Karin, Kārin, Kārī, Kāri, Kari: 29 definitions

Introduction:

Karin means something in Hinduism, Sanskrit, Jainism, Prakrit, Buddhism, Pali, Marathi, Hindi, biology. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

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In Hinduism

Shaktism (Shakta philosophy)

Source: Google Books: Manthanabhairavatantram

Kārin (कारिन्) refers to “one who generates”, according to the Manthānabhairavatantra.—Accordingly, “From the root (of all things) Śāmbhavīśakti is Bhairavī the energy that is full (bharitā) (of all the energies). [...] She generates the energy of eternal bliss [i.e., nityānanda-kalā-kārin] and has merged into the Bliss of Stillness (nirānanda—i.e. Śiva). Blissful and delighted, she is satisfied and her form is blissful. She is the supreme Command and her form is the Void (śūnya). She pierces through the moving and immobile (universe). Her nature is the Void (vyomarūpā) and she resides within the secret (guhya) Void (vyoman). The energy that utters itself, she abides as 100,000 repetitions of mantra. She is Kāmeśvarī who, as the power of the will (kāmaśakti), has comes forth from the centre of the Point”.

Shaktism book cover
context information

Shakta (शाक्त, śākta) or Shaktism (śāktism) represents a tradition of Hinduism where the Goddess (Devi) is revered and worshipped. Shakta literature includes a range of scriptures, including various Agamas and Tantras, although its roots may be traced back to the Vedas.

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Jyotisha (astronomy and astrology)

Source: Wisdom Library: Brihat Samhita by Varahamihira

1) Karin (करिन्) refers to “elephants”, according to the Bṛhatsaṃhitā (chapter 2), an encyclopedic Sanskrit work written by Varāhamihira mainly focusing on the science of ancient Indian astronomy astronomy (Jyotiṣa).—Accordingly, “[...] He, who well knows the Horā, the Gaṇita and the Saṃhitā śāstras, ought to be respected by the prince who loves victory and admitted into his court. That service, which a single Jyotiṣaka, having a knowledge of place and time can render to a prince, cannot be rendered to him by a thousand elephants [i.e., karin] or by four thousand horses”

2) Kari (करि) [=Hari?] refers to “lions” [?], according to the Bṛhatsaṃhitā (chapter 12).—Accordingly, “Hear now the effects of the heliacal rising of Canopus (Agastya), a star sacred to Agastya who suppressed the Vindhya mountains whose soaring heights obstructed the course of the Sun; to which the pictured robes of the Vidyādhara females leaning for support on their lord’s arms and flying aloft in the sky formed beautiful flowing flags; whose caves were the abodes of lions [i.e., kari-kaṭa] which, having drunk of the perfumed blood of elephants in rut had their mouths covered with bees that looked like so many black flowers, and from which caves issued rivers; [...]”.

Jyotisha book cover
context information

Jyotisha (ज्योतिष, jyotiṣa or jyotish) refers to ‘astronomy’ or “Vedic astrology” and represents the fifth of the six Vedangas (additional sciences to be studied along with the Vedas). Jyotisha concerns itself with the study and prediction of the movements of celestial bodies, in order to calculate the auspicious time for rituals and ceremonies.

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Ayurveda (science of life)

Source: Wisdom Library: Local Names of Plants and Drugs

Karin [करीं] in the Hindi language is the name of a plant identified with Capparis decidua (Forssk.) Edgew. from the Capparaceae (Caper) family. For the possible medicinal usage of karin, you can check this page for potential sources and references, although be aware that any some or none of the side-effects may not be mentioned here, wether they be harmful or beneficial to health.

Source: Wisdom Library: Local Names of Plants and Drugs

Kari in the Malayalam language is the name of a plant identified with Diospyros melanoxylon Roxb. from the Ebenaceae (Ebony) family having the following synonyms: Diospyros tupru, Diospyros dubia, Diospyros wightiana. For the possible medicinal usage of kari, you can check this page for potential sources and references, although be aware that any some or none of the side-effects may not be mentioned here, wether they be harmful or beneficial to health.

Kari [करी] in the Hindi language is the name of a plant identified with Miliusa tomentosa (Roxb.) J.Sinclair from the Annonaceae (Sugar-apple) family having the following synonyms: Uvaria tomentosa, Saccopetalum tomentosum.

Kari in the Malayalam language is the name of a plant identified with Diospyros ebenum J.König ex Retz. from the Ebenaceae (Ebony) family having the following synonyms: Diospyros ebenaster, Diospyros assimilis, Diospyros timoriana.

Kari [ಕರಿ] in the Kannada language is the name of a plant identified with Diospyros vera (Lour.) A.Chev. from the Ebenaceae (Ebony) family having the following synonyms: Diospyros angustifolia (Miq.) Kosterm. [Illegitimate], Maba nigrescens.

Kari [കാരി] in the Malayalam language is the name of a plant identified with Diospyros paniculata Dalzell from the Ebenaceae (Ebony) family.

Kari [காரி] in the Tamil language, ibid. previous identification.

Kari in the Sanskrit language is the name of a plant identified with Psydrax umbellata from the Rubiaceae (Coffee) family having the following synonyms: Canthium umbellatum, Canthium umbellulatum, Plectronia umbellata.

Ayurveda book cover
context information

Āyurveda (आयुर्वेद, ayurveda) is a branch of Indian science dealing with medicine, herbalism, taxology, anatomy, surgery, alchemy and related topics. Traditional practice of Āyurveda in ancient India dates back to at least the first millenium BC. Literature is commonly written in Sanskrit using various poetic metres.

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Shaivism (Shaiva philosophy)

Source: Brill: Śaivism and the Tantric Traditions

Kārin (कारिन्) refers to “those who perform (their own duties)”, according to Tantrālokaviveka commentary on the Tantrāloka verses 4.228ab.—Accordingly, “[‘As regards the Yogin, moreover, that purity exists with respect to (all) entities’].—Indeed, the majority of bound souls do not perceive even (Śaiva) mantras as having Śiva-nature, and therefore they suppose them to be impure, since they fail (even) to perform their own duties (svakārya-kārin) (in employing these mantras). But, as for the Yogin, he perceives (everything,) beginning with the earth, as having that [Śiva-nature]. Therefore, (he perceives that) all of them without exception are completely pure. Indeed, this alone is the very nature of the Yogin as a Yogin, that he perceives this entire universe as possessed of Śiva-nature. This is definitive”.

Shaivism book cover
context information

Shaiva (शैव, śaiva) or Shaivism (śaivism) represents a tradition of Hinduism worshiping Shiva as the supreme being. Closely related to Shaktism, Shaiva literature includes a range of scriptures, including Tantras, while the root of this tradition may be traced back to the ancient Vedas.

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In Jainism

General definition (in Jainism)

Source: archive.org: Een Kritische Studie Van Svayambhūdeva’s Paümacariu

Karin (करिन्) participated in the war between Rāma and Rāvaṇa, on the side of the latter, as mentioned in Svayambhūdeva’s Paumacariu (Padmacarita, Paumacariya or Rāmāyaṇapurāṇa) chapter 57ff. Svayambhū or Svayambhūdeva (8th or 9th century) was a Jain householder who probably lived in Karnataka. His work recounts the popular Rāma story as known from the older work Rāmāyaṇa (written by Vālmīki). Various chapters [mentioning Karin] are dedicated to the humongous battle whose armies (known as akṣauhiṇīs) consisted of millions of soldiers, horses and elephants, etc.

Source: The University of Sydney: A study of the Twelve Reflections

Karin (करिन्) refers to “elephants”, according to the 11th century Jñānārṇava, a treatise on Jain Yoga in roughly 2200 Sanskrit verses composed by Śubhacandra.—Accordingly, “This most powerful [and] cruel death devours against their will the life of those who possess a body that has settled in the middle world, in hell, in the world of Brahmā, in Indra’s abode, in the middle of the ocean, inside the forest, at all quarters of the globe, on a mountain-peak, in a place difficult of access on account of fire, forest, cold, darkness, thunderbolts [and] swords, or in [a place] crowded with a troop of ruttish elephants (samada-karin-ghaṭāsaṃkaṭa)”.

General definition book cover
context information

Jainism is an Indian religion of Dharma whose doctrine revolves around harmlessness (ahimsa) towards every living being. The two major branches (Digambara and Svetambara) of Jainism stimulate self-control (or, shramana, ‘self-reliance’) and spiritual development through a path of peace for the soul to progess to the ultimate goal.

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Languages of India and abroad

Pali-English dictionary

Source: BuddhaSasana: Concise Pali-English Dictionary

kari : (aor. of karoti) did; acted; made; built. || karī (m.), an elephant. kārī (m.), doer. (Mostly in cpds. such as sātāccakārī).

Source: Sutta: The Pali Text Society's Pali-English Dictionary

Kārin, (-°) (adj.) doing: yathāvādī tathākārī “as he says so he does” D. III, 135, Sn. 357; see for examples the various cpds. as kamma°, kibbisa°, khaṇḍa°, chidda°, dukkaṭa°, dvaya°, paccakkha°, pubba°, sakkacca°, sampajāna°, etc. (Page 210)

— or —

Karin, (adj.) (fr. kara) “one who has a hand, ” an elephant (cp. hatthin) Mhvs 24, 34; 25, 68; Dāvs. IV, 2. In cpds. kari.

Pali book cover
context information

Pali is the language of the Tipiṭaka, which is the sacred canon of Theravāda Buddhism and contains much of the Buddha’s speech. Closeley related to Sanskrit, both languages are used interchangeably between religions.

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Marathi-English dictionary

Source: DDSA: The Molesworth Marathi and English Dictionary

Karī (करी).—m (karīṇa fem. karaṇēṃ To do.) An affix to nouns implying I. The possessor, master, lord, or rightful person. Ex. paikēkarī A monied man; gharakarī The master of the house; mānakarī The person entitled to receive the honors. 2 The inhabitant, or the person belonging to. Ex. gāṃva- karī A man of the village. 3 The dealer in; the worker, laborer, occupant in, by way of subsistence. Ex. kāpaḍakarī, bhāḍēkarī, śētakarī, bhikṣē- karī. 4 The bearer or carrier, as iṭēkarī; or practiser of, as paṭṭēkarī; the mere performer, as yātrēkarī, mārēkarī. karī has other senses, of which the explanations will appear under the respective leading words. These are given here because they are the most frequent; and because the words to which karī thus significant is affixed, being too numerous for insertion, are omitted. karī however may not be employed so arbitrarily as vālā: hence the admission of so many of the formations with it. 5 An adjective form of kara (the affix to the names of towns) expressing Relation, as puṇēkarī Belonging to, like &c., the people of Poona.

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karī (करी).—m (S Having a hand.) An elephant.

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kārī (कारी).—a (S) That does, performs, makes. Used freely in comp. as kaphakārī, pittakārī, vātakārī, kṣayakārī, vṛddhikārī, guṇakārī. This affix, like kāraka q. v., forms classical and serviceable adjectives ad libitum.

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kārī (कारी).—f Any kind of pitch used in paying ships or boats.

Source: DDSA: The Aryabhusan school dictionary, Marathi-English

Karī (करी).—m An elephant. An affix to nouns implying the master; the dealer in; the bearer, etc.

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kārī (कारी).—a That makes, performs.

context information

Marathi is an Indo-European language having over 70 million native speakers people in (predominantly) Maharashtra India. Marathi, like many other Indo-Aryan languages, evolved from early forms of Prakrit, which itself is a subset of Sanskrit, one of the most ancient languages of the world.

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Sanskrit dictionary

Source: DDSA: The practical Sanskrit-English dictionary

Karin (करिन्).—m. [kara-ini]

1) An elephant.

2) The number '8' (in Math.)

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Kārin (कारिन्).—a. Making, doing, causing, bringing about (at the end of comp.). -m. A mechanic, artist preparer न कारिसोमं प्रपपौ अग्ने (na kārisomaṃ prapapau agne) Mahābhārata on III.2.115.

Source: DDSA: The practical Sanskrit-English dictionary

Kāri (कारि).—f. Action, act, work; यां कारिं राजपुत्रोऽयमनुतिष्ठति (yāṃ kāriṃ rājaputro'yamanutiṣṭhati) ... Bhaṭṭikāvya 7.75. -m. An artist, a mechanic.

Derivable forms: kāriḥ (कारिः).

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Shabda-Sagara Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Karin (करिन्).—m. (-rī) An elephant. E. kara the proboscis of this animal, and ini aff.

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Kārin (कारिन्).—mfn. (-rī-riṇī-ri) An actor, acting, doing. E. kṛ to do, ṇini aff.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Shabda-Sagara Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Kāri (कारि).—mfn. (-riḥ-riḥ-ri) An artist, an artificer. f.

(-riḥ) Action, act, agency. E. kṛñ to do, and in Unadi aff.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Benfey Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Karin (करिन्).—i. e. kara + in, I. m. An elephant, [Kirātārjunīya] 5, 7. Ii. f. iṇī, A female elephant, [Bhartṛhari, (ed. Bohlen.)] 3, 82.

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Kārin (कारिन्).—i. e. kri + in, adj., f. iṇī, An agent, [Rāmāyaṇa] 2, 78, 8; Mahābhārata 13, 4804; acting, [Mānavadharmaśāstra] 7, 26.

— It is generally the latter part of a comp. adj., e. g. a-kārya-, adj. 1. One who does a wrong action, [Mānavadharmaśāstra] 11, 239. 2. One who does not what ought to be done, i. e. who neglects his duty, Man, 5, 107. a-kliṣṭa-, adj. Indefatigable, [Rāmāyaṇa] 3, 31, 1. āpta-, adj. Acting properly, [Mānavadharmaśāstra] 9, 12 (in a trustworthy manner). keśa-, m. f. iṇī, A hair-dresser, Mahābhārata 4, 412. kṣipra-, adj. Clever, [Rāmāyaṇa] 3, 36, 10. gṛha-, m. A kind of wasp. [Mānavadharmaśāstra] 12, 66. tatkarmakārin, i. e. tad -karman-, adj. Doing the same, [Mānavadharmaśāstra] 9, 261. dṛḍha-, adj. Persevering in good actions, [Mānavadharmaśāstra] 4, 246. vighna-, adj. 1. Obstructing. 2. Fearful.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Cappeller Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Karin (करिन्).—[masculine] ṇī [feminine] an elephant (lit. having a trunk).

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Kārin (कारिन्).—1. [adjective] doing, making, causing, acting ([with] [genetive], [adverb], or —°).

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Kārin (कारिन्).—2. [adjective] praising, exulting; [masculine] singer, poet.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Monier-Williams Sanskrit-English Dictionary

1) Kari (करि):—[from kara] 1. kari mfn. (ifc.) causing, accomplishing (cf. śakṛt-k)

2) [v.s. ...] m. the hand, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

3) [v.s. ...] 2. kari (in [compound] for karin [column]3).

4) a etc. See p. 254, col. 2.

5) Kārī (कारी):—[from kāra] f. Name of a plant (= kārikā, kāryā etc.), [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

6) Kāri (कारि):—[from kāra] 1. kāri mf. an artist, artificer, mechanic, [Pāṇini 4-1, 152]

7) [v.s. ...] f. action, act, work (only used in questions), [Pāṇini 3-3, 110.]

8) [from kāra] 2. kāri mfn. raising hymns of praise, [Vājasaneyi-saṃhitā xxx, 6 and 20.]

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Monier-Williams Sanskrit-English Dictionary

1) Karin (करिन्):—[from kara] mfn. doing, effecting etc., [Kāśikā-vṛtti on Pāṇini 2-3, 70]

2) [v.s. ...] m. ‘having a trunk’, an elephant, [Mahābhārata; Bhāgavata-purāṇa; Pañcatantra etc.]

