Kshantiparamita, aka: Kṣāntipāramitā, Kshanti-paramita; 2 Definition(s)

Introduction

Kshantiparamita means something in Buddhism, Pali. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

The Sanskrit term Kṣāntipāramitā can be transliterated into English as Ksantiparamita or Kshantiparamita, using the IAST transliteration scheme (?).

In Buddhism

Mahayana (major branch of Buddhism)

Kshantiparamita in Mahayana glossary... « previous · [K] · next »

Kṣāntipāramitā (क्षान्तिपारमिता) refers to the “virtue of patience” and represents one of the six perfections (pāramitā). How does the Bodhisattva fulfill the virtue of patience (kṣāntipāramitā)? Answer: When people come to insult him, strike him, beat him, slash him, tear off his skin, cut him to pieces and take his life, his mind feels no hatred (dveṣa). Thus, when king Kali cut off his hands (hasta), feet (pāda), ears (karṇa) and nose (nāsā), the Bhikṣu Kṣānti kept a strong mind (dṛḍhacitta) without emotion (acala).

Source: Wisdom Library: Maha Prajnaparamita Sastra
Mahayana book cover
context information

Mahayana (महायान, mahāyāna) is a major branch of Buddhism focusing on the path of a Bodhisattva (spiritual aspirants/ enlightened beings). Extant literature is vast and primarely composed in the Sanskrit language. There are many sūtras of which some of the earliest are the various Prajñāpāramitā sūtras.

Discover the meaning of kshantiparamita or ksantiparamita in the context of Mahayana from relevant books on Exotic India

General definition (in Buddhism)

Kshantiparamita in Buddhism glossary... « previous · [K] · next »

Kṣāntipāramitā (क्षान्तिपारमिता) or simply kṣānti refers to the “perfection of patience” and represents the third of the “six perferctions” (ṣaṭpāramitā) as defined in the Dharma-saṃgraha (section 17). The Dharma-samgraha (Dharmasangraha) is an extensive glossary of Buddhist technical terms in Sanskrit (eg., ṣaṣ-pāramitā and kṣānti-pāramitā). The work is attributed to Nagarjuna who lived around the 2nd century A.D.

Kṣāntipāramitā forms, besides a part of the “six perferctions” (ṣaṭpāramitā), also a part of the “ten perfections” (daśa-pāramitā).

Source: Wisdom Library: Dharma-samgraha

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