Kulisha, Kuliśa, Kuliśa, Kulisa, Kulīśa: 18 definitions

Introduction:

Kulisha means something in Buddhism, Pali, Hinduism, Sanskrit, Jainism, Prakrit. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

The Sanskrit terms Kuliśa and Kuliśa and Kulīśa can be transliterated into English as Kulisa or Kulisha, using the IAST transliteration scheme (?).

In Hinduism

Purana and Itihasa (epic history)

Source: archive.org: Shiva Purana - English Translation

Kulīśa (कुलीश) is the name of a Gaṇa-chief who participated in Vīrabhadra’s campaign against Dakṣa, according to the Śivapurāṇa 2.2.33. Accordingly, as Brahmā narrated to Nārada:—“O Nārada, listen to the numerical strength of the most important and courageous of those groups. [...] O sage, Saṃvartaka, Kulīśa, Svayamprabhu, Lokāntaka, Dīptātmā, Daityāntaka, Bhṛṅgīriṭi, Devadevapriya, Aśani and Bhālaka each went with sixty-four thousand Gaṇas. [...] Thus at the bidding of Śiva, the heroic Vīrabhadra went ahead followed by crores and crores, thousands and thousands, hundreds and hundreds of Gaṇas [viz., Kulīśa]”.

Purana book cover
context information

The Purana (पुराण, purāṇas) refers to Sanskrit literature preserving ancient India’s vast cultural history, including historical legends, religious ceremonies, various arts and sciences. The eighteen mahapuranas total over 400,000 shlokas (metrical couplets) and date to at least several centuries BCE.

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Ayurveda (science of life)

Source: archive.org: Sushruta samhita, Volume I

Kuliśa (कुलिश)—Sanskrit word for a fish. This animal is from the group called Sāmudra-matsya (‘marine fish’). Sāmudra-matsya itself is a sub-group of the group of animals known as Ānupa (those that frequent marshy places).

Ayurveda book cover
context information

Āyurveda (आयुर्वेद, ayurveda) is a branch of Indian science dealing with medicine, herbalism, taxology, anatomy, surgery, alchemy and related topics. Traditional practice of Āyurveda in ancient India dates back to at least the first millenium BC. Literature is commonly written in Sanskrit using various poetic metres.

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General definition (in Hinduism)

Source: Wisdom Library: Hinduism

Kuliśa (कुलिश)—Sanskrit word for a type of Battle-ax mentioned in the Mahābhārata.

Source: archive.org: Vedic index of Names and Subjects

Kuliśa (कुलिश, ‘axe’), is mentioned in the Ṛgveda as used for the making of chariots, and also in warfare, while the Atharvaveda refers to its employment in cutting down trees.

In Buddhism

Tibetan Buddhism (Vajrayana or tantric Buddhism)

Source: Google Books: Vajrayogini

Kuliśa (कुलिश) is another name for Kulika: the serpent deity (nāga) of the south-western cremation ground.—Kulika is described in the Śmaśānavidhi as smoke-colored, having a half-moon on his hood, seated beneath the mass of creepers, making the añjali. The manuscript of Guhyasamayasādhanamālā reports Kuliśa.

Source: OSU Press: Cakrasamvara Samadhi

Kuliśa (कुलिश) refers to a “skull cup”, according to the Cakrasaṃvara Samādhi [i.e., Cakrasamvara Meditation] ritual often performed in combination with the Cakrasaṃvara Samādhi, which refers to the primary pūjā and sādhanā practice of Newah Mahāyāna-Vajrayāna Buddhists in Nepal.—Accordingly, “By the form of a skull cup, and by the letter Māṃ, Vāruṇī, Eighteen arms, one face, red color, and three eyes, A sword, arrow and hook, on the right, a skull cup (kuliśa), ax and banner, Thus a mace, thus a bell, and in the ninth, granting wishes, A two-headed drum, a bow and noose, a staff and a water pot, A trident, hammer and lute, and thus a number, in the upper hand, A young adolescent beauty, a great beauty, a beautiful goddess”.

Tibetan Buddhism book cover
context information

Tibetan Buddhism includes schools such as Nyingma, Kadampa, Kagyu and Gelug. Their primary canon of literature is divided in two broad categories: The Kangyur, which consists of Buddha’s words, and the Tengyur, which includes commentaries from various sources. Esotericism and tantra techniques (vajrayāna) are collected indepently.

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Languages of India and abroad

Pali-English dictionary

[«previous next»] — Kulisha in Pali glossary
Source: BuddhaSasana: Concise Pali-English Dictionary

kulisa : (nt.) thunder-bolt; a mace.

Pali book cover
context information

Pali is the language of the Tipiṭaka, which is the sacred canon of Theravāda Buddhism and contains much of the Buddha’s speech. Closeley related to Sanskrit, both languages are used interchangeably between religions.

