Koshthanga, aka: Koṣṭhāṅga, Koshtha-anga; 1 Definition(s)

Introduction

Koshthanga means something in Hinduism, Sanskrit. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

The Sanskrit term Koṣṭhāṅga can be transliterated into English as Kosthanga or Koshthanga, using the IAST transliteration scheme (?).

In Hinduism

Ayurveda (science of life)

Koshthanga in Ayurveda glossary... « previous · [K] · next »

Koṣṭhāṅga (कोष्ठाङ्ग) refers to the “internal organs”. It is composed of the words Koṣṭha (translating to ‘store-room’, ‘shell’ or ‘inner appartment’) and Aṅga (translating to ‘limb’ or ‘member’). The term is used throughout Āyurvedic literature such as the Suśruta-saṃhitā and the Caraka-saṃhitā.

Source: Wisdom Library: Āyurveda and botany
Ayurveda book cover
context information

Āyurveda (आयुर्वेद, ayurveda) is a branch of Indian science dealing with medicine, herbalism, taxology, anatomy, surgery, alchemy and related topics. Traditional practice of Āyurveda in ancient India dates back to at least the first millenium BC. Literature is commonly written in Sanskrit using various poetic metres.

Discover the meaning of koshthanga or kosthanga in the context of Ayurveda from relevant books on Exotic India

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