Kumkuma, aka: Kuṃkumā, Kuṃkuma; 2 Definition(s)

Introduction

Kumkuma means something in Hinduism, Sanskrit. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

In Hinduism

Shaivism (Shaiva philosophy)

Kuṃkumā (कुंकुमा) is the consort of Mīnanātha (also known as Piṅgalanātha), an incarnation of Siddhanātha in the fourth yuga, belonging to the Pūrvāmnāya (‘eastern doctrine’) tradition of Kula Śaivism, according to the Ciñcinīmatasārasamuccaya. Her name can also be spelled Kuṅkumā. Siddhanātha incarnates as a Kaula master in each of the four yugas.

Source: Wisdom Library: Śaivism
Shaivism book cover
context information

Shaiva (शैव, śaiva) or Shaivism (śaivism) represents a tradition of Hinduism worshiping Shiva as the supreme being. Closely related to Shaktism, Shaiva literature includes a range of scriptures, including Tantras, while the root of this tradition may be traced back to the ancient Vedas.

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Shaktism (Shakta philosophy)

Kuṃkuma (कुंकुम) or Kuṃkumatantra refers to one of the twenty-eight Gāruḍatantras, belonging to the Śāktāgama (or Śāktatantra) division of the Āgama tradition. The Śāktāgamas represent the wisdom imparted by Devī to Īśvara and convey the idea that the worship of Śakti is the means to attain liberation. According to the Pratiṣṭhālakṣaṇasamuccaya of Vairocana, the Śāktatantras are divided into to four parts, the Kuṃkuma belonging to the Garuḍa class.

Source: Shodhganga: Iconographical representations of Śiva (shaktism)
Shaktism book cover
context information

Shakta (शाक्त, śākta) or Shaktism (śāktism) represents a tradition of Hinduism where the Goddess (Devi) is revered and worshipped. Shakta literature includes a range of scriptures, including various Agamas and Tantras, although its roots may be traced back to the Vedas.

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Relevant definitions

Search found 64 related definition(s) that might help you understand this better. Below you will find the 15 most relevant articles:

Kumkumatantra
Kuṃkumatantra (कुंकुमतन्त्र) or simply Kuṃkuma refers to one of the twenty-eight Gāruḍatantras,...
Padma
Padma (पद्म).—(paduma) , m. or nt., (1) n. of a kind of brahmanical sacrifice: Mv ii.237.20 (pr...
Yoga
Yoga (योग).—m. (Pali id., PTSD s.v. 3; not in Sanskrit), bond, tie, attachment (in Pali numberi...
Kunkuma
Kuṅkuma (कुङ्कुम).—m. (-maḥ) Saffron, (Crocus sativus.) E. kuki to take, and umak aff.
Ananda
Ānanda (आनन्द).—m. (-ndaḥ) 1. Happiness, joy. 2. Balarama according to the Jaina system of many...
Mahendra
Mahendra (महेन्द्र).—m. (-ndraḥ) Indra, the ruler of Swarga. 2. A range of mountains, one of th...
Bhadra
Bhadra (भद्र).—mfn. (-draḥ-drā-draṃ) 1. Happy, prosperous, lucky, propitious. 2. Best, excellen...
Pada
Pada (पद).—(= Pali id.), sentence, complete utterance, in contrast with nāman, word, and vyañja...
Kesara
Kesara (केसर) is the name of a tree (Maulśrī) that is associated with the Nakṣatra (celestial s...
Kunda
Kuṇḍa (कुण्ड).—m. (-ṇḍaḥ) A son born in adultery, the son of a woman by another man than her hu...
Palasha
Palāśa (पलाश).—mfn. (-śaḥ-śā-śaṃ) 1. Green. 2. Unfeeling, unmerciful, cruel. n. (-śaṃ) A leaf. ...
Mahidhara
Mahīdhara (महीधर).—n. of a minister: Divy 318.18 ff.; previous birth of Maudgalyāyana, 328.15&m...
Amara
Amara (अमर).—m. (-raḥ) 1. A deity, an immortal. 2. A plant, (Heliotropium indicum.) See asthisa...
Campaka
Campaka (चम्पक).—m. (-kaḥ) 1. A tree bearing a yellow fragrant flower, (Michelia champaca.) 2. ...
Mallika
1) Mallikā (मल्लिका) refers to one of the 130 varṇavṛttas (syllabo-quantitative verse) dealt wi...

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