Kitava: 19 definitions

Introduction:

Kitava means something in Buddhism, Pali, Hinduism, Sanskrit, Marathi, Jainism, Prakrit. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

In Hinduism

Purana and Itihasa (epic history)

Source: archive.org: Puranic Encyclopedia

Kitava (कितव).—An ancient tribe of people. They once visited Yudhiṣṭhira with many presents. (Sabhā Parva, Chapter 51, Verse 12).

Source: JatLand: List of Mahabharata people and places

Kitava (कितव) is a name mentioned in the Mahābhārata (cf. II.47.10, VI.18.13) and represents one of the many proper names used for people and places. Note: The Mahābhārata (mentioning Kitava) is a Sanskrit epic poem consisting of 100,000 ślokas (metrical verses) and is over 2000 years old.

Purana book cover
context information

The Purana (पुराण, purāṇas) refers to Sanskrit literature preserving ancient India’s vast cultural history, including historical legends, religious ceremonies, various arts and sciences. The eighteen mahapuranas total over 400,000 shlokas (metrical couplets) and date to at least several centuries BCE.

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Ayurveda (science of life)

Dietetics and Culinary Art (such as household cooking)

Source: Shodhganga: Dietetics and culinary art in ancient and medieval India

Kitava (कितव) refers to the “thorn apple” and is mentioned in a list of remedies for indigestion in the 17th century Bhojanakutūhala (dravyaguṇāguṇa-kathana), and is commonly found in literature dealing with the topics of dietetics and culinary art, also known as Pākaśāstra or Pākakalā.—A complete section in Bhojanakutūhala is devoted for the description of agents that cause indigestion [viz., godhūma (wheat) or māṣa (black-gram) or harimantha (bengal-gram) or mudga (green-gram) or yava (barley) or satīna (garden pea)]. These agents consumed on a large scale can cause indigestion for certain people. The remedies [viz., kitava (thorn apple)] for these types of indigestions are also explained therewith.

Ayurveda book cover
context information

Āyurveda (आयुर्वेद, ayurveda) is a branch of Indian science dealing with medicine, herbalism, taxology, anatomy, surgery, alchemy and related topics. Traditional practice of Āyurveda in ancient India dates back to at least the first millenium BC. Literature is commonly written in Sanskrit using various poetic metres.

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Jyotisha (astronomy and astrology)

Source: Wisdom Library: Brihat Samhita by Varahamihira

Kitava (कितव) refers to “deceitful men”, according to the Bṛhatsaṃhitā (chapter 10), an encyclopedic Sanskrit work written by Varāhamihira mainly focusing on the science of ancient Indian astronomy astronomy (Jyotiṣa).—Accordingly, “If the course of Saturn should lie through the constellation of Mṛgaśīrṣa, the people of Vatsa, the officiating priests in sacrificial rites as well as the persons that perform them, revered men and the people of Madhyadeśa will suffer miseries; if through Ārdrā, the people of Pārata, of Ramaṭha, oil-mongers, washermen and thieves will suffer. If the course of Saturn should lie through the constellation of Punarvasu, the Pāñcālas, the border Mlecchas and the people of Saurāṣṭra, of Sindh and of Sauvīraka will suffer miseries; if his course should lie through the constellation of Puṣya, bell ringers, criers, the Yavanas tradesmen, deceitful men [i.e., kitava] and flowers will suffer”.

Jyotisha book cover
context information

Jyotisha (ज्योतिष, jyotiṣa or jyotish) refers to ‘astronomy’ or “Vedic astrology” and represents the fifth of the six Vedangas (additional sciences to be studied along with the Vedas). Jyotisha concerns itself with the study and prediction of the movements of celestial bodies, in order to calculate the auspicious time for rituals and ceremonies.

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In Buddhism

Theravada (major branch of Buddhism)

Source: Pali Kanon: Pali Proper Names

King of Benares. His son became known in this Buddha age as Kundinagariya Thera (PvA.177f; 263f). From the Petavatthu (iv.7) Kitava would appear to be the king, not of Benares but of Rajagaha (Giribbaja).

context information

Theravāda is a major branch of Buddhism having the the Pali canon (tipitaka) as their canonical literature, which includes the vinaya-pitaka (monastic rules), the sutta-pitaka (Buddhist sermons) and the abhidhamma-pitaka (philosophy and psychology).

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Languages of India and abroad

Pali-English dictionary

Source: BuddhaSasana: Concise Pali-English Dictionary

kitava : (m.) a cheat.

Source: Sutta: The Pali Text Society's Pali-English Dictionary

Kitava, & kitavā (=kaṭavā? cp. kaṭa) one who plays false; a cheat; adj. deceitful S. I, 24; J. V, 116; 117 (a°);—kitavā at Dh. 252 (=DhA. III, 375) in combination with saṭha also at J. VI, 228, where the connection with kaṭa is evident: kaṭaṃ Aḷāto gaṇhāti kiṭavā sikkhito yathā= like one who is skilled in having the kaṭa, the lucky die. explained at DhA. III, 375 as taken from fowling: kitavāya attabhāvaṃ paṭicchādeti “he hides himself by means of a pretence” (behind sham branches). (Page 214)

Pali book cover
context information

Pali is the language of the Tipiṭaka, which is the sacred canon of Theravāda Buddhism and contains much of the Buddha’s speech. Closeley related to Sanskrit, both languages are used interchangeably between religions.

