Khatika, Khaṭikā, Khaṭika, Khāṭikā: 15 definitions

Introduction

Introduction:

Khatika means something in Buddhism, Pali, Hinduism, Sanskrit, the history of ancient India, Marathi, Hindi. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

In Hinduism

Rasashastra (chemistry and alchemy)

Source: Wisdom Library: Rasa-śāstra

1) Khaṭikā (खटिका) is a Sanskrit technical term corresponding to “Chalk”, which is a form of limestone composed of calcite (a naturally occurring carbonate mineral). It is commonly used in Rasaśāstra literature (Medicinal Alchemy) such as the Rasaprakāśasudhākara or the Rasaratna-samuccaya. Khaṭikā is an ingredient often used in various Ayurvedic recipes and Alchemical preparations.

2) Khaṭikā (खटिका):—One of the two main varieties of Saurāṣṭrī (‘alum’), which is part of the uparasa group of eight minerals, according to the Rasaprakāśasudhākara: a 13th century Sanskrit book on Indian alchemy, or, Rasaśāstra. It has a white color but is not recommended for the Lohamāraṇa process.

Source: Indian Journal of History of Science: Rasaprakāśa-sudhākara, chapter 6

Khaṭikā is a variety of Tālaka (“Orpiment”).—It is white in colour and amla in taste. This variety is not used for lohamāraṇa purpose, instead, the other variety named Phullikā is used.

Rasashastra book cover
context information

Rasashastra (रसशास्त्र, rasaśāstra) is an important branch of Ayurveda, specialising in chemical interactions with herbs, metals and minerals. Some texts combine yogic and tantric practices with various alchemical operations. The ultimate goal of Rasashastra is not only to preserve and prolong life, but also to bestow wealth upon humankind.

Discover the meaning of khatika in the context of Rasashastra from relevant books on Exotic India

In Buddhism

General definition (in Buddhism)

Source: Google Books: In Praise of Dharmadhatu

Sanskrit. khaṭikā, Tibetan. rdo rgyus. Monier Williams has “chalk” and Bod rgya tshig mdzod chen mo says "a mineral that, when beaten, becomes like vulture downs.” All this matches the features of asbestos, which is a white, fibrous mineral that is fire-resistant and can easily be spun into yarn.

India history and geography

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Indian Epigraphical Glossary

Khāṭikā.—(Ep. Ind., Vol. IV, p. 253); the mouth of a river; same as Bengali khād8ī. Note: khāṭikā is defined in the “Indian epigraphical glossary” as it can be found on ancient inscriptions commonly written in Sanskrit, Prakrit or Dravidian languages.

India history book cover
context information

The history of India traces the identification of countries, villages, towns and other regions of India, as well as royal dynasties, rulers, tribes, local festivities and traditions and regional languages. Ancient India enjoyed religious freedom and encourages the path of Dharma, a concept common to Buddhism, Hinduism, and Jainism.

Discover the meaning of khatika in the context of India history from relevant books on Exotic India

Languages of India and abroad

Marathi-English dictionary

Source: DDSA: The Molesworth Marathi and English Dictionary

khāṭīka (खाटीक).—m (khāṭakīṇa fem khaṭṭika S) A tribe of Hindus, or an individual of it. They are Mutton-butchers.

context information

Marathi is an Indo-European language having over 70 million native speakers people in (predominantly) Maharashtra India. Marathi, like many other Indo-Aryan languages, evolved from early forms of Prakrit, which itself is a subset of Sanskrit, one of the most ancient languages of the world.

Discover the meaning of khatika in the context of Marathi from relevant books on Exotic India

Sanskrit dictionary

Source: DDSA: The practical Sanskrit-English dictionary

Khaṭika (खटिक).—The hand half-closed.

-kā 1 Chalk.

2) The external opening of the ear.

Derivable forms: khaṭikaḥ (खटिकः).

--- OR ---

Khāṭikā (खाटिका).—f. A bier, a bed-stead on which dead bodies are carried to the cemetery.

See also (synonyms): khāṭa, khāṭī.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Shabda-Sagara Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Khaṭika (खटिक).—m.

(-kaḥ) The fist, the hand closed. f.

(-kā) 1. Chalk. 2. The external opening of the ear. 3. A fragrant grass: (Andropogon muricatus.) E. khaṭ to seek or wish, vun affix, and iṭ inserted.

--- OR ---

Khāṭikā (खाटिका).—f.

(-kā) A bier: see khāṭa also khāṭī.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Benfey Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Khaṭikā (खटिका).—f. Chalk, [Prabodhacandrodaya, (ed. Brockhaus.)] 63, 8.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Cappeller Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Khaṭikā (खटिका).—[feminine] chalk.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Monier-Williams Sanskrit-English Dictionary

1) Khaṭikā (खटिका):—[from khaṭaka > khaṭa] a f. chalk, [Prabodha-candrodaya; Golādhyāya; Agni-purāṇa]

2) [v.s. ...] the external opening of the ear, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

3) [v.s. ...] Andropogon muricatus, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

4) Khaṭika (खटिक):—[from khaṭa] m. [varia lectio] for ṭaka q.v.

5) Khaṭikā (खटिका):—[from khaṭika > khaṭa] b f. See, [ib.]

6) Khātikā (खातिका):—[from khātaka > khan] f. a ditch, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

7) Khāṭikā (खाटिका):—[from khāṭa] f. (= khaṭṭ) a bier, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Yates Sanskrit-English Dictionary

1) Khaṭika (खटिक):—(kaḥ) 1. m. The fist doubled. f. () Chalk; opening of the ear; a fragrant grass.

2) Khāṭikā (खाटिका):—(kā) 1. f. A bier.

Source: DDSA: Paia-sadda-mahannavo; a comprehensive Prakrit Hindi dictionary (S)

Khaṭikā (खटिका) in the Sanskrit language is related to the Prakrit words: Khaḍiā, Khāiā.

[Sanskrit to German]

Khatika in German

context information

Sanskrit, also spelled संस्कृतम् (saṃskṛtam), is an ancient language of India commonly seen as the grandmother of the Indo-European language family (even English!). Closely allied with Prakrit and Pali, Sanskrit is more exhaustive in both grammar and terms and has the most extensive collection of literature in the world, greatly surpassing its sister-languages Greek and Latin.

Discover the meaning of khatika in the context of Sanskrit from relevant books on Exotic India

Hindi dictionary

[«previous next»] — Khatika in Hindi glossary
Source: DDSA: A practical Hindi-English dictionary

Khaṭīka (खटीक):—(nm) a low caste in the Hindu caste-hierarchy (whose main occupation is fruit-selling, pig-keeping and poultry farming etc.)

context information

...

Discover the meaning of khatika in the context of Hindi from relevant books on Exotic India

See also (Relevant definitions)

Relevant text

Like what you read? Consider supporting this website: