Kurandaka, Kuraṇḍaka: 11 definitions

Introduction

Introduction:

Kurandaka means something in Buddhism, Pali, Hinduism, Sanskrit. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

In Hinduism

Shaktism (Shakta philosophy)

[«previous next»] — Kurandaka in Shaktism glossary
Source: Wisdom Library: Śrīmad Devī Bhāgavatam

Kuraṇḍaka (कुरण्डक) is the name of a tree found in maṇidvīpa (Śakti’s abode), according to the Devī-bhāgavata-purāṇa 12.10. Accordingly, these trees always bear flowers, fruits and new leaves, and the sweet fragrance of their scent is spread across all the quarters in this place. The trees (e.g. Kuraṇḍaka) attract bees and birds of various species and rivers are seen flowing through their forests carrying many juicy liquids. Maṇidvīpa is defined as the home of Devī, built according to her will. It is compared with Sarvaloka, as it is superior to all other lokas.

The Devī-bhāgavata-purāṇa, or Śrīmad-devī-bhāgavatam, is categorised as a Mahāpurāṇa, a type of Sanskrit literature containing cultural information on ancient India, religious/spiritual prescriptions and a range of topics concerning the various arts and sciences. The whole text is composed of 18,000 metrical verses, possibly originating from before the 6th century.

Shaktism book cover
context information

Shakta (शाक्त, śākta) or Shaktism (śāktism) represents a tradition of Hinduism where the Goddess (Devi) is revered and worshipped. Shakta literature includes a range of scriptures, including various Agamas and Tantras, although its roots may be traced back to the Vedas.

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Kavya (poetry)

[«previous next»] — Kurandaka in Kavya glossary
Source: Wisdom Library: Kathāsaritsāgara

Kuraṇḍaka (कुरण्डक) or Kuraṇḍa is the name of a mountain whose lord is named Kācaraka: a great warrior (mahāratha) who fought on Śrutaśarman’s side but was slain by Prabhāsa, who participated in the war against Sūryaprabha, according to the Kathāsaritsāgara, chapter 48.  Accordingly: “... then four more great warriors, armed with bows, sent by Śrutaśarman, surrounded Prabhāsa:... one was named Kācaraka, the lord of the mountain Kuraṇḍaka”. Kuraṇḍaka is also known as Kuraṇḍakagiri.

The Kathāsaritsāgara (‘ocean of streams of story’), mentioning Kuraṇḍaka, is a famous Sanskrit epic story revolving around prince Naravāhanadatta and his quest to become the emperor of the vidyādharas (celestial beings). The work is said to have been an adaptation of Guṇāḍhya’s Bṛhatkathā consisting of 100,000 verses, which in turn is part of a larger work containing 700,000 verses.

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Kavya (काव्य, kavya) refers to Sanskrit poetry, a popular ancient Indian tradition of literature. There have been many Sanskrit poets over the ages, hailing from ancient India and beyond. This topic includes mahakavya, or ‘epic poetry’ and natya, or ‘dramatic poetry’.

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In Buddhism

Theravada (major branch of Buddhism)

Source: Pali Kanon: Pali Proper Names

A cave, probably in Ceylon. It contained beautiful paintings of the renunciation of seven Buddhas, but the Elder Cittagutta (q.v.), who lived in the cave for a long time, never saw them because he had never lifted his eyes.

There was a great ironwood (naga) tree at the entrance to the cave.

The Elder, at the request of the king, once went to visit him, but after seven days, not being happy in the palace, he returned to Kurandaka. Vsm.i.38f.

context information

Theravāda is a major branch of Buddhism having the the Pali canon (tipitaka) as their canonical literature, which includes the vinaya-pitaka (monastic rules), the sutta-pitaka (Buddhist sermons) and the abhidhamma-pitaka (philosophy and psychology).

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Languages of India and abroad

Pali-English dictionary

[«previous next»] — Kurandaka in Pali glossary
Source: BuddhaSasana: Concise Pali-English Dictionary

kuraṇḍaka : (m.) a flower plant; a species of Amaranth.

Source: Sutta: The Pali Text Society's Pali-English Dictionary

Kuraṇḍaka, (cp. Sk. kuraṇṭaka blossom of a species of Amaranth) a shrub and its flower Vism. 183 (see also kuravaka & koraṇḍaka). °leṇa Npl. Vism. 38. (Page 222)

Pali book cover
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Pali is the language of the Tipiṭaka, which is the sacred canon of Theravāda Buddhism and contains much of the Buddha’s speech. Closeley related to Sanskrit, both languages are used interchangeably between religions.

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Sanskrit dictionary

[«previous next»] — Kurandaka in Sanskrit glossary
Source: DDSA: The practical Sanskrit-English dictionary

Kuraṇḍaka (कुरण्डक).—Yellow amaranth.

Derivable forms: kuraṇḍakaḥ (कुरण्डकः).

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Shabda-Sagara Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Kuraṇḍaka (कुरण्डक).—m.

(-kaḥ) Yellow amaranth: see kuruṇṭaka.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Monier-Williams Sanskrit-English Dictionary

1) Kuraṇḍaka (कुरण्डक):—[from kuraṇṭa] m. yellow amaranth, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

2) [v.s. ...] a yellow kind of Barleria, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Yates Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Kuraṇḍaka (कुरण्डक):—(kaḥ) 1. m. Yellow amaranth.

context information

Sanskrit, also spelled संस्कृतम् (saṃskṛtam), is an ancient language of India commonly seen as the grandmother of the Indo-European language family (even English!). Closely allied with Prakrit and Pali, Sanskrit is more exhaustive in both grammar and terms and has the most extensive collection of literature in the world, greatly surpassing its sister-languages Greek and Latin.

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