Kukara, Kukārā: 10 definitions

Introduction:

Kukara means something in Hinduism, Sanskrit, Marathi. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

In Hinduism

Shaivism (Shaiva philosophy)

Source: Wisdom Library: Kubjikāmata-tantra

Kukārā (कुकारा):—Name of one of the six deities which together form the third of the six groups of the aṣṭāviṃśatikrama (one of the main components in the worship of Kubjikā). This group of six deities is also referred to as ‘the auspicious six’ (anugraha-ṣaṭka) and is located in the Ghaṭasthāna. Their names are referred to in the kubjikāmata-tantra but actually described in the Ṣaṭsāhasra-saṃhitā.

Shaivism book cover
context information

Shaiva (शैव, śaiva) or Shaivism (śaivism) represents a tradition of Hinduism worshiping Shiva as the supreme being. Closely related to Shaktism, Shaiva literature includes a range of scriptures, including Tantras, while the root of this tradition may be traced back to the ancient Vedas.

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Shaktism (Shakta philosophy)

Source: Google Books: Manthanabhairavatantram

Kukārā (कुकारा) is a name for the Goddess, according to the Mālinīstava of the Siddhakhaṇḍa in the Manthānabhairavatantra, a vast sprawling work that belongs to a corpus of Tantric texts concerned with the worship of the goddess Kubjikā.—Accordingly, “She who, having contracted (herself), enters (into the body) (and is bent over) is (the goddess whose name begins with) Ku (kukārā). It is for this reason that she is said to be (Kubjikā, the Bent One). She is present in all living beings within the process of the union of the vital breath (prāṇayogakrama) (which serves to vitalize the body) of embodied beings. O mistress of the god of the gods, she is Sound and resides in the Void (of consciousness) (kha).”.

Shaktism book cover
context information

Shakta (शाक्त, śākta) or Shaktism (śāktism) represents a tradition of Hinduism where the Goddess (Devi) is revered and worshipped. Shakta literature includes a range of scriptures, including various Agamas and Tantras, although its roots may be traced back to the Vedas.

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Languages of India and abroad

Marathi-English dictionary

Source: DDSA: The Molesworth Marathi and English Dictionary

kukara (कुकर).—m (kukkura S through H) A dog.

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kukārā (कुकारा).—m (Imit.) Hallooing; a shout or loud call to. v ghāla.

Source: DDSA: The Aryabhusan school dictionary, Marathi-English

kukara (कुकर).—m A dog.

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kukārā (कुकारा).—m Hallooing; a shout.

context information

Marathi is an Indo-European language having over 70 million native speakers people in (predominantly) Maharashtra India. Marathi, like many other Indo-Aryan languages, evolved from early forms of Prakrit, which itself is a subset of Sanskrit, one of the most ancient languages of the world.

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Sanskrit dictionary

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Shabda-Sagara Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Kukara (कुकर).—mfn.

(-raḥ-rā-rī-raṃ) 1. Having a crooked or withered arm. 2. Wicked, acting wickedly. E. ku bad, and kara the hand; or kṛ to do, ṭa aff.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Monier-Williams Sanskrit-English Dictionary

1) Kukara (कुकर):—[=ku-kara] [from ku] a mfn. having a crooked or withered hand, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

2) [=ku-kara] b etc. See 1. ku.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Yates Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Kukara (कुकर):—[ku-kara] (raḥ-rā-raṃ) a. Having a crooked or withered arm; wicked.

[Sanskrit to German]

Kukara in German

context information

Sanskrit, also spelled संस्कृतम् (saṃskṛtam), is an ancient language of India commonly seen as the grandmother of the Indo-European language family (even English!). Closely allied with Prakrit and Pali, Sanskrit is more exhaustive in both grammar and terms and has the most extensive collection of literature in the world, greatly surpassing its sister-languages Greek and Latin.

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Kannada-English dictionary

Source: Alar: Kannada-English corpus

Kukara (ಕುಕರ):—

1) [noun] a crooked or short arm.

2) [noun] a man with such an arm.

3) [noun] a wicked man.

context information

Kannada is a Dravidian language (as opposed to the Indo-European language family) mainly spoken in the southwestern region of India.

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