Krikara, Kṛkarā, Kṛkara: 11 definitions

Introduction

Introduction:

Krikara means something in Hinduism, Sanskrit. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

The Sanskrit terms Kṛkarā and Kṛkara can be transliterated into English as Krkara or Krikara, using the IAST transliteration scheme (?).

In Hinduism

Shaivism (Shaiva philosophy)

Source: Wisdom Library: Kubjikāmata-tantra

Kṛkarā (कृकरा):—Last of the eight Mātṛs born from the body of Calanī, according to the Kubjikāmata-tantra. These eight sub-manifestations (mātṛ), including Kṛkarā, symbolize a relation to the wind. Kṛkarā itself represents kṛkara, one of the five secondary airs of the body. They are presided over by the Bhairava Asitāṅga. Calanī is the fifth of the Eight Mahāmātṛs, residing within the Mātṛcakra (third of the five cakras) and represents wind.

Shaivism book cover
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Shaiva (शैव, śaiva) or Shaivism (śaivism) represents a tradition of Hinduism worshiping Shiva as the supreme being. Closely related to Shaktism, Shaiva literature includes a range of scriptures, including Tantras, while the root of this tradition may be traced back to the ancient Vedas.

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Ayurveda (science of life)

Source: WorldCat: Rāj nighaṇṭu

Kṛkarā (कृकरा) is another name for Pippalī, a medicinal plant identified with Piper longum Linn. or “Indian long pepper” from the Piperaceae or ‘pepper’ family of flowering plants, according to verse 6.11-13 of the 13th-century Raj Nighantu or Rājanighaṇṭu. The sixth chapter (pippalyādi-varga) of this book enumerates ninety-five varieties of plants obtained from the market (paṇyauṣadhi). Together with the names Kṛkarā and Pippalī, there are a total of nineteen Sanskrit synonyms identified for this plant.

Ayurveda book cover
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Āyurveda (आयुर्वेद, ayurveda) is a branch of Indian science dealing with medicine, herbalism, taxology, anatomy, surgery, alchemy and related topics. Traditional practice of Āyurveda in ancient India dates back to at least the first millenium BC. Literature is commonly written in Sanskrit using various poetic metres.

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Languages of India and abroad

Sanskrit dictionary

Source: DDSA: The practical Sanskrit-English dictionary

Kṛkara (कृकर).—

1) A kind of partridge.

2) A worm.

3) An epithet of Śiva.

Derivable forms: kṛkaraḥ (कृकरः).

See also (synonyms): kṛkaṇa.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Shabda-Sagara Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Kṛkara (कृकर).—m.

(-raḥ) 1. A name of Siva. 2. One of the five vital airs, that which assists in digestion. 3. A kind of partridge: see kṛkaṇa. 4. A sort of pepper, (P. chavya.) 5. The oleander tree. E. kṛka the throat, and ra what gets or receives; or kṛ imitative sound, and kara what makes, from kṛ to make or do, affix ap.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Benfey Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Kṛkara (कृकर).—[kṛ-kara] (kṛ is an imitative sound), m. 1. A kind of partridge, [Rāmāyaṇa] 4, 50, 12. 2. One of the five vital airs, that which assists in digestion, [Vedāntasāra, (in my Chrestomathy.)] in Chr. 207, 16.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Cappeller Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Kṛkara (कृकर).—[masculine] a kind of patridge; one of the winds of the body.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Monier-Williams Sanskrit-English Dictionary

1) Kṛkara (कृकर):—m. a kind of partridge (= kṛkaṇa q.v.), [Sāma-vidhāna-brāhmaṇa; Rāmāyaṇa iv, 50, 2]

2) a kind of pepper (Piper Chaba), [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

3) the fragrant oleander tree (?), [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

4) one of the five vital airs (that which assists in digestion), [Vedāntasāra]

5) Name of Śiva, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

6) Kṛkarā (कृकरा):—[from kṛkara] f. long pepper, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Yates Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Kṛkara (कृकर):—[kṛ-kara] (raḥ) 1. m. Shiva; one of the vital airs; a kind of partridge; pepper; the oleander tree.

[Sanskrit to German]

Krikara in German

context information

Sanskrit, also spelled संस्कृतम् (saṃskṛtam), is an ancient language of India commonly seen as the grandmother of the Indo-European language family (even English!). Closely allied with Prakrit and Pali, Sanskrit is more exhaustive in both grammar and terms and has the most extensive collection of literature in the world, greatly surpassing its sister-languages Greek and Latin.

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