Khanja, Khañja, Khañjā, Khamja: 17 definitions

Introduction:

Khanja means something in Hinduism, Sanskrit, Jainism, Prakrit, Buddhism, Pali, Marathi, Jainism, Prakrit. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

In Hinduism

Chandas (prosody, study of Sanskrit metres)

Source: Shodhganga: a concise history of Sanskrit Chanda literature

1) Khañjā (खञ्जा) refers to one of the twelve ardhasama-varṇavṛtta (semi-regular syllabo-quantitative verse) mentioned in the 333rd chapter of the Agnipurāṇa. The Agnipurāṇa deals with various subjects viz. literature, poetics, grammar, architecture in its 383 chapters and deals with the entire science of prosody (e.g., the khañjā metre) in 8 chapters (328-335) in 101 verses in total.

2) Khañjā (खञ्जा) refers to one of the thirty-four mātrāvṛtta (quantitative verse) mentioned in the Garuḍapurāṇa. The Garuḍapurāṇa also deals with the science of prosody (e.g., the khañjā) in its six chapters 207-212. The chapters comprise 5, 18, 41, 7 and 9 verses respectively.

Chandas book cover
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Chandas (छन्दस्) refers to Sanskrit prosody and represents one of the six Vedangas (auxiliary disciplines belonging to the study of the Vedas). The science of prosody (chandas-shastra) focusses on the study of the poetic meters such as the commonly known twenty-six metres mentioned by Pingalas.

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In Jainism

General definition (in Jainism)

Source: archive.org: Personal and geographical names in the Gupta inscriptions (jainism)

Khañja (खञ्ज, “lame”) is a Prakrit name indicating defects of the body, representing a rule when deriving personal names as mentioned in the Aṅgavijjā chapter 26. This chapter includes general rules to follow when deriving proper names. The Aṅgavijjā (mentioning khañja) is an ancient treatise from the 3rd century CE dealing with physiognomic readings, bodily gestures and predictions and was written by a Jain ascetic in 9000 Prakrit stanzas.

General definition book cover
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Jainism is an Indian religion of Dharma whose doctrine revolves around harmlessness (ahimsa) towards every living being. The two major branches (Digambara and Svetambara) of Jainism stimulate self-control (or, shramana, ‘self-reliance’) and spiritual development through a path of peace for the soul to progess to the ultimate goal.

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Languages of India and abroad

Pali-English dictionary

Source: BuddhaSasana: Concise Pali-English Dictionary

khañja : (adj.) lame.

Source: Sutta: The Pali Text Society's Pali-English Dictionary

Khañja, (adj.) (cp. Sk. khañja, Dhtp 81: khañja gativekalye) lame (either on one foot or both: PugA 227) Vin. II, 90=A. I, 107=II. 85=Pug. 51 (comb. with kāṇa and kuṇi); Th. 2, 438 (+kāṇa); DhA. I, 376 (+kuṇi). (Page 231)

Pali book cover
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Pali is the language of the Tipiṭaka, which is the sacred canon of Theravāda Buddhism and contains much of the Buddha’s speech. Closeley related to Sanskrit, both languages are used interchangeably between religions.

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Marathi-English dictionary

Source: DDSA: The Molesworth Marathi and English Dictionary

khañja (खंज).—a S Lame or crippled: also halt, limping, hobbling.

Source: DDSA: The Aryabhusan school dictionary, Marathi-English

khañja (खंज).—a Lame; halt.

context information

Marathi is an Indo-European language having over 70 million native speakers people in (predominantly) Maharashtra India. Marathi, like many other Indo-Aryan languages, evolved from early forms of Prakrit, which itself is a subset of Sanskrit, one of the most ancient languages of the world.

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Sanskrit dictionary

Source: DDSA: The practical Sanskrit-English dictionary

Khañja (खञ्ज).—a. [khañj-ac] Lame, crippled, halt; पादेन खञ्जः (pādena khañjaḥ) Sk.; Ms.8.274; कृशः काणः खञ्जः (kṛśaḥ kāṇaḥ khañjaḥ) (śvā) Bh.1.64.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Shabda-Sagara Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Khañja (खञ्ज).—mfn.

(-ñjaḥ-ñjā-ñjaṃ) Lame, crippled, limpling. f.

(-ñjā) A species of metre, a stanza of two lines, one of thirty-two, the other of thirty feet. E. khaji to limp or go lame, affix ac.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Benfey Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Khañja (खञ्ज).—[khañj + a], adj., f. , Lame, [Mānavadharmaśāstra] 3, 242.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Cappeller Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Khañja (खञ्ज).—[adjective] lame; [abstract] [feminine], tva [neuter]

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Monier-Williams Sanskrit-English Dictionary

1) Khañja (खञ्ज):—[from khañj] mfn. ([gana] kaḍārādi) idem, [Manu-smṛti; Suśruta; Bhartṛhari]

2) [v.s. ...] (with pādena, ‘limping with one leg’), [Pāṇini 2-3, 20], [Kāśikā-vṛtti]

3) Khañjā (खञ्जा):—[from khañja > khañj] f. Name of several metres (one consisting of 2 x 28 short syllables + 1 long and 30 short syllables + 1 long; another containing 30 short syllables + 1 long and 28 short syllables + 1 long; another containing 2 x 36 short syllables + 1 Amphimacer).

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Yates Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Khañja (खञ्ज):—[(ñjaḥ-ñjā-ñjaṃ) a.] Lame, limping.

Source: DDSA: Paia-sadda-mahannavo; a comprehensive Prakrit Hindi dictionary (S)

Khañja (खञ्ज) in the Sanskrit language is related to the Prakrit words: Khaṃja, Khaṃjā.

[Sanskrit to German]

Khanja in German

context information

Sanskrit, also spelled संस्कृतम् (saṃskṛtam), is an ancient language of India commonly seen as the grandmother of the Indo-European language family (even English!). Closely allied with Prakrit and Pali, Sanskrit is more exhaustive in both grammar and terms and has the most extensive collection of literature in the world, greatly surpassing its sister-languages Greek and Latin.

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Prakrit-English dictionary

Source: DDSA: Paia-sadda-mahannavo; a comprehensive Prakrit Hindi dictionary

1) Khaṃja (खंज) in the Prakrit language is related to the Sanskrit word: Khañj.

2) Khaṃja (खंज) also relates to the Sanskrit word: Khañja.

3) Khaṃja (खंज) also relates to the Sanskrit word: Khañja.

4) Khaṃjā (खंजा) also relates to the Sanskrit word: Khañjā.

context information

Prakrit is an ancient language closely associated with both Pali and Sanskrit. Jain literature is often composed in this language or sub-dialects, such as the Agamas and their commentaries which are written in Ardhamagadhi and Maharashtri Prakrit. The earliest extant texts can be dated to as early as the 4th century BCE although core portions might be older.

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Kannada-English dictionary

Source: Alar: Kannada-English corpus

Khaṃja (ಖಂಜ):—[noun] a man who is disabled in the foot or leg, hence unable to walk normally; a lame man.

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Kannada is a Dravidian language (as opposed to the Indo-European language family) mainly spoken in the southwestern region of India.

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