Kritanjali, Kṛtañjalī, Krita-anjali, Kritamjali: 14 definitions

Introduction:

Kritanjali means something in Buddhism, Pali, Hinduism, Sanskrit, Marathi. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

The Sanskrit term Kṛtañjalī can be transliterated into English as Krtanjali or Kritanjali, using the IAST transliteration scheme (?).

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In Hinduism

Ayurveda (science of life)

[«previous next»] — Kritanjali in Ayurveda glossary
Source: Wisdom Library: Āyurveda and botany

Kṛtañjalī (कृतञ्जली) is a Sanskrit word referring to Mimosa pudica, a herb from the Fabaceae (pea) family of flowering plants. English names include “sensitive plant” or “sleepy plant”. It is used throughout Ayurvedic literature such as the Caraka-saṃhitā and the Suśruta-saṃhitā.

This plant (Kṛtañjalī) is also possibly identified with Mūrvā, a medicinal used for the treatment of all major fevers (jvara), as described in the Jvaracikitsā (or “the treatment of fever”) which forms the first chapter of the Sanskrit work called Mādhavacikitsā.

Ayurveda book cover
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Āyurveda (आयुर्वेद, ayurveda) is a branch of Indian science dealing with medicine, herbalism, taxology, anatomy, surgery, alchemy and related topics. Traditional practice of Āyurveda in ancient India dates back to at least the first millenium BC. Literature is commonly written in Sanskrit using various poetic metres.

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Purana and Itihasa (epic history)

[«previous next»] — Kritanjali in Purana glossary
Source: archive.org: Shiva Purana - English Translation

Kṛtāñjali (कृताञ्जलि) refers to the “palms joined in reverence”, according to the Śivapurāṇa 2.2.19. Accordingly as Brahmā narrated to Nārada:—“[...] then Viṣṇu stood up. Approaching Śiva with palms joined in reverence [viz., kṛtāñjali] and accompanied by Lakṣmī, the Garuḍa-vehicled God Viṣṇu spoke thus. [...]”.

Purana book cover
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The Purana (पुराण, purāṇas) refers to Sanskrit literature preserving ancient India’s vast cultural history, including historical legends, religious ceremonies, various arts and sciences. The eighteen mahapuranas total over 400,000 shlokas (metrical couplets) and date to at least several centuries BCE.

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In Buddhism

Tibetan Buddhism (Vajrayana or tantric Buddhism)

Source: archive.org: The Indian Buddhist Iconography

Kṛtāñjali (कृताञ्जलि) or Kṛtāñjalilokeśvara refers to number 98 of the 108 forms of Avalokiteśvara found in the Machhandar Vahal (Kathmanu, Nepal). [Machhandar or Machandar is another name for for Matsyendra.].

Accordingly,—

“Kṛtāñjali is similar to [Piṇḍapātra Lokeśvara] except that here the god exhibits the Añjali against his chest with his two hands.—Piṇḍapātra Lokeśvara is one-faced and two-armed and stands on a lotus. He holds the Piṇḍapātra (the bowl) in his two hands near the navel”.

The names of the 108 deities [viz., Kṛtāñjali] possbily originate from a Tantra included in the Kagyur which is named “the 108 names of Avalokiteshvara”, however it is not yet certain that this is the source for the Nepali descriptions.

Tibetan Buddhism book cover
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Tibetan Buddhism includes schools such as Nyingma, Kadampa, Kagyu and Gelug. Their primary canon of literature is divided in two broad categories: The Kangyur, which consists of Buddha’s words, and the Tengyur, which includes commentaries from various sources. Esotericism and tantra techniques (vajrayāna) are collected indepently.

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Languages of India and abroad

Marathi-English dictionary

[«previous next»] — Kritanjali in Marathi glossary
Source: DDSA: The Molesworth Marathi and English Dictionary

kṛtāñjali (कृतांजलि).—a (S) Having placed the hollowed palms one over the other.

Source: DDSA: The Aryabhusan school dictionary, Marathi-English

kṛtāñjalī (कृतांजली).—a Having placed the hollowed palms one over the other.

context information

Marathi is an Indo-European language having over 70 million native speakers people in (predominantly) Maharashtra India. Marathi, like many other Indo-Aryan languages, evolved from early forms of Prakrit, which itself is a subset of Sanskrit, one of the most ancient languages of the world.

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Sanskrit dictionary

[«previous next»] — Kritanjali in Sanskrit glossary
Source: DDSA: The practical Sanskrit-English dictionary

Kṛtāñjali (कृताञ्जलि).—a. folding the hands in supplication; प्रणम्य शिरसा देवं कृताञ्जलिरभाषत (praṇamya śirasā devaṃ kṛtāñjalirabhāṣata) Bhagavadgītā (Bombay) 11.14,35; Manusmṛti 4.154.

Kṛtāñjali is a Sanskrit compound consisting of the terms kṛta and añjali (अञ्जलि).

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Shabda-Sagara Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Kṛtāñjali (कृताञ्जलि).—mfn. (-liḥ-liḥ-li) One who joins the palms of the hands, making such a sign of reverence or solicitation, reverent, respectful. m.

(-liḥ) A shrub used in medicine, also in magical portions, &c. E. kṛta made, añjali the hand joined, &c.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Benfey Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Kṛtāñjali (कृताञ्जलि).—adj. with humble salutation, [Mānavadharmaśāstra] 4, 154.

Kṛtāñjali is a Sanskrit compound consisting of the terms kṛta and añjali (अञ्जलि).

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Cappeller Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Kṛtāñjali (कृताञ्जलि).—[adjective] humble, suppliant (cf. añjali).

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Monier-Williams Sanskrit-English Dictionary

1) Kṛtāñjali (कृताञ्जलि):—[from kṛta > kṛ] mfn. one who joins the hollowed palms in reverence or to solicit a favour (holding the hollowed palms together as if to receive alms or an offering), standing in a reverent or respectful posture, [Manu-smṛti; Mahābhārata; Rāmāyaṇa]

2) [v.s. ...] m. a shrub used in medicine and in magical potions, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Yates Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Kṛtāñjali (कृताञ्जलि):—[kṛtā+ñjali] (liḥ-li) a. Joining the palms of the hands for making obeisance or holding water. m. A shrub used in medicine and in magical potions.

[Sanskrit to German]

Kritanjali in German

context information

Sanskrit, also spelled संस्कृतम् (saṃskṛtam), is an ancient language of India commonly seen as the grandmother of the Indo-European language family (even English!). Closely allied with Prakrit and Pali, Sanskrit is more exhaustive in both grammar and terms and has the most extensive collection of literature in the world, greatly surpassing its sister-languages Greek and Latin.

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Kannada-English dictionary

[«previous next»] — Kritanjali in Kannada glossary
Source: Alar: Kannada-English corpus

Kṛtāṃjali (ಕೃತಾಂಜಲಿ):—

1) [noun] the hands joined together (as in reverence).

2) [noun] a man who has joined both the palms, expressing reverence, obeisance or supplication.

3) [noun] the sensitive plant Mimosa pudica of Mimosaceae family; touch-me-not plant.

context information

Kannada is a Dravidian language (as opposed to the Indo-European language family) mainly spoken in the southwestern region of India.

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