Kshaudra, Kṣaudra: 13 definitions

Introduction

Introduction:

Kshaudra means something in Hinduism, Sanskrit. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

The Sanskrit term Kṣaudra can be transliterated into English as Ksaudra or Kshaudra, using the IAST transliteration scheme (?).

In Hinduism

Ayurveda (science of life)

Source: Wisdom Library: Āyurveda and botany

Ksaudra (क्सौद्र) refers to a “pale-colored honey” and is used throughout Ayurvedic literature such as the Caraka-saṃhitā. An alkaline substance is a synonym for a soluble base. In the Tibetan language it is known as ‘ser-kya snaṅ-pa’.

Source: archive.org: Vagbhata’s Ashtanga Hridaya Samhita (first 5 chapters)

Kṣaudra (क्षौद्र) refers to “honey”, as mentioned in verse 5.29-31 of the Aṣṭāṅgahṛdayasaṃhitā (Sūtrasthāna) by Vāgbhaṭa.—Accordingly, “[...] Of sour digestion and taste, constipating, heavy, (and) warming (are) curds [viz., dadhi]; Never shall one take them at night, never warm, (and) not in spring, summer, and autumn (in any other season) not without mung-bean soup nor without honey [viz., na-a-kṣaudra] nor without ghee and sugar nor without emblic myrobalans, also not continuously and not slightly unfinished”.

Source: Shodhganga: Dietetics and culinary art in ancient and medieval India

Kṣaudra (क्षौद्र) refers to one of the eight kinds of honey (madhu) according to the Suśrutasaṃhitā Sūtrasthāna 45.133, and is commonly found in literature dealing with the topics of dietetics and culinary art, also known as Pākaśāstra or Pākakalā.—Honey was possibly, the earliest sweet thing Indians knew. [...] According to Suśruta the eight varieties of honey are mākṣika, bhrāmara, kṣaudra, pauttika, chātra, ārghya, auddalika and dāla each of these being obtained from different types of bees. The Aṣṭāṅgasaṅgraha, a medieval period text, states that among the eight varieties of honey bhrāmara, pauttika, kṣaudra and mākṣika are considered good in the increasing order (cf. Sūtrasthāna VI.98).

Kṣaudra is also mentioned as one of the eight kinds of honey (madhu) according to the 17th century Bhojanakutūhala (dravyaguṇāguṇa-kathana). According to the same text, kṣaudra or “honey” is mutually incompatible (viruddhāhāra) with Ānūpamāmṣa (the meat of animals living in marshy lands).

Source: gurumukhi.ru: Ayurveda glossary of terms

Kṣaudra (क्षौद्र):—Variety of honey collected from small type of honey-bee, its of brownish color. Its of ununctuous and astringent taste and cold in potency. It aggravates Vata and alleviator of Pitta.

Ayurveda book cover
context information

Āyurveda (आयुर्वेद, ayurveda) is a branch of Indian science dealing with medicine, herbalism, taxology, anatomy, surgery, alchemy and related topics. Traditional practice of Āyurveda in ancient India dates back to at least the first millenium BC. Literature is commonly written in Sanskrit using various poetic metres.

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Purana and Itihasa (epic history)

[«previous next»] — Kshaudra in Purana glossary
Source: archive.org: Nilamata Purana: a cultural and literary study

Kṣaudra (क्षौद्र) is another name for Madhu (“honey”), forming part of a common diet in ancient Kashmir (Kaśmīra) as mentioned in the Nīlamatapurāṇa.—Honey (Madhu or Kṣaudra) is recommended as an offering to be made to the goddess Śyāmā (verse 800). Various sorts of food preparations sweetened with honey are referred to (verses 503, 691). Another name of honey is Kṣaudra (verse 694). Most of the references to the articles of diet occur in the Nīlamata in connection with the offerings made to the gods but it is not difficult to infer from them the food and drink of the common people because “what a man eats his gods eat”.

Purana book cover
context information

The Purana (पुराण, purāṇas) refers to Sanskrit literature preserving ancient India’s vast cultural history, including historical legends, religious ceremonies, various arts and sciences. The eighteen mahapuranas total over 400,000 shlokas (metrical couplets) and date to at least several centuries BCE.

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Languages of India and abroad

Sanskrit dictionary

Source: DDSA: The practical Sanskrit-English dictionary

Kṣaudra (क्षौद्र).—1 The Champaka tree.

2) Name of a mixed caste; (son of a Vaideha and Māgadhī)

-dram 1 Smallness.

2) Meanness, lowness.

3) Honey; स क्षौद्रपटलैरिव (sa kṣaudrapaṭalairiva) R.4.63.

4) Water.

