Krosha, Krośa: 9 definitions

Introduction

Krosha means something in Hinduism, Sanskrit, the history of ancient India, Marathi. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

The Sanskrit term Krośa can be transliterated into English as Krosa or Krosha, using the IAST transliteration scheme (?).

In Hinduism

General definition (in Hinduism)

Source: archive.org: Vedic index of Names and Subjects

Krośa (क्रोश), as a measure of distance (lit. ‘a shout,’ as expressing the range of the voice), is found in the Pañcaviṃśa Brāhmaṇa.

India history and geogprahy

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Indian Epigraphical Glossary

Krośa.—(CII 1), a distance of about two miles and a quarter. Note: krośa is defined in the “Indian epigraphical glossary” as it can be found on ancient inscriptions commonly written in Sanskrit, Prakrit or Dravidian languages.

India history book cover
context information

The history of India traces the identification of countries, villages, towns and other regions of India, as well as royal dynasties, rulers, tribes, local festivities and traditions and regional languages. Ancient India enjoyed religious freedom and encourages the path of Dharma, a concept common to Buddhism, Hinduism, and Jainism.

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Languages of India and abroad

Marathi-English dictionary

Source: DDSA: The Molesworth Marathi and English Dictionary

krōśa (क्रोश).—m S A kos or cos. See at large under kōsa.

Source: DDSA: The Aryabhusan school dictionary, Marathi-English

krōśa (क्रोश).—m A Kos.

context information

Marathi is an Indo-European language having over 70 million native speakers people in (predominantly) Maharashtra India. Marathi, like many other Indo-Aryan languages, evolved from early forms of Prakrit, which itself is a subset of Sanskrit, one of the most ancient languages of the world.

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Sanskrit-English dictionary

Source: DDSA: The practical Sanskrit-English dictionary

Krośa (क्रोश).—[kruś-ghañ]

1) A cry, yell, shout, scream, noise.

2) A measure of distance equal to 1/4th of a Yojana, a Kośa क्रोशार्धं प्रकृतिपुरःसरेण गत्वा (krośārdhaṃ prakṛtipuraḥsareṇa gatvā) R.13.79; समुद्रात्पुरी क्रोशौ (samudrātpurī krośau) (nom.) or क्रोशयोः (krośayoḥ) (loc.)

3) A measure of time equal to 48 minutes; क्रोशमास्ते । क्रोशं स्वपिति (krośamāste | krośaṃ svapiti) Mahābhārata on P.1. 4.51.

Derivable forms: krośaḥ (क्रोशः).

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Shabda-Sagara Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Krośa (क्रोश).—m.

(-śaḥ) A measure of distance, a league, a Kos, containing 4000 cubits; some double this, and make the Kos 8000 cubits. E. kruś to call, &c, affix ghañ.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Benfey Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Krośa (क्रोश).—i. e. kruś + a, m. 1. Cry (ved.). 2. A measure of distance, containing 4,000 cubits, [Rāmāyaṇa] 2, 90, 1.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Cappeller Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Krośa (क्रोश).—[masculine] shout, yell; calling distance.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Monier-Williams Sanskrit-English Dictionary

1) Krośa (क्रोश):—[from kruś] a m. (cf. klośa) a cry, yell, shriek, shout, [Vājasaneyi-saṃhitā xxx, 19; Taittirīya-saṃhitā vii] (cf. karṇa-k)

2) [v.s. ...] ‘the range of the voice in calling or hallooing’, a measure of distance (an Indian league, commonly called a Kos= 1000 Daṇḍas = 4000 Hastas = 1/4 Yojana; according to others = 2000 Daṇḍas = 8000 Hastas = 1/2 Gavyūti), [Kātyāyana-śrauta-sūtra; Mahābhārata] etc.

3) [v.s. ...] n. ([gana] jvalādi), Name of different Sāmans, [Taittirīya-saṃhitā vii; Lāṭyāyana; Ārṣeya-brāhmaṇa]

4) b etc. See √kruś.

context information

Sanskrit, also spelled संस्कृतम् (saṃskṛtam), is an ancient language of India commonly seen as the grandmother of the Indo-European language family. Closely allied with Prakrit and Pali, Sanskrit is more exhaustive in both grammar and terms and has the most extensive collection of literature in the world, greatly surpassing its sister-languages Greek and Latin.

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