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Marathi-English dictionary

Source: DDSA: The Molesworth Marathi and English Dictionary

kitava (कितव).—m S A gamester. 2 In dramas &c. A nāyaka faithless to his nāyakā.

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kitava (कितव).—a S Roguish, knavish, scampish.

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kitavā (कितवा).—a See kitakāvā.

context information

Marathi is an Indo-European language having over 70 million native speakers people in (predominantly) Maharashtra India. Marathi, like many other Indo-Aryan languages, evolved from early forms of Prakrit, which itself is a subset of Sanskrit, one of the most ancient languages of the world.

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Sanskrit dictionary

Source: DDSA: The practical Sanskrit-English dictionary

Kitava (कितव).—(- f.)

1) A rogue, liar, cheat; अर्हति किल कितव उपद्रवम् (arhati kila kitava upadravam) M.4; Amaruśataka 2,46; Meghadūta 113.

2) The Dhattūra plant.

3) A kind of perfume (commonly rocana).

4) A gamester, gambler; Manusmṛti 3.159.

5) A mad or crazy person.

Derivable forms: kitavaḥ (कितवः).

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Shabda-Sagara Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Kitava (कितव).—mfn.

(-vaḥ-vā-vaṃ) 1. A gamester, a gambler. 2. A cheat, cheating, fraudulent. 3. Mad, crazy. 4. Mischievous, malicious. m.

(-vaḥ) 1. Thorn apple, (Datura metel.) 2. A kind of perfume, commonly Rochana. E. kiṃ what, tava your, (what is your stake or wager?) he who asks such a question, &c.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Benfey Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Kitava (कितव).— (akin to kit), m. 1. A gamester, [Mānavadharmaśāstra] 3, 151. 2. A cheat, [Bhāgavata-Purāṇa, (ed. Burnouf.)] 8, 20, 3; a rogue, [Meghadūta, (ed. Gildemeister.)] 110. 3. pl. The name of a people, Mahābhārata 2, 1832.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Cappeller Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Kitava (कितव).—[masculine] gambler ([feminine] ); cheat, deceiver.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Monier-Williams Sanskrit-English Dictionary

1) Kitava (कितव):—m. ([gana] śauṇḍādi [also vyāghrādi, but not in [Kāśikā-vṛtti] and, [Gaṇaratna-mahodadhi]]) a gamester, gambler, [Ṛg-veda; Vājasaneyi-saṃhitā; Atharva-veda] etc.

2) a cheat, fraudulent man, [Bhāgavata-purāṇa viii, 20, 3; Meghadūta; Amaru-śataka]

3) (also ifc. e.g. yājñika-k, [Pāṇini 2-1, 53; Kāśikā-vṛtti])

4) (= matta) a crazy person, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

5) thorn-apple (cf. dhūrta and unmatta), [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

6) a kind of perfume (commonly Rocana), [Bhāvaprakāśa]

7) Name of a man [gana] tikādi, utkarādi, aśvādi

8) m. Name of a people, [Mahābhārata ii, 1832]

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Yates Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Kitava (कितव):—(vaḥ) 1. m. A gamester; a cheat. m. Thorn-apple; a perfume.

Source: DDSA: Paia-sadda-mahannavo; a comprehensive Prakrit Hindi dictionary (S)

Kitava (कितव) in the Sanskrit language is related to the Prakrit word: Kitava.

[Sanskrit to German]

Kitava in German

context information

Sanskrit, also spelled संस्कृतम् (saṃskṛtam), is an ancient language of India commonly seen as the grandmother of the Indo-European language family (even English!). Closely allied with Prakrit and Pali, Sanskrit is more exhaustive in both grammar and terms and has the most extensive collection of literature in the world, greatly surpassing its sister-languages Greek and Latin.

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Prakrit-English dictionary

Source: DDSA: Paia-sadda-mahannavo; a comprehensive Prakrit Hindi dictionary

Kitava (कितव) in the Prakrit language is related to the Sanskrit word: Kitava.

context information

Prakrit is an ancient language closely associated with both Pali and Sanskrit. Jain literature is often composed in this language or sub-dialects, such as the Agamas and their commentaries which are written in Ardhamagadhi and Maharashtri Prakrit. The earliest extant texts can be dated to as early as the 4th century BCE although core portions might be older.

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Kannada-English dictionary

Source: Alar: Kannada-English corpus

Kitava (ಕಿತವ):—

1) [noun] a man who plays games of chance for money or some other stake; a gambler.

2) [noun] a man who habitually cheats; a cheat; a swindler; a deceiver.

3) [noun] the small shrubby plant, Datura stramonium of Solanaceae family with bright yellow flowers; datura.

4) [noun] a mad or crazy man.

context information

Kannada is a Dravidian language (as opposed to the Indo-European language family) mainly spoken in the southwestern region of India.

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