Khanjana, Khañjana, Khamjana: 17 definitions

Introduction:

Khanjana means something in Hinduism, Sanskrit, Buddhism, Pali, Marathi, Jainism, Prakrit. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

In Hinduism

Ayurveda (science of life)

Source: Shodhganga: Portrayal of Animal Kingdom (Tiryaks) in Epics An Analytical study

Khañjana (खञ्जन) refers to the White Wagtail (Motacilla alba), according to scientific texts such as the Mṛgapakṣiśāstra (Mriga-pakshi-shastra) or “the ancient Indian science of animals and birds” by Hamsadeva, containing the varieties and descriptions of the animals and birds seen in the Sanskrit Epics such as the Ramayana and Mahabharata.

Ayurveda book cover
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Āyurveda (आयुर्वेद, ayurveda) is a branch of Indian science dealing with medicine, herbalism, taxology, anatomy, surgery, alchemy and related topics. Traditional practice of Āyurveda in ancient India dates back to at least the first millenium BC. Literature is commonly written in Sanskrit using various poetic metres.

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Jyotisha (astronomy and astrology)

Source: Wisdom Library: Brihat Samhita by Varahamihira

Khañjana (खञ्जन) or Khañjanaka refers to “(prediction of future events from the flight of the) kañjana (a small black bird—the Gracular religiosa”, according to the Bṛhatsaṃhitā (chapter 2), an encyclopedic Sanskrit work written by Varāhamihira mainly focusing on the science of ancient Indian astronomy astronomy (Jyotiṣa).—Accordingly, “A true Astrologer is also one who has thoroughly mastered the Science of Saṃhitā. [...] It also treats of the prediction of events from the flight of the kañjana and from the appearance of various abnormal phenomena, of expiatory ceremonies; of miscellaneous planetary phenomena; of ghṛta-kambala; of the royal sword; of paṭa; of the features of a house cock, a cow, a sheep, a horse, an elephant, a man and a woman. It also treats of the treatment of women; of moles in the body; of injuries to shoes and clothes; of hairy fans; of walking sticks: of beds and seats; of lamplight; of tooth brush and the like”.

Jyotisha book cover
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Jyotisha (ज्योतिष, jyotiṣa or jyotish) refers to ‘astronomy’ or “Vedic astrology” and represents the fifth of the six Vedangas (additional sciences to be studied along with the Vedas). Jyotisha concerns itself with the study and prediction of the movements of celestial bodies, in order to calculate the auspicious time for rituals and ceremonies.

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Languages of India and abroad

Pali-English dictionary

[«previous next»] — Khanjana in Pali glossary
Source: BuddhaSasana: Concise Pali-English Dictionary

khañjana : (nt.) hobbling. (m.), a wagtail.

Source: Sutta: The Pali Text Society's Pali-English Dictionary

Khañjana, (nt.) hobbling, walking lame PvA. 185. (Page 231)

Pali book cover
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Pali is the language of the Tipiṭaka, which is the sacred canon of Theravāda Buddhism and contains much of the Buddha’s speech. Closeley related to Sanskrit, both languages are used interchangeably between religions.

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Marathi-English dictionary

Source: DDSA: The Molesworth Marathi and English Dictionary

khañjana (खंजन).—m S khañjarīṭa m S A wagtail, Motacilla alba.

Source: DDSA: The Aryabhusan school dictionary, Marathi-English

khañjana (खंजन).—m A wagtail.

context information

Marathi is an Indo-European language having over 70 million native speakers people in (predominantly) Maharashtra India. Marathi, like many other Indo-Aryan languages, evolved from early forms of Prakrit, which itself is a subset of Sanskrit, one of the most ancient languages of the world.

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Sanskrit dictionary

Source: DDSA: The practical Sanskrit-English dictionary

Khañjana (खञ्जन).—[khañj-lyuṭ]

1) A species of the wag-tail; स्फुटकमलोदरखेलितखञ्जनयुगमिव शरदि तडागम् (sphuṭakamalodarakhelitakhañjanayugamiva śaradi taḍāgam) Gīt.11; नेत्रे खञ्जनगञ्जने (netre khañjanagañjane) S. D; एको हि खञ्जनवरो नलिनीदलस्थः (eko hi khañjanavaro nalinīdalasthaḥ) Ś. Til.4,5.

-nā A kind of wag-tail.

2) Mustard.

-nam Going lamely.

Derivable forms: khañjanaḥ (खञ्जनः).

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Shabda-Sagara Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Khañjana (खञ्जन).—m.

(-naḥ) A small bird, the wag-tail, (Motacilla alba.) f.

(-nā) 1. A small kind of wag-tail. 2. Mustard. n.

(-naṃ) Going, moving. E. khaji to go lamely, affix lyu.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Benfey Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Khañjana (खञ्जन).—[khañj + ana], m. A wag-tail, Śriṅgārat. 4.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Cappeller Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Khañjana (खञ्जन).—[masculine] wagtail.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Monier-Williams Sanskrit-English Dictionary

1) Khañjana (खञ्जन):—[from khañj] m. the wagtail (Montacilla alba), [Varāha-mihira’s Bṛhat-saṃhitā; Suśruta] etc.

2) [v.s. ...] Name of a man [gana] śivādi

3) Khañjanā (खञ्जना):—[from khañjana > khañj] f. a kind of wagtail, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

4) Khañjana (खञ्जन):—[from khañj] n. going lamely, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Yates Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Khañjana (खञ्जन):—[(naḥ-nā)] 1. m. Idem. (naṃ) n. Going; limping.

Source: DDSA: Paia-sadda-mahannavo; a comprehensive Prakrit Hindi dictionary (S)

Khañjana (खञ्जन) in the Sanskrit language is related to the Prakrit word: Khaṃjaṇa.

[Sanskrit to German]

Khanjana in German

context information

Sanskrit, also spelled संस्कृतम् (saṃskṛtam), is an ancient language of India commonly seen as the grandmother of the Indo-European language family (even English!). Closely allied with Prakrit and Pali, Sanskrit is more exhaustive in both grammar and terms and has the most extensive collection of literature in the world, greatly surpassing its sister-languages Greek and Latin.

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Prakrit-English dictionary

Source: DDSA: Paia-sadda-mahannavo; a comprehensive Prakrit Hindi dictionary

1) Khaṃjaṇa (खंजण) in the Prakrit language is related to the Sanskrit word: Khañjana.

2) Khaṃjaṇa (खंजण) also relates to the Sanskrit word: Khañjana.

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Prakrit is an ancient language closely associated with both Pali and Sanskrit. Jain literature is often composed in this language or sub-dialects, such as the Agamas and their commentaries which are written in Ardhamagadhi and Maharashtri Prakrit. The earliest extant texts can be dated to as early as the 4th century BCE although core portions might be older.

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Kannada-English dictionary

Source: Alar: Kannada-English corpus

Khaṃjana (ಖಂಜನ):—[noun] a passerine bird Montacilla alba of Motacillidae family, having a long wing feathers and a very long tail that wags up and down; a variety of wagtail.

context information

Kannada is a Dravidian language (as opposed to the Indo-European language family) mainly spoken in the southwestern region of India.

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