Kshudh, Kshud, Kshut, Kṣud, Kṣudh, Kṣut: 30 definitions

Introduction:

Kshudh means something in Buddhism, Pali, Hinduism, Sanskrit. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

The Sanskrit terms Kṣud and Kṣudh and Kṣut can be transliterated into English as Ksud or Kshud or Ksudh or Kshudh or Ksut or Kshut, using the IAST transliteration scheme (?).

In Hinduism

Ayurveda (science of life)

Source: archive.org: Vagbhata’s Ashtanga Hridaya Samhita (first 5 chapters)

Kṣudh (क्षुध्) refers to “hunger”, as mentioned in verse 5.21-23 of the Aṣṭāṅgahṛdayasaṃhitā (Sūtrasthāna) by Vāgbhaṭa.—Accordingly, “[...] among the (different kinds of milk [viz., payas]), cow’s milk [viz., gavya] (is) a vitalizer (and) elixir; (it is) wholesome for pulmonary rupture and pulmonary consumption, intellectualizing, invigorative, productive of breast-milk, (and) purgative, (and) destroys fatigue, giddiness, intoxication, unbeautifulness, dyspnea, cough, excessive thirst, hunger [viz., kṣudh], old fever, strangury, and hemorrhage [...]”.

Note: Atitṛṣ (“excessive thirst”) has been interchanged with kṣudh (“hunger”) and simplified to skom (“thirst”).

Source: gurumukhi.ru: Ayurveda glossary of terms

Kṣut (क्षुत्):—Hunger

Ayurveda book cover
context information

Āyurveda (आयुर्वेद, ayurveda) is a branch of Indian science dealing with medicine, herbalism, taxology, anatomy, surgery, alchemy and related topics. Traditional practice of Āyurveda in ancient India dates back to at least the first millenium BC. Literature is commonly written in Sanskrit using various poetic metres.

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Jyotisha (astronomy and astrology)

Source: Wisdom Library: Brihat Samhita by Varahamihira

Kṣudh (क्षुध्) refers to “starvation”, according to the Bṛhatsaṃhitā (chapter 3), an encyclopedic Sanskrit work written by Varāhamihira mainly focusing on the science of ancient Indian astronomy astronomy (Jyotiṣa).—Accordingly, “The dark spots, also known as ketus, the sons of Rāhu are Tāmasa, Kīlaka and the like, and are 33 in number. How they affect the earth depends upon their color, position and shape. [...] Even Ṛṣis, reduced to mere skeletons by starvation [i.e., kṣudh], giving up their pious course of life, with fleshless infants in their arms. Deprived of their property by highway men, with long sighs, closed eyes, emaciated bodies, and with their sight dimmed with the tears of sorrow will proceed with difficulty to other lands”.

Jyotisha book cover
context information

Jyotisha (ज्योतिष, jyotiṣa or jyotish) refers to ‘astronomy’ or “Vedic astrology” and represents the fifth of the six Vedangas (additional sciences to be studied along with the Vedas). Jyotisha concerns itself with the study and prediction of the movements of celestial bodies, in order to calculate the auspicious time for rituals and ceremonies.

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In Buddhism

Mahayana (major branch of Buddhism)

Source: Wisdom Library: Maha Prajnaparamita Sastra

Kṣudh (क्षुध्, “hunger”) refers to one of the various “outer torments”, according to Mahāprajñāpāramitāśāstra (chapter XV).—Accordingly, “There are two kinds of torments (alpābādatā), those having an external cause and those having an internal cause. The external torments are cold (śīta), heat (uṣṇa), hunger (kṣudh), thirst (pipāsā), armies (caturaṅgabala), swords (asi), knives (śastra), clubs (daṇḍa), catastrophes (patana), ruins (avamardana); all these external accidents of this kind are called torments (ādādha). The inner torments are the 404 illnesses (vyādhi) that come from improper food or irregular sleep; all the sicknesses of this kind are called inner sicknesses. Corporeal beings (dehin) all have to suffer from these two kinds of illnesses. This is why Ratnakāra asks Śākyamuni if he has but little torments and suffering”.

Source: academia.edu: A Study and Translation of the Gaganagañjaparipṛcchā

Kṣudh (क्षुध्) refers to “hunger”, according to the Gaganagañjaparipṛcchā: the eighth chapter of the Mahāsaṃnipāta (a collection of Mahāyāna Buddhist Sūtras).—Accordingly: “Then the Bodhisattva named Kālarāja addressed himself to the Bodhisattva Gaganagañja: ‘In this Saha universe, son of good family, there are living beings suffering from poverty, lacking food or drink, and wearing ragged clothes; there are hungry ghosts tormented by hunger and thirst (kṣudh-pipāsā), covering themselves with their hairs, and subsisting on such as spittle, mucus, blood, and pus. In order to protect these living beings, please pour down the rain of food, drink, and clothing!’ [...]”.

Mahayana book cover
context information

Mahayana (महायान, mahāyāna) is a major branch of Buddhism focusing on the path of a Bodhisattva (spiritual aspirants/ enlightened beings). Extant literature is vast and primarely composed in the Sanskrit language. There are many sūtras of which some of the earliest are the various Prajñāpāramitā sūtras.

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Languages of India and abroad

Sanskrit dictionary

Source: DDSA: The practical Sanskrit-English dictionary

Kṣut (क्षुत्).—f., A sneeze or sneezing; क्षुतमिवोपशुश्रुवे (kṣutamivopaśuśruve) Śi.15.91.

-janikā (kṣunikā) Mustard.

See also (synonyms): kṣuta, kṣuti.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Cappeller Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Kṣudh (क्षुध्).—1. kṣudhyati [participle] kṣudhita be hungry.

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Kṣudh (क्षुध्).—2. [feminine] hunger.

Source: DDSA: Paia-sadda-mahannavo; a comprehensive Prakrit Hindi dictionary (S)

Kṣudh (क्षुध्) in the Sanskrit language is related to the Prakrit words: Khuṃda, Khudhā, Khumma, Khuhā, Chuhā, Dhukka.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Yates Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Kṣudh (क्षुध्):—(t) 5. f. Hunger.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Yates Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Kṣud (क्षुद्):—(ña, au, ira) kṣuṇatti kṣutte 7. c. To pound, to bruise, to break.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Yates Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Kṣut (क्षुत्):—(t) 5. f. Sneezing.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Monier-Williams Sanskrit-English Dictionary

1) Kṣudh (क्षुध्):—1. kṣudh [class] 4. [Parasmaipada] kṣudhyati (p. kṣudhyat; [imperfect tense] akṣudhyat; [Aorist] [subjunctive] kṣudhat; [future] 1st kṣoddhā, [Pāṇini 7-2, 10; Siddhānta-kaumudī]; [indeclinable participle] kṣudhitvā, [Pāṇini 7-2, 52; Bhaṭṭi-kāvya ix, 39]), to feel hungry, be hungry, [Ṛg-veda i, 104, 7; Atharva-veda ii, 29, 4; Taittirīya-saṃhitā v, 5, 10, 6; vii, 4, 3, 1; Bhaṭṭi-kāvya]

2) 2. kṣudh f. hunger, [Ṛg-veda; Atharva-veda etc.]

Source: DDSA: The practical Sanskrit-English dictionary

Kṣud (क्षुद्).—7 U. (kṣuṇatti, kṣunte, kṣuṇṇa)

1) To tread or trample upon, strike against, crush (under the foot), bruise, pound down; क्षुणद्मि सर्पान् पाताले (kṣuṇadmi sarpān pātāle) Bk.6.36; ते तं व्याशिषता- क्षौत्सुः पादैर्दन्तैस्तथाच्छिदन् (te taṃ vyāśiṣatā- kṣautsuḥ pādairdantaistathācchidan) 15.43;17.66.

2) To move, be agitated (Ā.); क्षोदन्तं आपो रिणते वनानि (kṣodantaṃ āpo riṇate vanāni) Rv.5.58.6. -With

-pra to crush, bruise, pound; मित्रघ्नस्य प्रचुक्षोद गदयाङ्गं विभीषणः (mitraghnasya pracukṣoda gadayāṅgaṃ vibhīṣaṇaḥ) Bk.14.33.

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Kṣud (क्षुद्).—f. Grinding, crushing.

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Kṣud (क्षुद्).—f. [kṣudhā],

1) Hunger; सीदति क्षुधा (sīdati kṣudhā) Ms.7.134,4.187.

2) Food.

 

See also (synonyms): kṣudhā.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Monier-Williams Sanskrit-English Dictionary

1) Kṣut (क्षुत्):—[from kṣu] 1a f. a sneeze, sneezing, [Mārkaṇḍeya-purāṇa xxxv, 24.]

