Kimkara, Kiṃkara, Kiṅkara, Kiṅkarā, Kinkara, Kinkara, Kim-kara: 24 definitions

Introduction:

Kimkara means something in Buddhism, Pali, Hinduism, Sanskrit, Jainism, Prakrit, Marathi. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

In Hinduism

Purana and Itihasa (epic history)

Source: archive.org: Puranic Encyclopedia

1) Kiṅkara (किङ्कर).—A Rākṣasa. Śakti, the son of Vasiṣṭha and King Kalmāṣapāda of the solar dynasty once quarrelled with each other, and the King cursed and turned Śakti into a Rākṣasa. At this juncture Viśvāmitra invoked Kiṅkara, a Rākṣasa attendant of his, into the body of Kalmāṣapāda, and induced by Kiṅkara, Kalmāṣapāda killed all the sons of Vasiṣṭha. (Ādi Parva, Chapter 175).

2) Kiṅkara (किङ्कर).—Name of Kāla’s stick. It is with this stick that Kāla kills living beings. "Like Kāla who holds the stick Kiṅkara." (Karṇa Parva, Chapter 56, Verse 122).

3) Kiṅkara (किङ्कर).—A race of Rākṣasas. After building the palace at Indraprastha for the Pāṇḍavas Mayāsura put 8000 Kiṅkaras for guarding the palace (Sabhā Parva, Chapter 3). These guards were able to remove the palace from one place to another. Yudhiṣṭhira, who started for the north to collect money is said to have met the Kiṅkaras on the Himālayas. (Aśvamedhika Parva, Chapter 65, Verse 6).

Purana book cover
context information

The Purana (पुराण, purāṇas) refers to Sanskrit literature preserving ancient India’s vast cultural history, including historical legends, religious ceremonies, various arts and sciences. The eighteen mahapuranas total over 400,000 shlokas (metrical couplets) and date to at least several centuries BCE.

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Shaktism (Shakta philosophy)

Source: Wisdom Library: Śāktism

Kiṃkara (किंकर, “servant”) refers to one of the sixty defects of mantras, according to the 11th century Kulārṇava-tantra: an important scripture of the Kaula school of Śāktism traditionally stated to have consisted of 125.000 Sanskrit verses.—Accordingly, as Īśvara says to Śrī Devī: “For those who do japa without knowing these defects [e.g., kiṃkara—servant], there is no realization even with millions and billions of japa. [...] Oh My Beloved! there are ten processes for eradicating defects in Mantras as described. [...]”.

Source: Google Books: Manthanabhairavatantram

Kiṃkara (किंकर) refers to “servants”, according to the Śrīmatottara-tantra, an expansion of the Kubjikāmatatantra: the earliest popular and most authoritative Tantra of the Kubjikā cult.—Accordingly, while describing Trikhaṇḍā: “[...] The goddess is enveloped in divine clothes and is adorned with many kinds of flowers. She is the Great Light and, shining intensely, she is in the middle of the Wheel of Mothers each of whom has four arms, three eyes and a topknot. Each holds a sword, club, skull and makes a boon bestowing gesture. They have many ornaments. Their form is divine and beautiful. They shine and, possessing many forms, they are beautiful. Each is seated on her own vehicle in the lotus posture. The enemy lies at their feet and, controlled by a spell, is consumed along with (offerings of) meat and the like by (their) servants [i.e., Kiṃkara], Vetālas, Ḍākinīs, and ghosts. Very fierce, they strike (the enemy and) drink streams of (his) blood. [...]”.

Source: Shodhganga: Iconographical representations of Śiva (shaktism)

Kiṅkara (किङ्कर) or Kiṅkaratantra refers to one of the twenty-three Vāmatantras, belonging to the Śāktāgama (or Śāktatantra) division of the Āgama tradition. The Śāktāgamas represent the wisdom imparted by Devī to Īśvara and convey the idea that the worship of Śakti is the means to attain liberation. According to the Pratiṣṭhālakṣaṇasamuccaya of Vairocana, the Śāktatantras are divided into to four parts, the Kiṅkara-tantra belonging to the Vāma class.

Shaktism book cover
context information

Shakta (शाक्त, śākta) or Shaktism (śāktism) represents a tradition of Hinduism where the Goddess (Devi) is revered and worshipped. Shakta literature includes a range of scriptures, including various Agamas and Tantras, although its roots may be traced back to the Vedas.

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Ayurveda (science of life)

Source: Wisdom Library: Local Names of Plants and Drugs

Kinkara [किंकर] in the Marathi language is the name of a plant identified with Vachellia farnesiana (L.) Wight & Arn. from the Mimosaceae (Touch-me-not) family having the following synonyms: Acacia acicularis, Acacia farnesiana, Mimosa farnesiana. For the possible medicinal usage of kinkara, you can check this page for potential sources and references, although be aware that any some or none of the side-effects may not be mentioned here, wether they be harmful or beneficial to health.

