Karpara: 7 definitions

Introduction

Karpara means something in Hinduism, Sanskrit. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

In Hinduism

Purana and Itihasa (epic history)

Source: archive.org: Puranic Encyclopedia

Karpara (कर्पर).—See under Ghaṭa.

Purana book cover
context information

The Purana (पुराण, purāṇas) refers to Sanskrit literature preserving ancient India’s vast cultural history, including historical legends, religious ceremonies, various arts and sciences. The eighteen mahapuranas total over 400,000 shlokas (metrical couplets) and date to at least several centuries BCE.

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Kavya (poetry)

[«previous (K) next»] — Karpara in Kavya glossary
Source: Wisdom Library: Kathāsaritsāgara

Karpara (कर्पर) is the name of a thief (caura), according to the Kathāsaritsāgara, chapter 64. Accordingly, “... there were in a certain city two thieves, named Ghaṭa and Karpara. One night Karpara left Ghaṭa outside the palace, and breaking through the wall, entered the bed-chamber of the princess...”.

The Kathāsaritsāgara (‘ocean of streams of story’), mentioning Karpara, is a famous Sanskrit epic story revolving around prince Naravāhanadatta and his quest to become the emperor of the vidyādharas (celestial beings). The work is said to have been an adaptation of Guṇāḍhya’s Bṛhatkathā consisting of 100,000 verses, which in turn is part of a larger work containing 700,000 verses.

context information

Kavya (काव्य, kavya) refers to Sanskrit poetry, a popular ancient Indian tradition of literature. There have been many Sanskrit poets over the ages, hailing from ancient India and beyond. This topic includes mahakavya, or ‘epic poetry’ and natya, or ‘dramatic poetry’.

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Languages of India and abroad

Sanskrit-English dictionary

Source: DDSA: The practical Sanskrit-English dictionary

Karpara (कर्पर).—

1) An iron sauce-pan, a frying-pan.

2) A pot or vessel in general (as of a potter).

3) A pot-sherd, piece of a broken jar; as in घटकर्पर (ghaṭakarpara); जीयेय येन कविना यमकैः परेण तस्मै वहेयमुदकं घटकर्परेण (jīyeya yena kavinā yamakaiḥ pareṇa tasmai vaheyamudakaṃ ghaṭakarpareṇa) Ghaṭ.22.

4) The skull.

5) A kind of weapon.

6) A back-bone; न्यञ्चत्कर्परकूर्म (nyañcatkarparakūrma) Māl.5.22.

-ram A pot, pot-sherd.

Derivable forms: karparaḥ (कर्परः).

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Shabda-Sagara Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Karpara (कर्पर).—m.

(-raḥ) 1. The skull, the cranium. 2. An iron saucepan or frying pan. 3. A kind of weapon. 4. The Glomerous fig tree: see uḍumbara. f. (-rī) A collyrium extracted from the Amomum anthorhiza, Rox. E. kṛp to be able, aran aff.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Benfey Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Karpara (कर्पर).— (see karpaṭa), n. 1. A pot, [Pañcatantra] 218, 11. 2. A potsherd, [Pañcatantra] 217, 22.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Cappeller Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Karpara (कर्पर).—[masculine] cup, pot; a turtle’s shell.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Monier-Williams Sanskrit-English Dictionary

1) Karpara (कर्पर):—m. a cup, pot, bowl, [Pañcatantra; Kathāsaritsāgara] etc.

2) the skull, cranium, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

3) the shell of a tortoise

4) a kind of weapon, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

5) Ficus glomerata, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

6) Name of a thief, [Kathāsaritsāgara lxiv, 43 ff.]

7) n. a pot, potsherd, [Pañcatantra]

context information

Sanskrit, also spelled संस्कृतम् (saṃskṛtam), is an ancient language of India commonly seen as the grandmother of the Indo-European language family. Closely allied with Prakrit and Pali, Sanskrit is more exhaustive in both grammar and terms and has the most extensive collection of literature in the world, greatly surpassing its sister-languages Greek and Latin.

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