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Sanskrit dictionary

Source: DDSA: The practical Sanskrit-English dictionary

Kuliśa (कुलिश).—

1) The thunderbolt of Indra; वृत्रस्य हन्तुः कुलिशं कुण्ठिताश्रीव लभ्यते (vṛtrasya hantuḥ kuliśaṃ kuṇṭhitāśrīva labhyate) Kumārasambhava 2.2; Pañcatantra (Bombay) 1; अवेदनाज्ञं कुलिश- क्षतानाम् (avedanājñaṃ kuliśa- kṣatānām) Kumārasambhava 1.2; R.3.68;4.88; Amaruśataka 96.

2) Ved. An axe, a hatchet; स्कन्धांसीव कुलिशेना (skandhāṃsīva kuliśenā) Ṛgveda 1.32.5.

3) The point or end of a thing; Meghadūta 63.

Derivable forms: kuliśaḥ (कुलिशः), kuliśam (कुलिशम्).

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Kulīśa (कुलीश).—Indra's thunderbolt.

Derivable forms: kulīśaḥ (कुलीशः), kulīśam (कुलीशम्).

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Shabda-Sagara Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Kuliśa (कुलिश).—mn.

(-śaḥ-śaṃ) 1. The thunderbolt of Indra. 2. A kind of fish. E. kuli for kula a bank, and śa what rests, from śīñ to sleep, &c. and ka aff.

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Kulīśa (कुलीश).—mn.

(-śaḥ-śaṃ) Indra'S thunderbolt: see kuliśa.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Benfey Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Kuliśa (कुलिश).—[ku-liś + a] (perhaps rather kliś + a), m. and n. 1. An axe, Mahābhārata 3, 810. 2. The thunderbolt of Indra, [Bhartṛhari, (ed. Bohlen.)] 2, 29.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Cappeller Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Kuliśa (कुलिश).—[masculine] axe, hatchet, a cert. fish; [neuter] thunderbolt, diamond; [feminine] kuliśī [Name] of a river in the sky.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Monier-Williams Sanskrit-English Dictionary

1) Kuliśa (कुलिश):—m. ([from] 1. ku and liśa for riśa [from] √riś), an axe, hatchet, [Ṛg-veda i, 32, 5 and iii, 2, 1; Atharva-veda; Mahābhārata]

2) n. [as m., [Naighaṇṭuka, commented on by Yāska; Nirukta, by Yāska] and, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]] the thunderbolt of Indra, [Mahābhārata; Raghuvaṃśa; Bhartṛhari] etc.

3) n. (= vajra) a diamond, [Meghadūta; Rājataraṅgiṇī vi, 273]

4) m. a sort of fish, [Suśruta]

5) mn. the plant Heliotropium indicum, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

6) Kulīśa (कुलीश):—mn. (= kuliśa) Indra’s thunderbolt, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Yates Sanskrit-English Dictionary

1) Kuliśa (कुलिश):—[(śaḥ-śaṃ)] 1. m. n. The thunderbolt of Indra; a kind of fish.

2) Kulīśa (कुलीश):—[(śaḥ-śaṃ)] 1. m. n. Thunder-bolt.

Source: DDSA: Paia-sadda-mahannavo; a comprehensive Prakrit Hindi dictionary (S)

Kuliśa (कुलिश) in the Sanskrit language is related to the Prakrit word: Kulisa.

[Sanskrit to German]

Kulisha in German

context information

Sanskrit, also spelled संस्कृतम् (saṃskṛtam), is an ancient language of India commonly seen as the grandmother of the Indo-European language family (even English!). Closely allied with Prakrit and Pali, Sanskrit is more exhaustive in both grammar and terms and has the most extensive collection of literature in the world, greatly surpassing its sister-languages Greek and Latin.

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Prakrit-English dictionary

Source: DDSA: Paia-sadda-mahannavo; a comprehensive Prakrit Hindi dictionary

Kulisa (कुलिस) in the Prakrit language is related to the Sanskrit word: Kuliśa.

context information

Prakrit is an ancient language closely associated with both Pali and Sanskrit. Jain literature is often composed in this language or sub-dialects, such as the Agamas and their commentaries which are written in Ardhamagadhi and Maharashtri Prakrit. The earliest extant texts can be dated to as early as the 4th century BCE although core portions might be older.

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Kannada-English dictionary

Source: Alar: Kannada-English corpus

Kuliśa (ಕುಲಿಶ):—

1) [noun] (myth.) the bolt or missile of Indra, the Chief of gods; the thunder-bolt.

2) [noun] a mineral consisting of nearly pure carbon in crystalline form, usu. colourless, the hardest natural substance known; diamond.

3) [noun] a kind of fish.

4) [noun] (pros.) a metrical foot consisting of three short syllables; tribrach.

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Kuḷiśa (ಕುಳಿಶ):—

1) [noun] (myth.) the bolt or missile of Indra, the Chief of gods; the thunder-bolt.

2) [noun] a mineral consisting of nearly pure carbon in crystalline form, usu. colourless, the hardest natural substance known; diamond.

3) [noun] a kind of fish.

4) [noun] (pros.) a metrical foot consisting of three short syllables; tribrach.

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Kuḷisa (ಕುಳಿಸ):—[noun] = ಕುಳಿಶ - [kulisha -] 1 & 2.

context information

Kannada is a Dravidian language (as opposed to the Indo-European language family) mainly spoken in the southwestern region of India.

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