Kuberadatta, Kuberadattā, Kubera-datta: 7 definitions

Introduction:

Kuberadatta means something in Hinduism, Sanskrit, Jainism, Prakrit. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

In Hinduism

Kavya (poetry)

[«previous next»] — Kuberadatta in Kavya glossary
Source: Wisdom Library: Kathāsaritsāgara

Kuberadatta (कुबेरदत्त) or Kuveradatta is the name of a great warrior (mahāratha) who fought on Śrutaśarman’s side in the war against Sūryaprabha, according to the Kathāsaritsāgara, chapter 48. Accordingly: “... while Indra was saying this [to sage Nārada], fourteen great warriors came to assist the general Dāmodara: [Kuberadatta and others]. And those fifteen heroes, joined with Dāmodara, fighting in front of the line, kept off the followers of Sūryaprabha”.

The story of Kuberadatta was narrated by the Vidyādhara king Vajraprabha to prince Naravāhanadatta in order to relate how “Sūryaprabha, being a man, obtain of old time the sovereignty over the Vidyādharas”.

The Kathāsaritsāgara (‘ocean of streams of story’), mentioning Kuberadatta, is a famous Sanskrit epic story revolving around prince Naravāhanadatta and his quest to become the emperor of the vidyādharas (celestial beings). The work is said to have been an adaptation of Guṇāḍhya’s Bṛhatkathā consisting of 100,000 verses, which in turn is part of a larger work containing 700,000 verses.

Source: OpenEdition books: Vividhatīrthakalpaḥ (Kāvya)

Kuberadattā (कुबेरदत्ता) is mentioned in the Vividhatīrthakalpa by Jinaprabhasūri (13th century A.D.): an ancient text devoted to various Jaina holy places (tīrthas).—Accordingly, “Kuberadattā and Kuberadatta are two twins who were abandoned by their mother, the courtesan Kuberaseṇā. Ignoring their identity, they got married. [...]”.

Cf.  Vasudevahiṇḍi 10.27-12.12; Paris. II v. 280-311: Hertel 1908 p. 74-77.

Kavya book cover
context information

Kavya (काव्य, kavya) refers to Sanskrit poetry, a popular ancient Indian tradition of literature. There have been many Sanskrit poets over the ages, hailing from ancient India and beyond. This topic includes mahakavya, or ‘epic poetry’ and natya, or ‘dramatic poetry’.

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In Jainism

General definition (in Jainism)

[«previous next»] — Kuberadatta in Jainism glossary
Source: archive.org: Trisastisalakapurusacaritra

Kuberadatta (कुबेरदत्त) is the name of an ancient king, according to the Jain Ramayana and chapter 7.4 [Rāma and Lakṣmaṇa] of Hemacandra’s 11th century Triṣaṣṭiśalākāpuruṣacaritra: an ancient Sanskrit epic poem narrating the history and legends of sixty-three illustrious persons in Jainism.—Accordingly, “Siṃharatha’s son, Brahmaratha, became king next, then Cāturmukha, Hemaratha, Śataratha, Udayapṛthu, Vāriratha, Induratha, Ādityaratha, Māndhātṛ, Vīrasena in turn, King Pratimanyu, King Pratibandhu, King Ravimanyu, Vasantatilaka, Kuberadatta, Kunthu, Śarabha, Dvirada in turn, then Siṃhadaśana, Hiraṇyakaśipu, Puñjasthala, Kakutstha, Raghu. Among these kings some reached emancipation and some heaven”.

Source: academia.edu: Tessitori Collection I

1) Kuberadattā (कुबेरदत्ता) or Kuberadattākathā refers to one of the 157 stories embedded in the Kathāmahodadhi by Somacandra (narrating stories from Jain literature, based on the Karpūraprakara), which is included in the collection of manuscripts at the ‘Vincenzo Joppi’ library, collected by Luigi Pio Tessitori during his visit to Rajasthan between 1914 and 1919.—The Kathāmahodadhi represents a repository of 157 stories [e.g., Kuberadattā-kathā] written in prose Sanskrit, although each of them is preceded by a verse. Together, they stage a large number of Jain characters (including early teachers). [...]

2) Kuberadatta (कुबेरदत्त) and Kuberadattā were the children of Kuberasenā: a courtezan from Mathurā, according to the “Aṭhārā nātā ko coḍhālyo” (dealing with the Ethics section of Jain Canonical literature).—The title [Aṭhārā nātā ko coḍhālyo] means “poem on the 18 kinships”. They are at the heart of the story which is in the background.—“The courtezan Kuberasenā, who lived in Mathurā, had twin children, Kuberadatta and Kuberadattā, whom she had to abandon after birth. They were brought up by merchants in Soriyapura, who wanted to marry them to each other. The girl suspected that this would imply an incestuous relationship as her brother and herself had identical rings. She gave up worldly life and became a nun. Later on, she went to Mathurā with the wish to awaken her family.[...]”.

General definition book cover
context information

Jainism is an Indian religion of Dharma whose doctrine revolves around harmlessness (ahimsa) towards every living being. The two major branches (Digambara and Svetambara) of Jainism stimulate self-control (or, shramana, ‘self-reliance’) and spiritual development through a path of peace for the soul to progess to the ultimate goal.

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Languages of India and abroad

Sanskrit dictionary

[«previous next»] — Kuberadatta in Sanskrit glossary
Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Monier-Williams Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Kuberadatta (कुबेरदत्त):—[=kubera-datta] [from kubera] m. Name of a mythical being, [Kathāsaritsāgara]

[Sanskrit to German]

Kuberadatta in German

context information

Sanskrit, also spelled संस्कृतम् (saṃskṛtam), is an ancient language of India commonly seen as the grandmother of the Indo-European language family (even English!). Closely allied with Prakrit and Pali, Sanskrit is more exhaustive in both grammar and terms and has the most extensive collection of literature in the world, greatly surpassing its sister-languages Greek and Latin.

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