Lasa, Lāsa, Lasha, Lasā: 17 definitions

Introduction:

Lasa means something in Hinduism, Sanskrit, Buddhism, Pali, Marathi, Jainism, Prakrit, Hindi, biology. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

Languages of India and abroad

Pali-English dictionary

Source: BuddhaSasana: Concise Pali-English Dictionary

lāsa : (m.) dancing; sport.

Source: Sutta: The Pali Text Society's Pali-English Dictionary

Lāsa, (of las) sporting, dancing: see abhi°, vi°. (Page 583)

Pali book cover
context information

Pali is the language of the Tipiṭaka, which is the sacred canon of Theravāda Buddhism and contains much of the Buddha’s speech. Closeley related to Sanskrit, both languages are used interchangeably between religions.

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Marathi-English dictionary

Source: DDSA: The Molesworth Marathi and English Dictionary

lasa (लस).—f ( H) Sanious running; serous excretion.

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lāśā (लाशा).—a (lāsa) Bearing the mark of the cauterizing iron; branded or fired. 2 Having a spot or discoloration resembling the mark of the iron; or having a black and rotten spot in general--a fruit &c.

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lāsa (लास).—m A mark made by actual cautery. v dē, ghē. 2 A nautical term. Backing with an oar to turn the head of the boat. Used with valhēṃ or nāvēsa &c., and v dhara, kara.

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lāsā (लासा).—a R Commonly lāśā.

Source: DDSA: The Aryabhusan school dictionary, Marathi-English

lasa (लस).—f Sanious running; serous excretion.

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lāsa (लास).—m A mark made by actual cautery.

context information

Marathi is an Indo-European language having over 70 million native speakers people in (predominantly) Maharashtra India. Marathi, like many other Indo-Aryan languages, evolved from early forms of Prakrit, which itself is a subset of Sanskrit, one of the most ancient languages of the world.

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Sanskrit dictionary

Source: DDSA: The practical Sanskrit-English dictionary

Lasā (लसा).—[lasati las-ac]

1) Saffron.

2) Turmeric.

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Lāsa (लास).—[las-ghañ]

1) Jumping, sporting, skipping about, dancing; मदनजनितलासैः (madanajanitalāsaiḥ) Ṛtusaṃhāra 6.3.

2) Dalliance, wanton sport.

3) Dancing as practised by women.

4) Soup, broth.

Derivable forms: lāsaḥ (लासः).

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Edgerton Buddhist Hybrid Sanskrit Dictionary

Lasa (लस).—adj. (otherwise recorded only in neg. a-lasa), active, quick-moving: suku (= Sanskrit śuko) lasu (= laso; only v.l. in mss. rasu) guṇadhara…Lalitavistara 167.1 (verse), (when you were once incarnate as) a virtuous parrot, quick-darting. No other interpretation seems possible, unless we em. to a deriv. of lap-, compare AMg. lava, speaking, and [Buddhist Hybrid Sanskrit] -lāpika. Tibetan seems to omit the word.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Shabda-Sagara Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Lasā (लसा).—f.

(-sā) 1. Turmeric. 2. Saffron. E. las to sport, affs. aṅ and ṭāp .

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Lāsa (लास).—m.

(-saḥ) 1. Dancing in general. 2. Dancing, as practised by women: see lāsya. 3. Pulse that has been steeped or slightly boiled, pea-water, &c. not thickened to the consistency of Yusha or peasesoup. 4. Dalliance, wanton sport, &c. E. las to sport, aff. ghañ .

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Benfey Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Lāsa (लास).—i. e. las + a, m. 1. Dancing. 2. Dalliance. 3. Pea-water, pulse that has been lightly boiled.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Cappeller Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Lāsa (लास).—[masculine] jumping, sporting, dancing.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Monier-Williams Sanskrit-English Dictionary

1) Laśa (लश):—m. gum, resin, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

2) Lasa (लस):—[from las] mfn. shining, playing, moving hither and thither (cf. a-lasa)

3) [v.s. ...] having the smell of bell-metal, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

4) [v.s. ...] m. fever in a camel, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

5) [v.s. ...] smell of bell-metal, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

6) Lasā (लसा):—[from lasa > las] f. saffron, turmeric, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

7) Lasa (लस):—[from las] n. red sandalwood, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

8) Lāsa (लास):—[from las] a m. the act of jumping, sporting, dancing, [Ṛtusaṃhāra] (cf. rāsa)

9) [v.s. ...] dancing as practised by women, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

10) [v.s. ...] soup. broth (= yūṣa), [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

11) [v.s. ...] saliva (?), in alāsa q.v.

12) b lāsin, lāsya See p. 899, col. 2.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Yates Sanskrit-English Dictionary

1) Lasā (लसा):—(sā) 1. f. Turmeric.

2) Lāsa (लास):—(saḥ) 1. m. Dancing; pea-water; dalliance.

Source: DDSA: Paia-sadda-mahannavo; a comprehensive Prakrit Hindi dictionary (S)

Lāsa (लास) in the Sanskrit language is related to the Prakrit word: Lāva.

[Sanskrit to German]

Lasa in German

context information

Sanskrit, also spelled संस्कृतम् (saṃskṛtam), is an ancient language of India commonly seen as the grandmother of the Indo-European language family (even English!). Closely allied with Prakrit and Pali, Sanskrit is more exhaustive in both grammar and terms and has the most extensive collection of literature in the world, greatly surpassing its sister-languages Greek and Latin.

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Hindi dictionary

Source: DDSA: A practical Hindi-English dictionary

1) Lasa (लस) [Also spelled las]:—(nm) pastiness, stickiness, adhesiveness; ~[dāra] glutinous, sticky, adhesive.

2) Lāśa (लाश) [Also spelled lash]:—(nf) corpse, dead boby; carcass; ~[ghara] mortuary; —[galiyoṃ meṃ khiṃcavānā] to cause to be dragged in streets to insult after death; —[para lāśa giranā] fighting men to fall one after another, a heap of corpses to be piled up; [lāśoṃ se paṭa jānā] to be strewn all over with corpses.

3) Lāsā (लासा):—(nm) a glutinous/adhesive substance; bird-line; a bait; lure; —[denā] to lure, to bait; —[lagākara ciḍiyā phaṃsānā] to lure a bird into captivity; —[lagānā] to involve into a trap; to cause a quarrel.

context information

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Prakrit-English dictionary

Source: DDSA: Paia-sadda-mahannavo; a comprehensive Prakrit Hindi dictionary

1) Lasa (लस) in the Prakrit language is related to the Sanskrit word: Las.

2) Lāsa (लास) also relates to the Sanskrit word: Lāsya.

context information

Prakrit is an ancient language closely associated with both Pali and Sanskrit. Jain literature is often composed in this language or sub-dialects, such as the Agamas and their commentaries which are written in Ardhamagadhi and Maharashtri Prakrit. The earliest extant texts can be dated to as early as the 4th century BCE although core portions might be older.

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Kannada-English dictionary

Source: Alar: Kannada-English corpus

Lāsa (ಲಾಸ):—[noun] rapid, lively movement (as from or expressing joy); dance.

context information

Kannada is a Dravidian language (as opposed to the Indo-European language family) mainly spoken in the southwestern region of India.

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