Ayurveda book cover
context information

Āyurveda (आयुर्वेद, ayurveda) is a branch of Indian science dealing with medicine, herbalism, taxology, anatomy, surgery, alchemy and related topics. Traditional practice of Āyurveda in ancient India dates back to at least the first millenium BC. Literature is commonly written in Sanskrit using various poetic metres.

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Yoga (school of philosophy)

[«previous next»] — Kimkara in Yoga glossary
Source: Brill: Śaivism and the Tantric Traditions (yoga)

Kiṃkara (किंकर) refers to a “worshipper”, according to the Rājatarala, an 18th-century text dealing with Yoga.—The Rājatarala is a lengthy commentary on the Yogatārāvalī (circa 14th c.) that was composed by Rāmasvāmipaṇḍita, who is described as a worshipper of Śaṅkarācārya’s feet (śrī-śaṃkarācārya-pāda-kiṃkara).

Yoga book cover
context information

Yoga is originally considered a branch of Hindu philosophy (astika), but both ancient and modern Yoga combine the physical, mental and spiritual. Yoga teaches various physical techniques also known as āsanas (postures), used for various purposes (eg., meditation, contemplation, relaxation).

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Shaivism (Shaiva philosophy)

Source: SOAS University of London: Protective Rites in the Netra Tantra

Kiṅkara (किङ्कर) refers to the “servants”, according to the Netratantra of Kṣemarāja: a Śaiva text from the 9th century in which Śiva (Bhairava) teaches Pārvatī topics such as metaphysics, cosmology, and soteriology.—Accordingly, [verse 10.39-45]—“Now I shall explain the protection of the king [with the mantra]. [The Mantrin] should write the name [of the king] enveloped in the middle of the mantra. Above this, he should worship Bhairava, Deva and Amṛteśa, O Beautiful. The Devīs and Dūtis are joined with him at the end [of the mantra] on the petals. Thus, the servants (kiṅkara) [become] bound to the root Mantra. [...]”.

Shaivism book cover
context information

Shaiva (शैव, śaiva) or Shaivism (śaivism) represents a tradition of Hinduism worshiping Shiva as the supreme being. Closely related to Shaktism, Shaiva literature includes a range of scriptures, including Tantras, while the root of this tradition may be traced back to the ancient Vedas.

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In Buddhism

Tibetan Buddhism (Vajrayana or tantric Buddhism)

Source: Wisdom Library: Tibetan Buddhism

1) Kiṃkara (किंकर) is the name of a Tathāgata (Buddha) mentioned as attending the teachings in the 6th century Mañjuśrīmūlakalpa: one of the largest Kriyā Tantras devoted to Mañjuśrī (the Bodhisattva of wisdom) representing an encyclopedia of knowledge primarily concerned with ritualistic elements in Buddhism. The teachings in this text originate from Mañjuśrī and were taught to and by Buddha Śākyamuni in the presence of a large audience (including Kiṃkara).

2) Kiṅkarā (किङ्करा) refers to a group of deities summoned by the Yamāntaka-mantra and mentioned as attending the Mañjuśrīmūlakalpa. The teachings in this text originate from Mañjuśrī and were taught to and by Buddha Śākyamuni in the presence of a large audience (including Kiṅkarā).

Tibetan Buddhism book cover
context information

Tibetan Buddhism includes schools such as Nyingma, Kadampa, Kagyu and Gelug. Their primary canon of literature is divided in two broad categories: The Kangyur, which consists of Buddha’s words, and the Tengyur, which includes commentaries from various sources. Esotericism and tantra techniques (vajrayāna) are collected indepently.

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In Jainism

General definition (in Jainism)

Source: The University of Sydney: A study of the Twelve Reflections

Kiṃkara (किंकर) refers to the “servants” (of Yama), according to the 11th century Jñānārṇava, a treatise on Jain Yoga in roughly 2200 Sanskrit verses composed by Śubhacandra.—Accordingly, “Rudra, elephants of the quarters, gods, demons, aerial spirits, aquatic predators, the planets, the Vyantaras , the guardians of the quarters of the sky, the enemies [of Vāsudeva], Hari, Bala, the chief of the snakes, the lord of the discus (i.e. Viṣṇu) and others who are powerful, the wind, the sun, etc. all themselves having come together are not able to protect an embodied soul even for an instant [when death is] initiated by the servants of Yama (yama-kiṃkara)”.

General definition book cover
context information

Jainism is an Indian religion of Dharma whose doctrine revolves around harmlessness (ahimsa) towards every living being. The two major branches (Digambara and Svetambara) of Jainism stimulate self-control (or, shramana, ‘self-reliance’) and spiritual development through a path of peace for the soul to progess to the ultimate goal.

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Languages of India and abroad

Pali-English dictionary

[«previous next»] — Kimkara in Pali glossary
Source: BuddhaSasana: Concise Pali-English Dictionary

kiṅkara or kiṃkara: (m.) a servant; an attendant.

Pali book cover
context information

Pali is the language of the Tipiṭaka, which is the sacred canon of Theravāda Buddhism and contains much of the Buddha’s speech. Closeley related to Sanskrit, both languages are used interchangeably between religions.

