Kotisha, Koṭiśa, Koṭīśa, Koti-isha: 9 definitions

Introduction:

Kotisha means something in Hinduism, Sanskrit. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

The Sanskrit terms Koṭiśa and Koṭīśa can be transliterated into English as Kotisa or Kotisha, using the IAST transliteration scheme (?).

In Hinduism

Purana and Itihasa (epic history)

Source: archive.org: Puranic Encyclopedia

Koṭīśa (कोटीश).—A serpent born in the family of Vāsuki. (Mahābhārata Ādi Parva, Chapter 57, Stanza 5).

Purana book cover
context information

The Purana (पुराण, purāṇas) refers to Sanskrit literature preserving ancient India’s vast cultural history, including historical legends, religious ceremonies, various arts and sciences. The eighteen mahapuranas total over 400,000 shlokas (metrical couplets) and date to at least several centuries BCE.

Discover the meaning of kotisha or kotisa in the context of Purana from relevant books on Exotic India

Shaktism (Shakta philosophy)

Source: Google Books: Manthanabhairavatantram

Koṭīśa (कोटीश) refers to one of the eight Heroes (vīra-aṣṭaka) associated with Tisrapīṭha (located in the ‘end of sound’—nādānta), according to the Manthānabhairavatantra, a vast sprawling work that belongs to a corpus of Tantric texts concerned with the worship of the goddess Kubjikā.—[...] The eight Heroes (vīrāṣṭaka): Ṭaṅkadhārīśa, Koṭīśa, Sundara, Śaśāṅkin, Kṛtavāsa, Vasanta, Saṃtoṣa, Kusumāyudha

Shaktism book cover
context information

Shakta (शाक्त, śākta) or Shaktism (śāktism) represents a tradition of Hinduism where the Goddess (Devi) is revered and worshipped. Shakta literature includes a range of scriptures, including various Agamas and Tantras, although its roots may be traced back to the Vedas.

Discover the meaning of kotisha or kotisa in the context of Shaktism from relevant books on Exotic India

Languages of India and abroad

Sanskrit dictionary

Source: DDSA: The practical Sanskrit-English dictionary

Koṭiśa (कोटिश) or Koṭīśa (कोटीश).—A harrow.

Derivable forms: koṭiśaḥ (कोटिशः), koṭīśaḥ (कोटीशः).

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Shabda-Sagara Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Koṭīśa (कोटीश).—m.

(-śaḥ) A harrow: see koṭiśa.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Monier-Williams Sanskrit-English Dictionary

1) Koṭiśa (कोटिश):—[from koṭa] m. ‘pointed’, a harrow, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

2) [v.s. ...] Name of a Nāga, [Mahābhārata i, 2146.]

3) Koṭīśa (कोटीश):—[from koṭa] mn. (= ṭiśa) a harrow, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Yates Sanskrit-English Dictionary

1) Koṭiśa (कोटिश):—(śaḥ) 1. m. A harrow.

2) Koṭīśa (कोटीश):—[koṭī+śa] (śa-) 1. m. A harrow.

[Sanskrit to German]

Kotisha in German

context information

Sanskrit, also spelled संस्कृतम् (saṃskṛtam), is an ancient language of India commonly seen as the grandmother of the Indo-European language family (even English!). Closely allied with Prakrit and Pali, Sanskrit is more exhaustive in both grammar and terms and has the most extensive collection of literature in the world, greatly surpassing its sister-languages Greek and Latin.

Discover the meaning of kotisha or kotisa in the context of Sanskrit from relevant books on Exotic India

Kannada-English dictionary

Source: Alar: Kannada-English corpus

Kōṭiśa (ಕೋಟಿಶ):—[noun] an agricultural implement used for breaking lumps of earth.

--- OR ---

Kōṭīśa (ಕೋಟೀಶ):—[noun] = ಕೋಟಿಶ [kotisha].

--- OR ---

Kōṭīśa (ಕೋಟೀಶ):—[noun] a man whose wealth comes to at least ten million rupees.

context information

Kannada is a Dravidian language (as opposed to the Indo-European language family) mainly spoken in the southwestern region of India.

Discover the meaning of kotisha or kotisa in the context of Kannada from relevant books on Exotic India

See also (Relevant definitions)

Relevant text

Like what you read? Consider supporting this website: