Kokalika, aka: Kokaliya, Kokalikā, Kokālika; 3 Definition(s)

Introduction

Kokalika means something in Buddhism, Pali, Hinduism, Sanskrit. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

In Hinduism

Purana and Itihasa (epic history)

Kokalika in Purana glossary... « previous · [K] · next »

Kokalikā (कोकलिका) refers to the name of a Lady mentioned in the Mahābhārata (cf. IX.45.15). Note: The Mahābhārata (mentioning Kokalikā) is a Sanskrit epic poem consisting of 100,000 ślokas (metrical verses) and is over 2000 years old.

Source: JatLand: List of Mahabharata people and places
Purana book cover
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The Purana (पुराण, purāṇas) refers to Sanskrit literature preserving ancient India’s vast cultural history, including historical legends, religious ceremonies, various arts and sciences. The eighteen mahapuranas total over 400,000 shlokas (metrical couplets) and date to at least several centuries BCE.

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In Buddhism

Theravada (major branch of Buddhism)

Kokalika in Theravada glossary... « previous · [K] · next »

1. Kokalika (Kokaliya) - A monk, one of the chief partisans of Devadatta. Knowing the Buddhas might, he was, at first, reluctant to join in Devadattas plot against him, but later allowed himself to be persuaded on hearing the scheme explained (Vin.ii.196; iii.171). When the monks blamed Devadatta for his misdeeds, Kokalika was always ready to defend him (Vin.iii.174). When Devadattas gains diminished, Kokalika went about praising him, his birth, accomplishments and holiness, and many believed him (J.ii.438f). He was a great friend of Thullananda (Vin.iv.335). We are told that once he expressed resentment because he had never been asked to recite the texts; so one day the monks gave him his chance. He ate his favourite soup, and at sundown, wearing a blue lower robe and an outer robe of white and carrying an elegantly carved fan, he appeared in the assembly. But when he tried to recite sweat poured from his body and he was utterly confused. Henceforth the monks knew that his claim to learning was but pretence (J.ii.65f).

Several Jatakas are related showing how, in previous births also, Kokalika had come to grief because of his fondness for talk and how he had been the accomplice of Devadatta. He is identified with

the jackal in the Daddara Jataka (ii.65ff) and the Sihakotthuka Jataka (ii.108); the ass in the lions skin in the Sihacamma Jataka (ii.110); the talkative tortoise in the Kacchapa Jataka (ii.175); the crow who praised the jackal (Devadatta) in the Jambukhadaka Jataka (ii.438); the young cuckoo who lost his life because he sang, in the Kokalika Jataka (iii.102); the tawny brown brahmin in the Takkariya Jataka (iv.242; but see Kokalika 2); and the wicked deity in the Samuddavagija Jataka (iv.166).

Buddhaghosa says (SNA.ii.473; AA.ii.850; SA.i.167) that this Kokalika was a brahmin and a pupil of Devadatta, and that he was called Maha Kokalika to distinguish him from another Kokalika who was similarly called Cula Kokalika (see Kokalika 2). There seems to be great confusions in the stories of these two men - if they were really two. In the Jataka Commentary, for instance, the introductory stories of several of the Jatakas refer to the Takkariya Jataka for details of Kokalika, obviously having in mind Devadattas partisan; but the introductory story of the Takkariya Jataka is identical with that related elsewhere of Cula Kokalika. See also DhA.iv.91f, where the story of the talkative tortoise is related to Kokalika of the Kokalika Sutta which, according to Buddhaghosa (SNA.ii.473) refers to Cula Kokalika.

In the Vyaggha Jataka (J.ii.356) Kokalika is mentioned as having tried to persuade Sariputta and Moggallana to go with him to his own country and as having been very angry when they refused.

Source: Pali Kanon: Pali Proper Names
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Theravāda is a major branch of Buddhism having the the Pali canon (tipitaka) as their canonical literature, which includes the vinaya-pitaka (monastic rules), the sutta-pitaka (Buddhist sermons) and the abhidhamma-pitaka (philosophy and psychology).

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Mahayana (major branch of Buddhism)

Kokalika in Mahayana glossary... « previous · [K] · next »

Kokālika (कोकालिक) is the name of the disciple of Devadatta who looked for the faults (ādīnava) of Śāriputra and Maudgalyāyana according to the 2nd century Mahāprajñāpāramitāśāstra (chapter XXII).—Summary: 1) Kokālika proclaims the misconduct of the two disciples everywhere. 2) Intervention of the god Brahmā. 3) The obstinacy of Kokālika, his death and fall into hell.

Source: Wisdom Library: Maha Prajnaparamita Sastra
Mahayana book cover
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Mahayana (महायान, mahāyāna) is a major branch of Buddhism focusing on the path of a Bodhisattva (spiritual aspirants/ enlightened beings). Extant literature is vast and primarely composed in the Sanskrit language. There are many sūtras of which some of the earliest are the various Prajñāpāramitā sūtras.

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Relevant definitions

Search found 26 related definition(s) that might help you understand this better. Below you will find the 15 most relevant articles:

Kokalika Sutta
1. Kokalika (Kokaliya) Sutta (See Kokalika 2) - The story of Kokalika - according to Buddhagh...
Culla Kokalika
See Kokalika (2).
Kokalika Jataka
King Brahmadatta was very talkative, and his minister, the Bodhisatta, sought an opportunity ...
Mahapadma
1) Mahāpadma (महापद्म) is the name of a sacred spot mentioned in the Nīlamatapurāṇa.—Mahāpadma ...
Pundarika
Puṇḍarīka (पुण्डरीक) is the name of a hell according to the 2nd century Mahāprajñāpāramitāśāstr...
Kumuda
Kumudā (कुमुदा) is another name for Śāliparṇī, a medicinal plant identified with Desmodium gang...
Baka
Baka (बक) is the name of an Āyuṣmat who was later reborn as Bakabrahmā in Brahmaloka, according...
Daddara Jataka
1) Daddara, 2 (cp. Sk. dardara) a cert. (grinding, crashing) noise A.IV, 171; J.II, 8; III, 4...
Anta Jataka
1) Anta, 3 (nt.) (Vedic āntra, contr. fr. antara inner = Lat. interus, Gr. e)/ntera intestines)...
Paduma
Paduma, (nt.) (cp. Epic Sk. padma, not in RV. ) the lotus Nelumbium speciosum. It is usually me...
Tudu
A Thera. He was the teacher of Culla Kokalika and, having become an Anagami, was born as a Pa...
Takkariya Jataka
Brahmadatta had, as chaplain, a tawny brown brahmin who was toothless, and whose wife had a p...
Vyaggha Jataka
Vyaggha, (cp. Vedic vyāghra) a tiger D. III, 25; A. III, 101; Sn. 416 (°usabha); Ap 68 (°rāj...
Subrahma
Subrahma (सुब्रह्म) is the name of a Buddha under whom Śākyamuni (or Gautama, ‘the historical B...
Kokali
The name of a country, a town and a setthi, all connected with Kokalika. See Kokalika 2. SNA.47...

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