Kundadanta, aka: Kunda-danta, Kuṇḍadanta; 2 Definition(s)

Introduction

Kundadanta means something in Hinduism, Sanskrit. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

In Hinduism

Purana

Kuṇḍadanta (कुण्डदन्त).—A Videha brahmin, Kuṇḍadanta gave up his worldly possession for the attainment of spiritual knowledge, and sought the help of sage Kadamba. Finding that he had not yet completely mastered the senses Kadamba sent him to Ayodhyā, where he lived with Śrī Rāma, and Vasiṣṭha taught him the necessary texts on the subject so that he attained spiritual knowledge. (Yogavāsiṣṭha).

(Source): archive.org: Puranic Encyclopaedia
Purana book cover
context information

The Purana (पुराण, purāṇas) refers to Sanskrit literature preserving ancient India’s vast cultural history, including historical legends, religious ceremonies, various arts and sciences. The eighteen mahapuranas total over 400,000 shlokas (metrical couplets) and date to at least several centuries BCE.

Languages of India and abroad

Sanskrit-English dictionary

Kundadanta (कुन्ददन्त).—a. One whose teeth are like the jasmine.

Kundadanta is a Sanskrit compound consisting of the terms kunda and danta (दन्त). See also (synonyms): kundasama.

(Source): DDSA: The practical Sanskrit-English dictionary
context information

Sanskrit, also spelled संस्कृतम् (saṃskṛtam), is an ancient language of India commonly seen as the grandmother of the Indo-European language family. Closely allied with Prakrit and Pali, Sanskrit is more exhaustive in both grammar and terms and has the most extensive collection of literature in the world, greatly surpassing its sister-languages Greek and Latin.

Relevant definitions

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Kundagolaka
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