Khandava, Khāṇḍava, Khamdava: 17 definitions

Introduction:

Khandava means something in Hinduism, Sanskrit, Marathi, Jainism, Prakrit. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

In Hinduism

Purana and Itihasa (epic history)

[«previous next»] — Khandava in Purana glossary
Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: The Purana Index

1a) Khāṇḍava (खाण्डव).—Forest burnt by Arjuna, and Maya was liberated from the fire. Here Arjuna defeated Indra.*

  • * Bhāgavata-purāṇa I. 15. 8; X. 58. 25-7; 71. 45-46; 89. 34 [4].

1b) An Arṣeya pravara of Bhārgavas.*

  • * Matsya-purāṇa 195. 40.
Source: JatLand: List of Mahabharata people and places

Khāṇḍava (खाण्डव) refers to the name of a Forest mentioned in the Mahābhārata (cf. IV.2.9). Note: The Mahābhārata (mentioning Khāṇḍava) is a Sanskrit epic poem consisting of 100,000 ślokas (metrical verses) and is over 2000 years old.

Purana book cover
context information

The Purana (पुराण, purāṇas) refers to Sanskrit literature preserving ancient India’s vast cultural history, including historical legends, religious ceremonies, various arts and sciences. The eighteen mahapuranas total over 400,000 shlokas (metrical couplets) and date to at least several centuries BCE.

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Ayurveda (science of life)

Source: archive.org: Vagbhata’s Ashtanga Hridaya Samhita (first 5 chapters)

Khāṇḍava (खाण्डव) refers to a type of food-preparation, as mentioned in verse 3.30 of the Aṣṭāṅgahṛdayasaṃhitā (Sūtrasthāna) by Vāgbhaṭa.—Accordingly, “[...] One shall eat rice (that is) white like jasmine [viz., kunda] and the moon, (together) with the meat of game. One shall drink broth (that is) not too thick, rasālā, curds, rāga and khāṇḍava syrup, [...]”.

Note: Rasālā, which denotes a certain kind of thick milk mixed with sugar and spices, has been rendered merely by źo (“curds”), evidently for lack of an adequate term. A similar reason accounts for the lengthy paraphrase of rāgakhāṇḍavau (written rāgaṣāḍabau in K) as bu-ram sbyar sogs gyos byas btuṅ phal-cher skyur-ba—“a potion (that is) concocted from treacle products etc. (and) preponderantly sour”, which led to the insertion of a supernumerary hemistich.—bu-rum in C is nothing but a mistake.
 

Source: Shodhganga: Dietetics and culinary art in ancient and medieval India

Khāṇḍava (खाण्डव) refers to a type of sweet food-preparation, according to the Vālmīkirāmāyaṇa.Bālakāṇḍa 53.4 (also Mahābhārata Aśvamedhaparva 41.89), and is commonly found in literature dealing with the topics of dietetics and culinary art, also known as Pākaśāstra or Pākakalā.—Khāṇḍava is a good variety of sweet that is referred to in both the epics.

Ayurveda book cover
context information

Āyurveda (आयुर्वेद, ayurveda) is a branch of Indian science dealing with medicine, herbalism, taxology, anatomy, surgery, alchemy and related topics. Traditional practice of Āyurveda in ancient India dates back to at least the first millenium BC. Literature is commonly written in Sanskrit using various poetic metres.

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Languages of India and abroad

Marathi-English dictionary

Source: DDSA: The Molesworth Marathi and English Dictionary

khāṇḍava (खांडव) [or वा, vā].—m (khāṇḍa) A dry bank or a shoal in a river; an intermitted deep. See khāḍaḍōha.

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khāṇḍava (खांडव).—m Descending the gamut. v kara.

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khāṇḍavā (खांडवा).—m The jhōḷī or bag which contains the viḍē & supārī prepared for distribution at weddings.

Source: DDSA: The Aryabhusan school dictionary, Marathi-English

khāṇḍava (खांडव).—m A dry shoal in a river.