2) 1b kṣuta, etc. See √1. kṣu.

3) 2a for 2, kṣudh q.v.

4) [from kṣudh] 2b (in [compound] for 2. kṣudh).

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Monier-Williams Sanskrit-English Dictionary

1) Kṣud (क्षुद्):—1. kṣud [class] 1. [Parasmaipada] kṣodati, to strike against, shake, [Ṛg-veda vii, 85, 1] ([Naighaṇṭuka, commented on by Yāska ii, 14]);—[Ātmanepada] to move, be agitated or shaken, [Ṛg-veda v, 58, 6] : [class] 7. [Ātmanepada] [Parasmaipada] kṣuṇatti, kṣuntte ([imperfect tense] akṣuṇat; [Aorist] 3. [plural] akṣautsur; [future] kṣotsyati, [Pāṇini 7-2, 10; Siddhānta-kaumudī]),

—to stamp or trample upon, [Bhaṭṭi-kāvya] :—[Causal] kṣodayati ([imperfect tense] akṣodayat), to shake or agitate by stamping, [Ṛg-veda iv, 19, 4];

—to crush, pound, pulverise, [Suśruta];

— ([Nominal verb] [Parasmaipada] [from] kṣudra) to reduce, diminish, [Bhaṭṭi-kāvya xviii, 26];

2) cf. [Greek] ξύω, ξέω for ξέϝω, ξυστός, ξεστός; [Lithuanian] skausti ?

3) 2. kṣud See 1. kṣut and √1. kṣudh.

4) [from kṣudh] a (in [compound] for 2. kṣudh).

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Cappeller Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Kṣud (क्षुद्).—kṣodati [participle] kṣuṇa (q.v.) pound, shatter, shake, stamp upon, dash to pieces. [Causative] kṣodayati shake, crush.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Cappeller Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Kṣut (क्षुत्).—[feminine] sneeze, sneezing.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Benfey Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Kṣudh (क्षुध्).—i. 4, kṣudhya, [Parasmaipada.] To be hungry; kṣudhita, Hungry, [Rāmāyaṇa] 3, 16, 24.

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Kṣudh (क्षुध्).—f. Hunger, [Mānavadharmaśāstra] 7, 134.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Benfey Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Kṣud (क्षुद्).—ii. 7, kṣuṇad, kṣund, [Parasmaipada.], [Ātmanepada.] To pound.

— Ptcple. of the pf. pass., kṣuṇṇa, 1. Pounded, [Pañcatantra] 160, 3. 2. Scattered, Mahābhārata 3, 678. 3. Exercised, [Suśruta] 2, 139, 12.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Shabda-Sagara Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Kṣudh (क्षुध्).—[(ḷ au) aukṣadhḷ] r. 4th cl. (kṣudhyati) To be hungry, to hunger.

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Kṣudh (क्षुध्).—f. (-kṣut or kṣud) Hunger. E. kṣudh to be hungry, affix kvip.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Shabda-Sagara Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Kṣud (क्षुद्).—[(ña, ira, au) au kṣudira] r. 7th cl. (kṣuṇatti, kṣutte) To pound, to bruise, to reduce, to powder.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Shabda-Sagara Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Kṣut (क्षुत्).—f. (-kṣut) 1. Sneezing; also kṣuta. E. kṣu to sneeze, affix kkip, tuk is added.

Source: DDSA: The practical Sanskrit-English dictionary

Kṣudh (क्षुध्).—4 P. (kṣudhyati, kṣudhita) To be hungry; क्षुध्यन्तोऽप्यघसन्व्यालास्तामपालां कथं न वा (kṣudhyanto'pyaghasanvyālāstāmapālāṃ kathaṃ na vā) Bk.5.66,6.44,9.39.

Source: DDSA: Paia-sadda-mahannavo; a comprehensive Prakrit Hindi dictionary (S)

Kṣud (क्षुद्) in the Sanskrit language is related to the Prakrit word: Chu.

[Sanskrit to German]

Kshudh in German

context information

Sanskrit, also spelled संस्कृतम् (saṃskṛtam), is an ancient language of India commonly seen as the grandmother of the Indo-European language family (even English!). Closely allied with Prakrit and Pali, Sanskrit is more exhaustive in both grammar and terms and has the most extensive collection of literature in the world, greatly surpassing its sister-languages Greek and Latin.

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