Kirtita, Kīrtita: 5 definitions

Introduction:

Kirtita means something in Hinduism, Sanskrit, Jainism, Prakrit, the history of ancient India. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

In Hinduism

Vastushastra (architecture)

Source: Brill: Śaivism and the Tantric Traditions (architecture)

Kīrtita (कीर्तित) (Cf. Kīrtana) refers to “announcing (a creature’s name)”, according to the Devyāmata (in the section śalyoddhāra-paṭala or “excavation of extraneous substances”).—Accordingly, “[...] [The officiant] should carefully prognosticate the extraneous thing [underground] by observing [a creature] step over a cord, seeing [an auspicious or inauspicious thing], announcing a [creature’s] name (nāman-kīrtana), or hearing [an auspicious or inauspicious sound]. If [a creature] steps over [a cord] or is seen, or if one [hears] a cry of [a creature] or announce a [creature’s] name (nāman-kīrtita), then [the officiant] should prognosticate the extraneous thing [related to] that creature according to the stepping over and other [omens]. [...]”.

Vastushastra book cover
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Vastushastra (वास्तुशास्त्र, vāstuśāstra) refers to the ancient Indian science (shastra) of architecture (vastu), dealing with topics such architecture, sculpture, town-building, fort building and various other constructions. Vastu also deals with the philosophy of the architectural relation with the cosmic universe.

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In Jainism

General definition (in Jainism)

Source: The University of Sydney: A study of the Twelve Reflections

Kīrtita (कीर्तित) refers to “that which is said”, according to the 11th century Jñānārṇava, a treatise on Jain Yoga in roughly 2200 Sanskrit verses composed by Śubhacandra.—Accordingly, “Good conduct is said (kīrtita) by one who is honourable [to be like a tree] whose roots are the five great vows, whose foliage is the [mendicant] rule of life which is faultless in a high degree, bent with the weight of the fruit of restraint [of body, mind and speech]”.

General definition book cover
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Jainism is an Indian religion of Dharma whose doctrine revolves around harmlessness (ahimsa) towards every living being. The two major branches (Digambara and Svetambara) of Jainism stimulate self-control (or, shramana, ‘self-reliance’) and spiritual development through a path of peace for the soul to progess to the ultimate goal.

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India history and geography

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Indian Epigraphical Glossary

Kīrtita.—(EI 24), ‘built’; cf. prakīrtita. Note: kīrtita is defined in the “Indian epigraphical glossary” as it can be found on ancient inscriptions commonly written in Sanskrit, Prakrit or Dravidian languages.

India history book cover
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The history of India traces the identification of countries, villages, towns and other regions of India, as well as royal dynasties, rulers, tribes, local festivities and traditions and regional languages. Ancient India enjoyed religious freedom and encourages the path of Dharma, a concept common to Buddhism, Hinduism, and Jainism.

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Languages of India and abroad

Sanskrit dictionary

Source: DDSA: The practical Sanskrit-English dictionary

Kīrtita (कीर्तित).—p. p.

1) Said, asserted.

2) Mentioned, told.

3) Known; notorious.

4) Praised, celebrated.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Monier-Williams Sanskrit-English Dictionary

1) Kīrtita (कीर्तित):—[from kīrt] mfn. said, mentioned, asserted

2) [v.s. ...] celebrated known, notorious.

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Sanskrit, also spelled संस्कृतम् (saṃskṛtam), is an ancient language of India commonly seen as the grandmother of the Indo-European language family (even English!). Closely allied with Prakrit and Pali, Sanskrit is more exhaustive in both grammar and terms and has the most extensive collection of literature in the world, greatly surpassing its sister-languages Greek and Latin.

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