Kovidara, aka: Kovidāra; 8 Definition(s)

Introduction

Kovidara means something in Buddhism, Pali, Hinduism, Sanskrit, Marathi. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

In Hinduism

Purana and Itihasa (epic history)

Kovidara in Purana glossary... « previous · [K] · next »

Kovidāra (कोविदार) refers to “bauhinia”, forming part of a common diet in ancient Kashmir (Kaśmīra) as mentioned in the Nīlamatapurāṇa.—Kovidāra is also regarded as the abode of poverty (verse 754). G.P. Majumdar refers to its three varieties, namely, Śvetapuṣpa, Pītapuṣpa and Raktapuṣpa, the first one having further two sub-varieties, ‘Nirgandha’ and ‘Surabhikusuma’. Most of the references to the articles of diet occur in the Nīlamata in connection with the offerings made to the gods but it is not difficult to infer from them the food and drink of the common people because “what a man eats his gods eat”.

Source: archive.org: Nilamata Purana: a cultural and literary study
Purana book cover
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The Purana (पुराण, purāṇas) refers to Sanskrit literature preserving ancient India’s vast cultural history, including historical legends, religious ceremonies, various arts and sciences. The eighteen mahapuranas total over 400,000 shlokas (metrical couplets) and date to at least several centuries BCE.

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Ayurveda (science of life)

Kovidara in Ayurveda glossary... « previous · [K] · next »

1) Kovidāra (कोविदार) is a Sanskrit word referring to Phanera purpurea (orchid tree), from the Leguminosae family. Certain plant parts of Kovidāra are eaten as a vegetable (śāka), according to Caraka in his Carakasaṃhitā sūtrasthāna (chapter 27), a classical Āyurvedic work. The plant is therefore part of the Śākavarga group of medicinal plants, referring to the “group of vegetables/pot-herbs”. Caraka defined such groups (vargas) based on the dietic value of the plant. Other botanical synonyms include: Bauhinia castrata and Caspareopsis purpurea. Other commonly used English names include: “purple bauhinia” and “camel’s foot”.

2) Kovidāra is also identified as a synonym for Karbudāra, referring to Bauhinia variegata (orchid tree) in the Cleomaceae family. This synonym was identified by Narahari in his 13th-century Rājanighaṇṭu (verse 13.99), which is an Āyurvedic medicinal thesaurus.

Source: Wisdom Library: Āyurveda and botany
Ayurveda book cover
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Āyurveda (आयुर्वेद, ayurveda) is a branch of Indian science dealing with medicine, herbalism, taxology, anatomy, surgery, alchemy and related topics. Traditional practice of Āyurveda in ancient India dates back to at least the first millenium BC. Literature is commonly written in Sanskrit using various poetic metres.

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General definition (in Hinduism)

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Kovidāra (कोविदार):—Śrīla Viśvanātha Cakravartī gives the following information about Vṛndāvana’s trees: The Kovidāra is a particular kind of kañcanāra (mountain ebony tree). (See the Śrīmad Bhāgavatam 10.30.9).

Source: Wisdom Library: Hinduism

In Buddhism

General definition (in Buddhism)

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Kovidāra (कोविदार).—An enormous flowering tree, or perhaps a grove, in Trāyastriṃśa.

Source: Google Books: Divine Stories: Divyavadana

Languages of India and abroad

Marathi-English dictionary

Kovidara in Marathi glossary... « previous · [K] · next »

kōvidāra (कोविदार).—m S A species of Ebony, Bauhinea variegata. Ex. tuḷasī kō0 sundara || kanakavēli nāga- vēli kōmaḷāṅkura ||.

Source: DDSA: The Molesworth Marathi and English Dictionary
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Marathi is an Indo-European language having over 70 million native speakers people in (predominantly) Maharashtra India. Marathi, like many other Indo-Aryan languages, evolved from early forms of Prakrit, which itself is a subset of Sanskrit, one of the most ancient languages of the world.

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Sanskrit-English dictionary

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Kovidāra (कोविदार).—Name of a tree; चित्तं विदारयति कस्य न कोविदारः (cittaṃ vidārayati kasya na kovidāraḥ) Ṛs.3.6; U.5.1.

Derivable forms: kovidāraḥ (कोविदारः), kovidāram (कोविदारम्).

