Klesha, aka: Kleśa, Klesa; 7 Definition(s)

Introduction

Klesha means something in Buddhism, Pali, Hinduism, Sanskrit, Marathi. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

The Sanskrit term Kleśa can be transliterated into English as Klesa or Klesha, using the IAST transliteration scheme (?).

In Buddhism

Theravada (major branch of Buddhism)

[Klesha in Theravada glossaries]

Kilesa (“defilements”), are mind-defiling, unwholesome qualities. Vis.M. XXII, 49, 65: There are 10 defilements, thus called because they are themselves defiled, and because they defile the mental factors associated with them.

They are:

  1. greed (lobha),
  2. hate (dosa),
  3. delusion (moha),
  4. conceit (māna),
  5. speculative views (ditthi),
  6. skeptical doubt (vicikicchā),
  7. mental torpor (thīna),
  8. restlessness (uddhacca);
  9. shamelessness (ahirika),
  10. lack of moral dread or unconscientiousness (anottappa)."

For 1-3, s. mūla; 4, s. māna; 5, s. ditthi; 6-8, s. nīvarana; 9 and 10, s. ahirika-anottappa.

The ten are explained in Dhs. 1229f and enumerated in Vibh. XII.

No classification of the k. is found in the Suttas, though the term occurs quite often in them. For the related term, upakkilesa ('impurities') different lists are given - (App.).

(Source): Pali Kanon: Manual of Buddhist Terms and Doctrines
context information

Theravāda is a major branch of Buddhism having the the Pali canon (tipitaka) as their canonical literature, which includes the vinaya-pitaka (monastic rules), the sutta-pitaka (Buddhist sermons) and the abhidhamma-pitaka (philosophy and psychology).

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Mahayana (major branch of Buddhism)

[Klesha in Mahayana glossaries]

Kleśa (क्लेश, “afflictions”).—The Bodhisattvas (accompanying the Buddha at Rājagṛha on the Gṛdhrakūṭaparvata) excelled in destroying various the afflictions (kleśa) according to Mahāprajñāpāramitāśāstra chapter 13. The afflictions (kleśa) are called kleśa (in Chinese, fan nao) because they vex (fan) and torment (nao) the mind.

There are two types of kleśa:

  1. inner attachment (ādhyātmikasaṅga),
  2. outer attachment (bāhyasaṅga).

The kleśas of inner attachment are the five dṛṣṭis, doubt (vicikitsā), pride (māna), etc.; the kleśas of outer attachment are lust (rāga), hatred (dveṣa), etc. Ignorance (avidyā) is both inner and outer.

(Source): Wisdom Library: Maha Prajnaparamita Sastra
Mahayana book cover
context information

Mahayana (महायान, mahāyāna) is a major branch of Buddhism focusing on the path of a Bodhisattva (spiritual aspirants/ enlightened beings). Extant literature is vast and primarely composed in the Sanskrit language. There are many sūtras of which some of the earliest are the various Prajñāpāramitā sūtras.

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General definition (in Buddhism)

[Klesha in Buddhism glossaries]

1) Kleśa (क्लेश) refers to the “six defilements” as defined in the Dharma-saṃgraha (section 67):

  1. rāga (passion),
  2. pratigha (repulsion),
  3. māna (conceit),
  4. avidyā (ignorance),
  5. kudṛṣṭi (bad view),
  6. vicikitsā (doubt).

The Dharma-samgraha (Dharmasangraha) is an extensive glossary of Buddhist technical terms in Sanskrit (eg., kleśa). The work is attributed to Nagarjuna who lived around the 2nd century A.D.

2) Kleśa or Kleśamāra refers to the “defilements destroyer” and represents one of the “four destroyers” (māra) as defined in the Dharma-saṃgraha (section 80).

3) Kleśa or Kleśāvaraṇa refers to the “obstruction of defilements” and represents one of the “two obstructions” (āvaraṇa) as defined in the Dharma-saṃgraha (section 115).

(Source): Wisdom Library: Dharma-samgraha

kleśa [kilesa] defilement, impurity or delusion. According to Buddhist psychology, mind is fundamentally pure but it is defiled by unwholesome qualities known as defilements that come from without. The defilements stand in the way of spiritual practice and obstruct wisdom. When they are latent and inactive in mind, they are known as residue (anuśaya) [anusaya]; when they become distinct, they are known as paryavasthāna [pariyuṭṭhāna].

According to the Abhidhamma the ten defilements are as follows.

  1. greed (lobha),
  2. hatred (doṣa) [dosa],
  3. delusion (moha),
  4. conceit (māna),
  5. false views (kudṛṣṭi) [diṭṭhi],
  6. doubt (vicikitsā) [vicikicchā],
  7. mental torpor (styāna) [thīna],
  8. restlessness (auddhatya) [uddhacca],
  9. shamelessness (to do evil) (āhrīkya) [ahirika],
  10. lack of fear (to do evil) (anotrapya) [anottappa].
(Source): DLMBS: Buddhānusmṛti

Languages of India and abroad

Marathi-English dictionary

[Klesha in Marathi glossaries]

klēśa (क्लेश).—m (S) Affliction or distress: also pains, labor, trouble. Gen. in pl.

(Source): DDSA: The Molesworth Marathi and English Dictionary

klēśa (क्लेश).—m Affiction or distress, also pains.

(Source): DDSA: The Aryabhusan school dictionary, Marathi-English
context information

Marathi is an Indo-European language having over 70 million native speakers people in (predominantly) Maharashtra India. Marathi, like many other Indo-Aryan languages, evolved from early forms of Prakrit, which itself is a subset of Sanskrit, one of the most ancient languages of the world.

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Sanskrit-English dictionary

[Klesha in Sanskrit glossaries]

Kleśa (क्लेश).—[kliś-bhāve ghañ]

1) Pain, anguish, suffering, distress, trouble; किमात्मा क्लेशस्य पदमुपनीतः (kimātmā kleśasya padamupanītaḥ) Ś.1; क्लेशः फलेन हि पुनर्नवतां विधत्ते (kleśaḥ phalena hi punarnavatāṃ vidhatte) Ku.5.86; Bg.12.5.

2) Wrath, anger.

3) Care, trouble.

4) Worldly occupation.

5) Sin (in the Buddhist sense); अविद्याऽस्मितारागद्वेषाभिनि (avidyā'smitārāgadveṣābhini)शाः क्लेशाः (śāḥ kleśāḥ) Yoga Sūtra 2.3. अपि च क्लेशान् विहाय मम शत्रुबुद्धिरे (api ca kleśān vihāya mama śatrubuddhire) नान्यत्र (nānyatra) Nāg.3; अनुकम्प्यतामसौ राज्यस्य कृते क्लेशदासीकृतो तपस्वी (anukampyatāmasau rājyasya kṛte kleśadāsīkṛto tapasvī) ibid.

Derivable forms: kleśaḥ (क्लेशः).

(Source): DDSA: The practical Sanskrit-English dictionary
context information

Sanskrit, also spelled संस्कृतम् (saṃskṛtam), is an ancient language of India commonly seen as the grandmother of the Indo-European language family. Closely allied with Prakrit and Pali, Sanskrit is more exhaustive in both grammar and terms and has the most extensive collection of literature in the world, greatly surpassing its sister-languages Greek and Latin.

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Relevant definitions

Search found 54 related definition(s) that might help you understand this better. Below you will find the 15 most relevant articles:

Kayaklesha
Kāyakleśa (कायक्लेश).—bodily suffering or pain; कायक्ले- शभयात्त्येजत् (kāyakle- śabhayāttyejat...
Kleshavarana
Kleśāvaraṇa (क्लेशावरण) or simply Kleśa refers to the “obstruction of defilements” and represen...
Kleshamara
Kleśamāra (क्लेशमार) or simply Kleśa refers to “the defilements destroyer” and represents one o...
Kleshakara
Kleśakara (क्लेशकर).—a. causing pain or trouble. Kleśakara is a Sanskrit compound consisting of...
Kleshatyaga
Kleśatyāga (क्लेशत्याग) refers to the “abandoning of the afflicting emotions”, according to the...
Garbhaklesha
Garbhakleśa (गर्भक्लेश).—pains caused by the embryo, the throes of parturition or childbirth. D...
Kleshakshama
Kleśakṣamā (क्लेशक्षमा).—a. capable of enduring trouble.Kleśakṣamā is a Sanskrit compound consi...
Tapahklesha
Tapaḥkleśa (तपःक्लेश).—the pain of religious austerity. Derivable forms: tapaḥkleśaḥ (तपःक्लेशः...
Kleshakashaya
Kleśakaṣāya (क्लेशकषाय) refers to the “stain of defilements” and represents one of the “five st...
Kleshapaha
Kleśāpaha (क्लेशापह).—a. allaying pain, consoling, palliative. -haḥ a son. Kleśāpaha is a Sansk...
Kleshavasana
Kleśavāsanā (क्लेशवासना):—Anantavarman, a commentator on the Mahāvibhāṣā, defined the ...
Avidya
Avidya (अविद्य).—a.1) Not educated, unlearned, foolish, unwise, अविद्यानां तु सर्वेषामीहात श्चे...
Kashaya
Kaśāya (कशाय) participated in the war between Rāma and Rāvaṇa, on the side of the latter, as me...
Bala
Bala (बल) participated in the war between Rāma and Rāvaṇa, on the side of the latter, as mentio...
Raga
Rāgā (रागा).—One of the seven daughters of Bṛhaspati—Aṅgiras. As she was loved by all beings sh...

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