Kumarika, Kumārikā, Kumārika: 15 definitions

Introduction

Introduction:

Kumarika means something in Hinduism, Sanskrit, Jainism, Prakrit, Buddhism, Pali, Marathi, Hindi. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

In Hinduism

Purana and Itihasa (epic history)

[«previous next»] — Kumarika in Purana glossary
Source: JatLand: List of Mahabharata people and places

Kumārika (कुमारिक) refers to the name of a Tīrtha (pilgrim’s destination) mentioned in the Mahābhārata (cf. ). Note: The Mahābhārata (mentioning Kumārika) is a Sanskrit epic poem consisting of 100,000 ślokas (metrical verses) and is over 2000 years old.

Purana book cover
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The Purana (पुराण, purāṇas) refers to Sanskrit literature preserving ancient India’s vast cultural history, including historical legends, religious ceremonies, various arts and sciences. The eighteen mahapuranas total over 400,000 shlokas (metrical couplets) and date to at least several centuries BCE.

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Shaktism (Shakta philosophy)

Source: Google Books: Manthanabhairavatantram

Kumārikā (कुमारिका) refers to the “land of the virgin goddess” or India, according to the Kubjikāmata-tantra, the earliest popular and most authoritative Tantra of the Kubjikā cult.—Bhairava orders the goddess to travel around India to establish the energy of her Command throughout it. In this way the land of Bhārata, pervaded by the Goddess’s energy is made one with it and so becomes the land of the virgin goddess—Kumārikā.

Shaktism book cover
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Shakta (शाक्त, śākta) or Shaktism (śāktism) represents a tradition of Hinduism where the Goddess (Devi) is revered and worshipped. Shakta literature includes a range of scriptures, including various Agamas and Tantras, although its roots may be traced back to the Vedas.

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In Jainism

General definition (in Jainism)

Source: archive.org: The Jaina Iconography

Kumārikā (कुमारिका) is the name of a Yoginī mentioned in various Jaina manuscripts, often being part of a list of sixty-four such deities. How the cult of the Tantrik Yoginīs originated among the vegetarian Jainas is unknown. The Yoginīs (viz., Kumārikā) are known as attendants on Śiva or Pārvatī. But in the case of Jainism, we may suppose, as seen before that they are subordinates to Kṣetrapāla, the chief of the Bhairavas.

General definition book cover
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Jainism is an Indian religion of Dharma whose doctrine revolves around harmlessness (ahimsa) towards every living being. The two major branches (Digambara and Svetambara) of Jainism stimulate self-control (or, shramana, ‘self-reliance’) and spiritual development through a path of peace for the soul to progess to the ultimate goal.

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Languages of India and abroad

Pali-English dictionary

[«previous next»] — Kumarika in Pali glossary
Source: BuddhaSasana: Concise Pali-English Dictionary

kumārikā : (f.) a girl; virgin.

Pali book cover
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Pali is the language of the Tipiṭaka, which is the sacred canon of Theravāda Buddhism and contains much of the Buddha’s speech. Closeley related to Sanskrit, both languages are used interchangeably between religions.

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Marathi-English dictionary

Source: DDSA: The Molesworth Marathi and English Dictionary

kumārikā (कुमारिका).—f S kumārī f (S) An unmarried girl, from ten to twelve years old: also a young virgin gen. 2 Aloe-plant, Aloe perfoliata.

Source: DDSA: The Aryabhusan school dictionary, Marathi-English

kumārikā (कुमारिका).—f An unmarried girl, a young virgin. Aloe plant.

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Marathi is an Indo-European language having over 70 million native speakers people in (predominantly) Maharashtra India. Marathi, like many other Indo-Aryan languages, evolved from early forms of Prakrit, which itself is a subset of Sanskrit, one of the most ancient languages of the world.

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Sanskrit dictionary

Source: DDSA: The practical Sanskrit-English dictionary

Kumārika (कुमारिक).—a. (- f.)

--- OR ---

Kumārikā (कुमारिका).—

1) A young girl, one from 1 to 12 years old.

2) A maiden, virgin; त्रीणि वर्षाण्युदीक्षेत कुमार्यृतुमती सती (trīṇi varṣāṇyudīkṣeta kumāryṛtumatī satī) Ms.9.9;11.59; व्यावर्ततान्योपगमात्कुमारी (vyāvartatānyopagamātkumārī) R.6.69.

3) A girl or daughter in general.

4) Name of Durgā.

5) Name of several plants (Mar. koraphaḍa, karṭaulī, kāṃṭeśevaṃtī, baṭamogarā i.)

6) Name of Sītā.

7) Large cardamoms.

8) The southern extremity of the Indian peninsula (cf. the modern name Cape Comorin).

See also (synonyms): kumārī.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Edgerton Buddhist Hybrid Sanskrit Dictionary

Kumārikā (कुमारिका).—see s.v. Kumārī (2).

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Shabda-Sagara Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Kumārikā (कुमारिका).—f.

(-kā) 1. A girl from ten to twelve years old, or generally a virgin. 2. Double jasmin. 3. A division of the known continent. 4. Large cardamoms. 5. An insect, (Spex Asiatica:) see kumārī, kan being added.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Monier-Williams Sanskrit-English Dictionary

1) Kumārikā (कुमारिका):—[from kumāraka > kumāra] a f. a girl from ten to twelve years old, virgin, [Atharva-veda; Tāṇḍya-brāhmaṇa; Mahābhārata] etc.

2) [v.s. ...] a female servant, [Varāha-mihira’s Bṛhat-saṃhitā]

3) [v.s. ...] an insect (Sphex asiatica), [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

4) [v.s. ...] double jasmine (Jasminum Sambac), [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

5) [v.s. ...] large cardamoms, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

6) [v.s. ...] Name of a part of Bhārata-varṣa (a division of the known continent), [Viṣṇu-purāṇa]

7) [v.s. ...] Name of a river, [Hemādri’s Caturvarga-cintāmaṇi]

8) Kumārika (कुमारिक):—[from kumāra] mfn. furnished with or abounding in girls [gana] vrīhy-ādi.

9) Kumārikā (कुमारिका):—[from kumāra] b f. of raka q.v.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Yates Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Kumārikā (कुमारिका):—(kā) 1. f. A girl from 10 to 12 years old; double jasmin; division of the continent; a large cardamon; an insect.

Source: DDSA: Paia-sadda-mahannavo; a comprehensive Prakrit Hindi dictionary (S)

Kumārika (कुमारिक) in the Sanskrit language is related to the Prakrit word: Kumāriya.

[Sanskrit to German]

Kumarika in German

context information

Sanskrit, also spelled संस्कृतम् (saṃskṛtam), is an ancient language of India commonly seen as the grandmother of the Indo-European language family (even English!). Closely allied with Prakrit and Pali, Sanskrit is more exhaustive in both grammar and terms and has the most extensive collection of literature in the world, greatly surpassing its sister-languages Greek and Latin.

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Hindi dictionary

[«previous next»] — Kumarika in Hindi glossary
Source: DDSA: A practical Hindi-English dictionary

Kumārikā (कुमारिका):—(a) see [kumārī].

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See also (Relevant definitions)

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