Kshudraka, Kṣudraka: 11 definitions

Introduction:

Kshudraka means something in Hinduism, Sanskrit, the history of ancient India. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

The Sanskrit term Kṣudraka can be transliterated into English as Ksudraka or Kshudraka, using the IAST transliteration scheme (?).

In Hinduism

Purana and Itihasa (epic history)

[«previous next»] — Kshudraka in Purana glossary
Source: Wisdom Library: Bhagavata Purana

Kṣudraka (क्षुद्रक):—Son of Prasenajit (son of Lāṅgala). He will be born in the future and become a king. He will have a son called Raṇaka. (see Bhāgavata Purāṇa 9.12.14-15)

Source: archive.org: Puranic Encyclopedia

Kṣudraka (क्षुद्रक).—There was a country known as Kṣudraka in Ancient India. Those who inhabited this country were called Kṣudrakas. It is stated in Mahābhārata, Sabhā Parva, Chapter 52 that the Kṣudrakas had brought gifts to Dharmaputra. In the battle of Bhārata Duryodhana protected Śakuni with the help of the Kṣudrakas. (Bhīṣma Parva, Chapter 51, Stanza 16). It is stated in Mahābhārata, Bhīṣma Parva, Chapter 19 that the Kṣudrakas attacked Arjuna at the behest of Bhīṣma. Many Kṣudrakas were killed when Paraśurāma exterminated the Kṣatriyas. (Mahābhārata Droṇa Parva, Chapter 70).

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: The Purana Index

Kṣudraka (क्षुद्रक).—A son of Prasenajit and father of Raṇaka. (Kuṇḍaka, Viṣṇu-purāṇa). (Kṣulika, Vāyu-purāṇa).*

  • * Bhāgavata-purāṇa IX. 12. 14-15; Matsya-purāṇa 271. 13; Vāyu-purāṇa 99. 289; Viṣṇu-purāṇa IV. 22. 9.
Source: JatLand: List of Mahabharata people and places

Kṣudraka (क्षुद्रक) is a name mentioned in the Mahābhārata (cf. II.48.14, VI.47.16, VI.83.7, VIII.4.46) and represents one of the many proper names used for people and places. Note: The Mahābhārata (mentioning Kṣudraka) is a Sanskrit epic poem consisting of 100,000 ślokas (metrical verses) and is over 2000 years old.

Purana book cover
context information

The Purana (पुराण, purāṇas) refers to Sanskrit literature preserving ancient India’s vast cultural history, including historical legends, religious ceremonies, various arts and sciences. The eighteen mahapuranas total over 400,000 shlokas (metrical couplets) and date to at least several centuries BCE.

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India history and geography

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Indian Epigraphical Glossary

Kṣudraka.—(CII 1), a person of a low position; a poor man. (JNSI, Vol. XVI, p. 44), same as tolaka or draṃkṣaṇa; also spelt kṣudrama. Note: kṣudraka is defined in the “Indian epigraphical glossary” as it can be found on ancient inscriptions commonly written in Sanskrit, Prakrit or Dravidian languages.

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Kṣudraka.—same as draṃkṣaṇa or tola (q. v.); cf. kṣudrama. Note: kṣudraka is defined in the “Indian epigraphical glossary” as it can be found on ancient inscriptions commonly written in Sanskrit, Prakrit or Dravidian languages.

India history book cover
context information

The history of India traces the identification of countries, villages, towns and other regions of India, as well as royal dynasties, rulers, tribes, local festivities and traditions and regional languages. Ancient India enjoyed religious freedom and encourages the path of Dharma, a concept common to Buddhism, Hinduism, and Jainism.

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Languages of India and abroad

Sanskrit dictionary

[«previous next»] — Kshudraka in Sanskrit glossary
Source: DDSA: The practical Sanskrit-English dictionary

Kṣudraka (क्षुद्रक).—

1) One who disregards; तस्माद्राजानो नावमन्तव्याः इति क्षुद्रकान् प्रतिषेधयेत् (tasmādrājāno nāvamantavyāḥ iti kṣudrakān pratiṣedhayet) Kau. A.1.13.

2) A kind of arrow; अथैनं पञ्चविंशत्या क्षुद्रकाणां समार्पयत् (athainaṃ pañcaviṃśatyā kṣudrakāṇāṃ samārpayat) Mb.6.45.23. -a. Small, minute; Ms.8.297.

Derivable forms: kṣudrakaḥ (क्षुद्रकः).

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Benfey Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Kṣudraka (क्षुद्रक).—[kṣudra + ka], I. adj. 1. Very little (young), [Mānavadharmaśāstra] 8, 297. 2. Short (of breath), [Suśruta] 2, 497, 7. Ii. m. 1. pl. The name of a people, Mahābhārata 2, 1871. 2. The name of a prince, [Bhāgavata-Purāṇa, (ed. Burnouf.)] 9, 12, 14.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Monier-Williams Sanskrit-English Dictionary

1) Kṣudraka (क्षुद्रक):—[from kṣud] mfn. small, minute, [Manu-smṛti viii, 297]

2) [v.s. ...] short (as the breath), [Suśruta]

3) [v.s. ...] m. Name of a prince (son of Prasenajit), [Bhāgavata-purāṇa ix, 12, 14; Viṣṇu-purāṇa] ([varia lectio] kṣudra-baka)

4) [v.s. ...] m. [plural] Name of a people living by warfare (the *᾿οξυδρακοι), [Mahābhārata ii, 1871; vi, 2106; Pāṇini 5-3, 114; Kāśikā-vṛtti]

5) [from kṣud] n. Name of a collection of Buddhist works.

[Sanskrit to German]

Kshudraka in German

context information

Sanskrit, also spelled संस्कृतम् (saṃskṛtam), is an ancient language of India commonly seen as the grandmother of the Indo-European language family (even English!). Closely allied with Prakrit and Pali, Sanskrit is more exhaustive in both grammar and terms and has the most extensive collection of literature in the world, greatly surpassing its sister-languages Greek and Latin.

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Kannada-English dictionary

[«previous next»] — Kshudraka in Kannada glossary
Source: Alar: Kannada-English corpus

Kṣudraka (ಕ್ಷುದ್ರಕ):—[adjective] = ಕ್ಷುದ್ರ [kshudra]1 - 1 & 2.

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Kṣudraka (ಕ್ಷುದ್ರಕ):—

1) [noun] = ಕ್ಷುದ್ರ [kshudra]2 - 10.

2) [noun] a kind of lung disease.

context information

Kannada is a Dravidian language (as opposed to the Indo-European language family) mainly spoken in the southwestern region of India.

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