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khāṇḍavā (खांडवा).—m The bag containing viḍē and supārī.

context information

Marathi is an Indo-European language having over 70 million native speakers people in (predominantly) Maharashtra India. Marathi, like many other Indo-Aryan languages, evolved from early forms of Prakrit, which itself is a subset of Sanskrit, one of the most ancient languages of the world.

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Sanskrit dictionary

Source: DDSA: The practical Sanskrit-English dictionary

Khāṇḍava (खाण्डव).—Sugar-candy.

-vam Name of a forest in Kurukṣetra, sacred to Indra, and burnt by Agni with the assistance of Arjuna and Kṛṣṇa; यत्सन्निधावहमु खाण्डवम- ग्नयेऽदाम् (yatsannidhāvahamu khāṇḍavama- gnaye'dām) Bhāgavata 1.15.8.

Derivable forms: khāṇḍavaḥ (खाण्डवः).

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Shabda-Sagara Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Khāṇḍava (खाण्डव).—n.

(-vaṃ) A wood, sacred to Indra.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Benfey Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Khāṇḍava (खाण्डव).—i. e. khaṇḍ + u + a, m. 1. Sweetmeats, [Rāmāyaṇa] 1, 53, 4. 2. The name of a forest, Mahābhārata 1, 316.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Cappeller Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Khāṇḍava (खाण्डव).—[masculine] a cert. sweetmeat (also [neuter]); [Name] of a sacred wood.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Monier-Williams Sanskrit-English Dictionary

1) Khaṇḍava (खण्डव):—[from khaṇḍ] mn. (cf. khāṇḍ) ? [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

2) [v.s. ...] m. for ṇḍara q.v.

3) Khāṇḍava (खाण्डव):—[from khāṇḍa] mn. sugar-candy, sugar-plums, sweetmeats, [Mahābhārata xiii; Rāmāyaṇa i, vii]

4) [v.s. ...] Name of a forest in Kuru-kṣetra (sacred to Indra and burnt by the god of fire aided by Arjuna and Kṛṣṇa, [Mahābhārata; Harivaṃśa; Bhāgavata-purāṇa i, 15, 8; Kathāsaritsāgara]), [Tāṇḍya-brāhmaṇa xxv, 3; Taittirīya-āraṇyaka]

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Yates Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Khāṇḍava (खाण्डव):—(vaṃ) 1. n. A wood of Indra.

Source: DDSA: Paia-sadda-mahannavo; a comprehensive Prakrit Hindi dictionary (S)

Khāṇḍava (खाण्डव) in the Sanskrit language is related to the Prakrit word: Khaṃḍava.

[Sanskrit to German]

Khandava in German

context information

Sanskrit, also spelled संस्कृतम् (saṃskṛtam), is an ancient language of India commonly seen as the grandmother of the Indo-European language family (even English!). Closely allied with Prakrit and Pali, Sanskrit is more exhaustive in both grammar and terms and has the most extensive collection of literature in the world, greatly surpassing its sister-languages Greek and Latin.

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Prakrit-English dictionary

Source: DDSA: Paia-sadda-mahannavo; a comprehensive Prakrit Hindi dictionary

Khaṃḍava (खंडव) in the Prakrit language is related to the Sanskrit word: Khāṇḍava.

context information

Prakrit is an ancient language closely associated with both Pali and Sanskrit. Jain literature is often composed in this language or sub-dialects, such as the Agamas and their commentaries which are written in Ardhamagadhi and Maharashtri Prakrit. The earliest extant texts can be dated to as early as the 4th century BCE although core portions might be older.

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Kannada-English dictionary

Source: Alar: Kannada-English corpus

Khāṃḍava (ಖಾಂಡವ):—[noun] (in epic Mahābhārata) name of the forest or pleasure garden of Indra, devoured by the Fire-God with the help of Arjuna.

context information

Kannada is a Dravidian language (as opposed to the Indo-European language family) mainly spoken in the southwestern region of India.

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