Source: DDSA: The practical Sanskrit-English dictionary

Kovidāra (कोविदार).—m. (in Sanskrit n. of a tree, and also, in Hariv., of a heavenly tree, equated by BR with pārijāta; same two mgs. belong to Pali koviḷāra), in Mv i.32.4 and ii.452.1, at least, n. of one of the groves of the Trāyastriṃśa gods; elsewhere it is regularly equated or associated with pāri- jāta(ka), which seems as a rule to have its Sanskrit meaning, or pāriyātra(ka), q.v.; compare DPPN ‘The pāricchattaka (= pārijātaka, °yātraka; called a tree, but 100 leagues in circumference) is generally described as a koviḷāra’; it is certainly sometimes a (heavenly) tree, e.g. Gv 193.9 pārijātaka-kovidāra-sadṛśān (vṛkṣān), but at other times it is hard to be sure whether it is conceived as a tree or a grove; e.g. Mvy 4199 (after pāriyātraḥ 4198, which is preceded by names of groves, but with 4200 ff. come words for individual trees); Divy 219.20 pāriyātrako (mss.) nāma kovidāro, 27 pārijātako kovidāro; SP 360.13—14 pārijā- takasya kovidārasya, and same Av ii.89.6 (°jātasya); Gv 501.11 (here pāriyātrakasya). Perhaps the explanation is that, like the Pali pāricchattaka, it was a single tree of such size as to be equivalent to a grove.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Edgerton Buddhist Hybrid Sanskrit Dictionary

Kovidāra (कोविदार).—m.

(-raḥ) A species of ebony, (Bauhinia variegata.) E. ku the earth, dṝ to tear or divide, with vi prefixed deriv. irr.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Shabda-Sagara Sanskrit-English Dictionary
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Sanskrit, also spelled संस्कृतम् (saṃskṛtam), is an ancient language of India commonly seen as the grandmother of the Indo-European language family. Closely allied with Prakrit and Pali, Sanskrit is more exhaustive in both grammar and terms and has the most extensive collection of literature in the world, greatly surpassing its sister-languages Greek and Latin.

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Relevant definitions

Search found 21 related definition(s) that might help you understand this better. Below you will find the 15 most relevant articles:

Pariyatra
Pāriyātra (पारियात्र).—m. (-traḥ) The name of one of the seven principal mountains: see pāripāt...
Campa
Campa (चम्प).—m. (-mpraḥ) Mountain ebony, (Bauhinia variegata.) f. (-mpā) The capital of Karna,...
Vriksha
Vṛkṣa (वृक्ष).—m. (-kṣaḥ) A tree in general. E. vṛkṣ to cover, (to shade,) aff. ghañ; or vraśc ...
Asphota
Āsphoṭa (आस्फोट).—m. (-ṭaḥ) 1. A plant, (Swallow wort.) 2. The sound of striking on the arms, a...
Pariyatraka
Pāriyātraka (पारियात्रक) or Pāriyātra.—m. (= Sanskrit pārijāta, °taka, which also occurs here, ...
Kancanara
Kāñcanāra (काञ्चनार).—The Kovidāra tree.Derivable forms: kāñcanāraḥ (काञ्चनारः).See also (synon...
Parijataka
Pārijātaka (पारिजातक).—m. (-kaḥ) 1. A tree of paradise. 2. The coral tree. E. kan added to the ...
Pandukambala
Pāṇḍukambala (पाण्डुकम्बल) or Pāṇḍukambalaśilā is the name of a throne in the Trāyastriṃśa...
Camarika
Camarika (चमरिक).—The Kovidāra tree.Derivable forms: camarikaḥ (चमरिकः).--- OR --- Cāmarika (चा...
Kadakhya
Kadākhya (कदाख्य).—n. (-khyaṃ) A plant, commonly Kur'h or Kud'h, (Costus speciosus.) E. kat bad...
Shakavarga
Śākavarga (शाकवर्ग) or Śāka is another name for Mūlakādi: the seventh chapter of the 13th-centu...
Pandukambalashila
Pāṇḍukambalaśilā (पाण्डुकम्बलशिला).—(= Pali Paṇḍu °silā), the throne of Indra (perhaps orig., t...
Kancanala
Kāñcanāla (काञ्चनाल).—m. (-laḥ) Mountain ebony, (Bauhinia variegata, &c.) E. kāñcana gold, ...
Yamalapatra
Yamala-patra.—(LP), treaty of alliance. Note: yamala-patra is defined in the “Indian epigraphic...
Svalpakesharin
Svalpakeśarin (स्वल्पकेशरिन्).—m. the Kovidāra tree. Svalpakeśarin is a Sanskrit compound consi...

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