Lakshmanadeshika, aka: Lakṣmaṇadeśika; 1 Definition(s)

Introduction

Lakshmanadeshika means something in Hinduism, Sanskrit. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

The Sanskrit term Lakṣmaṇadeśika can be transliterated into English as Laksmanadesika or Lakshmanadeshika, using the IAST transliteration scheme (?).

In Hinduism

Shaktism (Shakta philosophy)

[Lakshmanadeshika in Shaktism glossaries]

Lakṣmaṇadeśika (लक्ष्मणदेशिक) (or Lakṣmaṇadeśikendra, Lakṣmaṇācārya), author of the Śāradātilaka-tantra, is the son of Śrīkṛṣṇa and great-grandson of Mahābala according to the 11th-century Śaradātilaka verse 25.86-87.—“(86) Of that lord, who possessed an Ācārya’s wealth of knowledge, Lakṣmaṇadeśikendra [was] the son, who obtained great fame in all [branches of] knowledge (vidyā) and all [performing] arts (kalā). (87) This wise man here composed the Tantra named the illustrious “forehead mark of Śāradā” (Śāradātilaka), taking the complete essence from all the Āgamas [and making the number of] chapters [the same as] the number of constituents (tattva) [i.e. twenty-five], with the object of long giving joy to learned [people]”.

(Source): academia.edu: The Śāradātilakatantra on Yoga
Shaktism book cover
context information

Shakta (शाक्त, śākta) or Shaktism (śāktism) represents a tradition of Hinduism where the Goddess (Devi) is revered and worshipped. Shakta literature includes a range of scriptures, including various Agamas and Tantras, although its roots may be traced back to the Vedas.

Discover the meaning of lakshmanadeshika or laksmanadesika in the context of Shaktism from relevant books on Exotic India

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