Krida, Krīḍā, Krīḍa: 15 definitions

Introduction

Introduction:

Krida means something in Hinduism, Sanskrit, Hindi. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

In Hinduism

Shaivism (Shaiva philosophy)

Source: Wisdom Library: Ṣaṭsāhasra-saṃhitā

Krīḍā (क्रीडा):—One of the twelve guṇas associated with Piṇḍa, the seventh seat of the Svādhiṣṭhāna-chakra. According to tantric sources such as the Śrīmatottara-tantra and the Gorakṣasaṃhitā (Kādiprakaraṇa), these twelve guṇas are represented as female deities. According to the Ṣaṭsāhasrasaṃhitā however, they are explained as particular syllables. They (e.g. Krīḍā) only seem to play an minor role with regard to the interpretation of the Devīcakra (first of five chakras, as taught in the Kubjikāmata-tantra).

Shaivism book cover
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Shaiva (शैव, śaiva) or Shaivism (śaivism) represents a tradition of Hinduism worshiping Shiva as the supreme being. Closely related to Shaktism, Shaiva literature includes a range of scriptures, including Tantras, while the root of this tradition may be traced back to the ancient Vedas.

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Purana and Itihasa (epic history)

Source: archive.org: Shiva Purana - English Translation

Krīḍa (क्रीड) refers to “sport” (i.e., Śiva’s sport with Śivaśakti), according to the Śivapurāṇa 2.2.41.—Accordingly, as Viṣṇu and others eulogized Śiva:—“[...] O great lord, the lord of the gods and the prescriber of worldly conventions, we know you to be Śiva and Brahman, thanks to your favour. [...] You alone create, sustain and annihilate the universe under your control like a spider (weaving its web). You sport (i.e., krīḍa) about with Śivaśakti—your own manifestation”.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: The Purana Index

Krīḍa (क्रीड).—A Rākṣasa.*

  • * Vāyu-purāṇa 69. 166.
Purana book cover
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The Purana (पुराण, purāṇas) refers to Sanskrit literature preserving ancient India’s vast cultural history, including historical legends, religious ceremonies, various arts and sciences. The eighteen mahapuranas total over 400,000 shlokas (metrical couplets) and date to at least several centuries BCE.

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Dharmashastra (religious law)

Source: Knowledge Traditions & Practices of India: Education: Systems & Practices

Krīḍā (क्रीडा) refers to “games and recreational activities” and formed part of the ancient Indian education system, which aimed at both the inner and the outer dimension of a person. Truth, patience, regularity, self-mastery, humility, self-denial, purity of self (sattvaśuddhi), cognition of the underlying unity of life, nature and environment, reverence for all-beings were the inner values cultivated by Indian education.

Dharmashastra book cover
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Dharmashastra (धर्मशास्त्र, dharmaśāstra) contains the instructions (shastra) regarding religious conduct of livelihood (dharma), ceremonies, jurisprudence (study of law) and more. It is categorized as smriti, an important and authoritative selection of books dealing with the Hindu lifestyle.

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Shaktism (Shakta philosophy)

Source: Google Books: Manthanabhairavatantram

Krīḍā (क्रीडा) (cf. Kāmakrīḍā) refers to “play” or “sport” (e.g., the sport of love), according to the second recension of the Yogakhaṇḍa of the Manthānabhairavatantra, a vast sprawling work that belongs to a corpus of Tantric texts concerned with the worship of the goddess Kubjikā.—Accordingly, as the God said to the Goddess, “Today be Bhadrakālī. (It is) I, Śaṃkara who has come. Mutually we play [i.e., krīḍā] up to the end of the cosmic age. (We are) mutually Rati and Kāma (for one another)”.

Shaktism book cover
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Shakta (शाक्त, śākta) or Shaktism (śāktism) represents a tradition of Hinduism where the Goddess (Devi) is revered and worshipped. Shakta literature includes a range of scriptures, including various Agamas and Tantras, although its roots may be traced back to the Vedas.

