cut, Unadi aff. aṅgac; also with kan added, lavaṅgaka .

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Cappeller Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Lavaṅga (लवङ्ग).—[masculine] the clove tree; [neuter] cloves.

context information

Sanskrit, also spelled संस्कृतम् (saṃskṛtam), is an ancient language of India commonly seen as the grandmother of the Indo-European language family. Closely allied with Prakrit and Pali, Sanskrit is more exhaustive in both grammar and terms and has the most extensive collection of literature in the world, greatly surpassing its sister-languages Greek and Latin.

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