Kshirasamudra, aka: Kṣīrasamudra, Kshira-samudra; 2 Definition(s)

Introduction

Kshirasamudra means something in Hinduism, Sanskrit. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

The Sanskrit term Kṣīrasamudra can be transliterated into English as Ksirasamudra or Kshirasamudra, using the IAST transliteration scheme (?).

In Hinduism

Purana and Itihasa (epic history)

Kshirasamudra in Purana glossary... « previous · [K] · next »

Kṣīrasamudra (क्षीरसमुद्र).—See kṣīroda, and kṣīrābdhi.*

  • * Bhāgavata-purāṇa X. [65 (v) 24]; Matsya-purāṇa 249. 14 and 20.
Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: The Purana Index
Purana book cover
context information

The Purana (पुराण, purāṇas) refers to Sanskrit literature preserving ancient India’s vast cultural history, including historical legends, religious ceremonies, various arts and sciences. The eighteen mahapuranas total over 400,000 shlokas (metrical couplets) and date to at least several centuries BCE.

Discover the meaning of kshirasamudra or ksirasamudra in the context of Purana from relevant books on Exotic India

Languages of India and abroad

Sanskrit-English dictionary

Kshirasamudra in Sanskrit glossary... « previous · [K] · next »

Kṣīrasamudra (क्षीरसमुद्र).—the sea of milk. यथा भगवता ब्रह्मन्मथितः क्षीरसागरः (yathā bhagavatā brahmanmathitaḥ kṣīrasāgaraḥ) Bhāg.8.5.11.

Derivable forms: kṣīrasamudraḥ (क्षीरसमुद्रः).

Kṣīrasamudra is a Sanskrit compound consisting of the terms kṣīra and samudra (समुद्र). See also (synonyms): kṣīrasāgara.

Source: DDSA: The practical Sanskrit-English dictionary
context information

Sanskrit, also spelled संस्कृतम् (saṃskṛtam), is an ancient language of India commonly seen as the grandmother of the Indo-European language family. Closely allied with Prakrit and Pali, Sanskrit is more exhaustive in both grammar and terms and has the most extensive collection of literature in the world, greatly surpassing its sister-languages Greek and Latin.

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Relevant definitions

Search found 301 related definition(s) that might help you understand this better. Below you will find the 15 most relevant articles:

Kshira
Kṣīra (क्षीर) refers to “milk” representing one of the five Pañcagavya (five cow-products), as ...
Samudra
Samudra (समुद्र).—(1) n. of a Buddhist convert: Divy 376.19 ff.; (2) n. of another convert, in...
Kshiroda
Kṣīroda (क्षीरोद).—m. (-daḥ) The sea of milk. E. kṣīra milk, and uda water: it also implies the...
Kshiravriksha
Kṣīravṛkṣa (क्षीरवृक्ष).—m. (-kṣaḥ) Glomerous fig tree, (Ficus glomerata;) also uḍumbara. E. kṣ...
Kshirabdhi
Kṣīrābdhi (क्षीराब्धि).—m. (-bdhiḥ) The sea of milk, one of the seven seas surrounding as many ...
Samudraphena
Samudraphena (समुद्रफेन).—m. (-naḥ) Cuttle-fish-bone. E. samudra the sea, phena froth or foam.
Samudrakapha
Samudrakapha (समुद्रकफ).—m. (-phaḥ) Cuttle-fish-bone. E. samudra the sea, and kapha phlegm.
Kshirasagara
Kṣīrasāgara (क्षीरसागर).—the sea of milk. यथा भगवता ब्रह्मन्मथितः क्षीरसागरः (yathā bhagavatā b...
Kshirasphatika
Kṣīrasphaṭika (क्षीरस्फटिक).—a precious stone. Derivable forms: kṣīrasphaṭikaḥ (क्षीरस्फटिकः).K...
Samudramekhala
Samudramekhalā (समुद्रमेखला).—f. (-lā) The earth. E. samudra the sea, mekhalā a zone; the seagi...
Kshirapaka
Kṣīrapaka (क्षीरपक).—A variety of inferior gems; Kau. A.2.11.Derivable forms: kṣīrapakaḥ (क्षीर...
Kshirashara
Kṣīraśara (क्षीरशर).—m. (-raḥ) Cream. the surface or skim of milk. E. kṣīra milk, and śara what...
Lavanasamudra
Lavaṇasamudra (लवणसमुद्र).—the saltsea, the ocean.Derivable forms: lavaṇasamudraḥ (लवणसमुद्रः)....
Samudranta
Samudrānta (समुद्रान्त).—n. (-ntaṃ) 1. The nutmeg. 2. The sea-shore. f. (-ntā) 1. A shrub, (Hed...
Kshirahva
Kṣīrāhva (क्षीराह्व).—m. (-hvaḥ) The Saral, a kind of pine. E. kṣīra milk, and āhva what is nam...

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