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Languages of India and abroad

Sanskrit dictionary

Source: DDSA: The practical Sanskrit-English dictionary

Krīḍa (क्रीड).—a. [krīḍ-ghañ] Playing, sporting; क्रीडं (krīḍaṃ) (ḷaṃ) वः शर्धो मारुतम् (vaḥ śardho mārutam) Rv.1.37.1,5.

-ḍaḥ 1 Sport, pastime, play, pleasure.

2) Jest, joke.

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Krīḍā (क्रीडा).—[krīḍ-bhāve a]

1) Sport, pastime, play, pleasure; तोयक्रीडानिरतयुवतिस्नानतिक्तैर्मरुद्भिः (toyakrīḍāniratayuvatisnānatiktairmarudbhiḥ) Me.35,63; क्रीडामुदो यातनाः (krīḍāmudo yātanāḥ) Gīt.9.9.

2) Jest, joke.

3) (in music) A kind of measure.

4) A play-ground; Mb.3.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Shabda-Sagara Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Krīḍa (क्रीड).—mf.

(-ḍaḥ-ḍā) 1. Sport, play, pastime, pleasure, amusement. f.

(-ḍā) 1. Playing, as a ball, &c. 2. Disrespect. E. krīḍ. to play, a affix, and fem. do ṭāp.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Benfey Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Krīḍā (क्रीडा).—[krīḍ + ā], f. 1. Play, [Rāmāyaṇa] 3, 39, 17; jest, [Gītagovinda. ed. Lassen.] 9, 10. 2. Amusement, [Rājataraṅgiṇī] 5, 338.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Cappeller Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Krīḍa (क्रीड).—[adjective] playing, sporting; [feminine] krīḍā play, sport, amusement.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Monier-Williams Sanskrit-English Dictionary

1) Krīḍa (क्रीड):—[from krīḍ] mfn. playing, sporting (said of the winds), [Ṛg-veda i, 37, 1 and 5; 166, 2]

2) [v.s. ...] m. sport, play, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

3) Krīḍā (क्रीडा):—[from krīḍa > krīḍ] a f. sport, play, pastime, amusement, amorous sport (often in [compound] e.g. krīḍā-mudaḥ f. [plural] the pleasures of playing or of amorous sport, [Gīta-govinda ix, 9]; kṛṣṇa-k, sport with Kṛṣṇa, [Bhāgavata-purāṇa ii, 3, 15]; jala-k, playing about in water, [Mahābhārata; Pañcatantra; Bhāgavata-purāṇa]; toya-k idem, [Meghadūta]), [Vājasaneyi-saṃhitā xviii, 5; Rāmāyaṇa; Suśruta] etc.

4) [v.s. ...] working miracles for one’s amusement, [Lalita-vistara]

5) [v.s. ...] disrespect shown by jest or joke, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

6) [v.s. ...] a play-ground, [Mahābhārata iii, 12318]

7) [v.s. ...] (in music) a kind of measure.

8) [from krīḍ] b (f. of ḍa q.v.)

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Yates Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Krīḍa (क्रीड):—(ṛ) krīḍati 1. a. To play. With anu, ava, ā, pari, or saṃ commonly used in the middle voice.

Source: DDSA: Paia-sadda-mahannavo; a comprehensive Prakrit Hindi dictionary (S)

Krīḍā (क्रीडा) in the Sanskrit language is related to the Prakrit words: Kiḍḍā, Kīlā, Kheḍḍā.

[Sanskrit to German]

Krida in German

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Sanskrit, also spelled संस्कृतम् (saṃskṛtam), is an ancient language of India commonly seen as the grandmother of the Indo-European language family (even English!). Closely allied with Prakrit and Pali, Sanskrit is more exhaustive in both grammar and terms and has the most extensive collection of literature in the world, greatly surpassing its sister-languages Greek and Latin.

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Hindi dictionary

Source: DDSA: A practical Hindi-English dictionary

Krīḍā (क्रीडा):—(nf) play, game, sport, dalliance; fun; —[kautuka] fun and frolic.

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