Kshoni, Kṣoṇī, Kṣoni, Kṣoṇi: 10 definitions

Introduction

Introduction:

Kshoni means something in Hinduism, Sanskrit, the history of ancient India, Marathi. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

The Sanskrit terms Kṣoṇī and Kṣoni and Kṣoṇi can be transliterated into English as Ksoni or Kshoni, using the IAST transliteration scheme (?).

In Hinduism

Shaivism (Shaiva philosophy)

Source: Wisdom Library: Kubjikāmata-tantra

Kṣoṇī (क्षोणी):—One of the four principal Devīs out of the twenty total, who form the Devīcakra, according to the Kubjikāmatatantra. Together they symbolize the twenty lower Sāṃkhya categories which are the five gross elements (mahābhūta), the five subtle elements (tanmātra), the five faculties of perception (buddhīndriyas) and the five faculties of action (karmendriyas).

Kṣoṇī represents the element ‘earth’, but is also connected to the remaining four gross elements, ‘water’, ‘fire’, ‘air’ and ‘ether’.

She is related with the Niyāmikā-kalā (niyāmikā bhavet pṛthvī).

She is identified with the nasal consonant ṅa (ङ).

Mental image: her colour is yellow. She has one face, three eyes and four arms which hold a lotus and a thunderbolt on the right side (padmavajradharā dakṣe) while one of the left arms holds a rosary; the other left one makes the gesture of knowledge (jñānasūtraṃ ca vāmake). She is seated on a lotus and is adorned with many ornaments. (See the Śrīmatottara-tantra and the Gorakṣa-saṃhitā (Kādiprakaraṇa))

Shaivism book cover
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Shaiva (शैव, śaiva) or Shaivism (śaivism) represents a tradition of Hinduism worshiping Shiva as the supreme being. Closely related to Shaktism, Shaiva literature includes a range of scriptures, including Tantras, while the root of this tradition may be traced back to the ancient Vedas.

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Purana and Itihasa (epic history)

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: The Purana Index

Kṣoni (क्षोनि).—Was instructed in vāraha purāṇa by Hari.*

  • * Matsya-purāṇa 53. 39.
Purana book cover
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The Purana (पुराण, purāṇas) refers to Sanskrit literature preserving ancient India’s vast cultural history, including historical legends, religious ceremonies, various arts and sciences. The eighteen mahapuranas total over 400,000 shlokas (metrical couplets) and date to at least several centuries BCE.

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India history and geogprahy

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Indian Epigraphical Glossary

Kṣoṇī.—(IE 7-1-2), ‘one’. Note: kṣoṇī is defined in the “Indian epigraphical glossary” as it can be found on ancient inscriptions commonly written in Sanskrit, Prakrit or Dravidian languages.

India history book cover
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The history of India traces the identification of countries, villages, towns and other regions of India, as well as royal dynasties, rulers, tribes, local festivities and traditions and regional languages. Ancient India enjoyed religious freedom and encourages the path of Dharma, a concept common to Buddhism, Hinduism, and Jainism.

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Languages of India and abroad

Marathi-English dictionary

Source: DDSA: The Molesworth Marathi and English Dictionary

kṣōṇī (क्षोणी).—f S The earth.

Source: DDSA: The Aryabhusan school dictionary, Marathi-English

kṣōṇī (क्षोणी).—f The earth.

context information

Marathi is an Indo-European language having over 70 million native speakers people in (predominantly) Maharashtra India. Marathi, like many other Indo-Aryan languages, evolved from early forms of Prakrit, which itself is a subset of Sanskrit, one of the most ancient languages of the world.

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Sanskrit dictionary

Source: DDSA: The practical Sanskrit-English dictionary

Kṣoṇi (क्षोणि) or Kṣoṇī (क्षोणी).—f.

1) The earth; क्षोणीनौकूपदण्डः क्षरदमरसरित्पट्टिकाकेतुदण्डः (kṣoṇīnaukūpadaṇḍaḥ kṣaradamarasaritpaṭṭikāketudaṇḍaḥ) Dk.

2) The number 'one' (in math.).

Derivable forms: kṣoṇiḥ (क्षोणिः).

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Shabda-Sagara Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Kṣoṇi (क्षोणि).—f. (-ṇiḥ or -ṇī) The earth. E. kṣu to sound, aṇi affix, fem affix optionally ṅīp also kṣauṇi.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Benfey Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Kṣoṇi (क्षोणि).—kṣoṇī, f. The earth, [Bhāgavata-Purāṇa, (ed. Burnouf.)] 4, 21, 35; [Rāmāyaṇa] 1, 42, 23 Gorr.

Kṣoṇi can also be spelled as Kṣoṇī (क्षोणी).

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Cappeller Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Kṣoṇi (क्षोणि).—[feminine] ([nominative] ṇīs) woman, wife, [figuratively] the earth; [dual] heaven and earth.

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Kṣoṇī (क्षोणी).—[feminine] ([nominative] kṣoṇīs) woman, wife, [figuratively] the earth; [dual] heaven and earth.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Monier-Williams Sanskrit-English Dictionary

1) Kṣoṇī (क्षोणी):—[from kṣoṇa] a f. ([nominative case] sg. also ṇīs [nominative case] [plural] ṇīs, once ṇayas, [Ṛg-veda x, 22, 9]) a multitude of men, people (as opposed to the chief), [Ṛg-veda]

2) [v.s. ...] the earth, [Rāmāyaṇa i, 42, 23; Bhāgavata-purāṇa v, 18, 28 and viii, 6, 2]

3) [v.s. ...] f.[Vedic or Veda] [nominative case] [dual number] ‘the two sets of people’ id est. the inhabitants of heaven and earth [‘heaven and earth’ [Naighaṇṭuka, commented on by Yāska iii, 30]] [Ṛg-veda ii, 16, 3; viii, 7, 22; 52, 10]; 99, 6.

4) [v.s. ...] [according to] to some also, ‘a [particular] class of goddesses or semi-divine females’; [according to] to others, ‘flood, stream of water or Soma etc.’.

5) Kṣoṇi (क्षोणि):—[from kṣoṇa] f. (= ṇī) the earth, [Bhāgavata-purāṇa iv, 21, 35]

6) [v.s. ...] f. [plural] (ayas) See kṣoṇa.

7) Kṣoṇī (क्षोणी):—[from kṣoṇa] b (f. of ṇa q.v.)

context information

Sanskrit, also spelled संस्कृतम् (saṃskṛtam), is an ancient language of India commonly seen as the grandmother of the Indo-European language family (even English!). Closely allied with Prakrit and Pali, Sanskrit is more exhaustive in both grammar and terms and has the most extensive collection of literature in the world, greatly surpassing its sister-languages Greek and Latin.

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