5) A particle of dust. -a. Small; क्षौद्रालापय कामदं श्रियमृते सैवैकनिष्ठा स्त्रियाम् (kṣaudrālāpaya kāmadaṃ śriyamṛte saivaikaniṣṭhā striyām) Bhāg.1.9.24.

Derivable forms: kṣaudraḥ (क्षौद्रः).

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Shabda-Sagara Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Kṣaudra (क्षौद्र).—n.

(-draṃ) 1. Honey. 2. Water. m.

(-draḥ) A flower, (Michelia champaca.) E. kṣudrā a fly, &c. affix .

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Benfey Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Kṣaudra (क्षौद्र).—i. e. kṣudra + a, I. m. 1. The name of a tree, Michelia campaka, Mahābhārata 3, 11569. 2. The name of a mixed caste, the offspring of a Vaideha man and a Māgadhī woman, Mahābhārata 13, 2584. Ii. n. Honey, [Mānavadharmaśāstra] 10, 88.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Cappeller Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Kṣaudra (क्षौद्र).—[masculine] a cert. tree, [Name] of a caste; [neuter] a species of honey.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Monier-Williams Sanskrit-English Dictionary

1) Kṣaudra (क्षौद्र):—m. ([from] kṣudra and drā), Michelia Campaka, [Mahābhārata iii, 11569]

2) Name of a mixed caste (son of a Vaideha and a Māgadhī), [Mahābhārata xiii, 2584]

3) n. smallness, minuteness [gana] pṛthvādi

4) honey, species of honey, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

5) water, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

6) Name of a Sūtra of the [Sāma-veda]

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Yates Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Kṣaudra (क्षौद्र):—(draṃ) 1. n. Honey; water. m. A flower (Michelia champaca).

[Sanskrit to German] (Deutsch Wörterbuch)

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Böhtlingk and Roth Grosses Petersburger Wörterbuch

Kṣaudra (क्षौद्र):—(von kṣudra und kṣudrā)

1) m. a) Name eines Baumes, Michelia Champaca (campaka), [Śabdacandrikā im Śabdakalpadruma] [Mahābhārata 3, 11569.] — b) Bez. einer Mischlingskaste, der Sohn eines Vaideha und einer Māgadhī [Mahābhārata 13, 2584.] —

2) n. a) oxyt. Kleinheit, Winzigkeit gaṇa pṛthvādi zu [Pāṇini’s acht Bücher 5, 1, 122.] — — b) parox. Honig [Pāṇini’s acht Bücher 4, 3, 119.] [Amarakoṣa 2, 9, 108. 3, 4, 17, 105.] [Hemacandra’s Anekārthasaṃgraha 2, 407.] [Medinīkoṣa Rāmāyaṇa 21.] [Manu’s Gesetzbuch 10, 88.] [Mahābhārata 2, 1861.] [Rāmāyaṇa 2, 26, 13. 3, 77, 3. 5, 59, 20.] [Suśruta 1, 148, 16. 315, 8. 2, 9, 12. 49, 19. 192, 21. 323, 18.] [Bhāgavatapurāṇa 7, 4, 17.] saraghāvyāptaiḥ kṣaudrapaṭalaiḥ [Raghuvaṃśa 4, 63.] te mām samāsiñcanti śāstāraḥ kṣaudraṃ ma dhvava makṣikāḥ [Mahābhārata 13, 2171.] na hi nimbātsravetkṣaudraṃ loke vigaditaṃ vacaḥ [Rāmāyaṇa 2, 35, 15.] eine best. Art von Honig [Suśruta 1, 185, 1. 6.] [Vācaspati] zu [Hemacandra’s Abhidhānacintāmaṇi 1214.] Vgl. u. kṣudrā Biene. — c) Wasser [Hemacandra’s Anekārthasaṃgraha] [Medinīkoṣa]

--- OR ---

Kṣaudra (क्षौद्र):—

2) d) Titel eines Sūtra des [Sāmaveda] [Oxforder Handschriften 377,b, No. 375.]

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Sanskrit-Wörterbuch in kürzerer Fassung

Kṣaudra (क्षौद्र):——

1) m. — a) Michelia Champaca. — b) eine best. Mischlingskaste.

2) n. — a) *Kleinigkeit , Winzigkeit. — b) Honig und eine best. Art von Honig [Rājan 14,114] — c) *Wasser. — d) Titel eines Sūtra des [Sāmaveda (roth). ]

context information

Sanskrit, also spelled संस्कृतम् (saṃskṛtam), is an ancient language of India commonly seen as the grandmother of the Indo-European language family (even English!). Closely allied with Prakrit and Pali, Sanskrit is more exhaustive in both grammar and terms and has the most extensive collection of literature in the world, greatly surpassing its sister-languages Greek and Latin.

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