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Marathi-English dictionary

Source: DDSA: The Molesworth Marathi and English Dictionary

Kiṅkara (किङ्कर).—f A tree; called also dēvabābhaḷa, a variety of Acacia.

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kiṅkara (किंकर).—m (S) A servant.

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kiṅkara (किंकर).—f. Add:--The tree is named Acacia farnesiana.

Source: DDSA: The Aryabhusan school dictionary, Marathi-English

Kiṅkara (किङ्कर).—f A tree; called also dēvabābhaḷa. m A servant.

context information

Marathi is an Indo-European language having over 70 million native speakers people in (predominantly) Maharashtra India. Marathi, like many other Indo-Aryan languages, evolved from early forms of Prakrit, which itself is a subset of Sanskrit, one of the most ancient languages of the world.

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Sanskrit dictionary

Source: DDSA: The practical Sanskrit-English dictionary

Kiṃkara (किंकर).—a servant, slave; अवेहि मां किंकरमष्टमूर्तेः (avehi māṃ kiṃkaramaṣṭamūrteḥ) R.2.35.

- a female servant.

- the wife of a servant.

Derivable forms: kiṃkaraḥ (किंकरः).

Kiṃkara is a Sanskrit compound consisting of the terms kim and kara (कर).

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Edgerton Buddhist Hybrid Sanskrit Dictionary

Kiṃkara (किंकर).—[, (probably corruption) for kaṃkara, q.v.: Gaṇḍavyūha 133.1.]

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Kiṃkara (किंकर).—name of a yakṣa: Mahā-Māyūrī 90.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Shabda-Sagara Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Kiṅkara (किङ्कर).—mfn.

(-raḥ-rā or -rī-raṃ) A servant. E. kiṃ what or something, and kara who does.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Benfey Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Kiṃkara (किंकर).—i. e. kim-kṛ + a, I. m. and f. , A servant, [Rāmāyaṇa] 1, 18, 13; Mahābhārata 4, 634. Ii. m. 1. A tribe of demons, [Rāmāyaṇa] 1, 3, 30. 2. The name of a people, [Rāmāyaṇa] 4, 44, 13.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Cappeller Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Kiṃkara (किंकर).—[masculine] ī [feminine] servant or slave.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Monier-Williams Sanskrit-English Dictionary

1) Kiṃkara (किंकर):—[=kiṃ-kara] a etc. See kim.

2) [=kiṃ-kara] [from kiṃ > kim] b m. ([Pāṇini 3-2, 21]) a servant, slave, [Mahābhārata; Rāmāyaṇa] etc.

3) [v.s. ...] (probably) a particular part of a carriage, [Atharva-veda viii, 8, 22]

4) [v.s. ...] a kind of Rākṣasa, [Mahābhārata; Rāmāyaṇa]

5) [v.s. ...] Name of one of Śiva’s attendants, [Kathāsaritsāgara cxviii, 5]

6) [v.s. ...] m. [plural] Name of a people, [Rāmāyaṇa iv, 44, 13]

7) Kiṃkarā (किंकरा):—[=kiṃ-karā] [from kiṃ-kara > kiṃ > kim] f. a female servant, [Pāṇini 3-2, 21], [vArttika]

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Yates Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Kiṅkara (किङ्कर):—[kiṅka-ra] (raḥ-rā-rī) 1. m. f. 3. f. A servant.

Source: DDSA: Paia-sadda-mahannavo; a comprehensive Prakrit Hindi dictionary (S)

Kiṅkara (किङ्कर) in the Sanskrit language is related to the Prakrit word: Kiṃkara.

[Sanskrit to German]

Kimkara in German

context information

Sanskrit, also spelled संस्कृतम् (saṃskṛtam), is an ancient language of India commonly seen as the grandmother of the Indo-European language family (even English!). Closely allied with Prakrit and Pali, Sanskrit is more exhaustive in both grammar and terms and has the most extensive collection of literature in the world, greatly surpassing its sister-languages Greek and Latin.

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Prakrit-English dictionary

Source: DDSA: Paia-sadda-mahannavo; a comprehensive Prakrit Hindi dictionary

1) Kiṃkara (किंकर) in the Prakrit language is related to the Sanskrit word: Kiṅkara.

2) Kiṃkāra (किंकार) also relates to the Sanskrit word: Kreṅkāra.

context information

Prakrit is an ancient language closely associated with both Pali and Sanskrit. Jain literature is often composed in this language or sub-dialects, such as the Agamas and their commentaries which are written in Ardhamagadhi and Maharashtri Prakrit. The earliest extant texts can be dated to as early as the 4th century BCE although core portions might be older.

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Kannada-English dictionary

Source: Alar: Kannada-English corpus

Kiṃkara (ಕಿಂಕರ):—[noun] worry a) the act of worrying; b) a troubled state of mind; distress.

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Kiṃkara (ಕಿಂಕರ):—[noun] a man held in servitude by or one that is completely subservient to, another; a slave.

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Kiṃkāra (ಕಿಂಕಾರ):—[noun] the sound produced by chiming bells.

context information

Kannada is a Dravidian language (as opposed to the Indo-European language family) mainly spoken in the southwestern region of India.

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