3) Kārin (कारिन्):—[from kāra] 1. kārin mfn. ([Pāṇini 5-2, 72]) doing, making, effecting, producing, acting, an actor, [Yājñavalkya; Mahābhārata] etc. (mostly ifc. [Śatapatha-brāhmaṇa; Manu-smṛti] etc.)

4) [v.s. ...] m. a mechanic, tradesman, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

5) [v.s. ...] 1. ([according to] to some in [Ṛg-veda] also, kārin, ‘conquering, victorious’).

6) [from kāra] 2. kārin mfn. rejoicing, praising, [Ṛg-veda]

7) [from kṝ] 3. kārin 3 mfn. ([from] √kṝ) scattering, destroying, [Śiśupāla-vadha]

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Yates Sanskrit-English Dictionary

1) Karin (करिन्):—(rī) 5. m. An elephant.

2) Kārin (कारिन्):—[(rī-riṇī-ri) a.] Doing.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Yates Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Kāri (कारि):—(riḥ) 2. f. Action; artist.

Source: DDSA: Paia-sadda-mahannavo; a comprehensive Prakrit Hindi dictionary (S)

Karin (करिन्) in the Sanskrit language is related to the Prakrit words: Kari, Kariṇa, Kāri.

[Sanskrit to German]

Karin in German

context information

Sanskrit, also spelled संस्कृतम् (saṃskṛtam), is an ancient language of India commonly seen as the grandmother of the Indo-European language family (even English!). Closely allied with Prakrit and Pali, Sanskrit is more exhaustive in both grammar and terms and has the most extensive collection of literature in the world, greatly surpassing its sister-languages Greek and Latin.

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Hindi dictionary

Source: DDSA: A practical Hindi-English dictionary

Kārī (कारी):——a suffix denoting performance of an act or a doer, e.g. [kalyāṇakārī].

context information

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Prakrit-English dictionary

Source: DDSA: Paia-sadda-mahannavo; a comprehensive Prakrit Hindi dictionary

1) Kari (करि) in the Prakrit language is related to the Sanskrit word: Karin.

2) Kāri (कारि) also relates to the Sanskrit word: Kārin.

context information

Prakrit is an ancient language closely associated with both Pali and Sanskrit. Jain literature is often composed in this language or sub-dialects, such as the Agamas and their commentaries which are written in Ardhamagadhi and Maharashtri Prakrit. The earliest extant texts can be dated to as early as the 4th century BCE although core portions might be older.

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Kannada-English dictionary

Source: Alar: Kannada-English corpus

Kari (ಕರಿ):—

1) [verb] to be charred; to be reduced to charcoal from burning.

2) [verb] to heat something in a pan or directly in fire.

3) [verb] to cook in a pan in hot oil.

4) [verb] (fig.) to undergo sever pain or affliction.

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Kari (ಕರಿ):—

1) [adjective] intensely dark in colour; opposite to white; of the color of coal or pitch; black.

2) [adjective] ಕರಿಕುತ್ರಿ [karikutri] kari kutri (dial.) (derog.) a person of very dark complexion.

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Kari (ಕರಿ):—

1) [noun] the state of being charred or reduced to charcoal from burning.

2) [noun] that which is burnt competely or reduced to charcoal.

3) [noun] the black colour.

4) [noun] religious defilement.

5) [noun] the day following the day of eclipse, solstice or new moon-day.

6) [noun] a plant disease.

7) [noun] the cobweb holding dust and has turned black.

8) [noun] a black substance consisting chiefly of carbon particles formed by the incomplete combustion of burning matter; soot.

9) [noun] ಕರಿಯಾಗು [kariyagu] kariyāgu to be scorched; to be charred; ಕರಿಕರಿಯಾಗು [karikariyagu] karikariyāgu to be reduced completely to charcoal by burning;ಕರಿಯ [kariya](ನ್ನು [nnu]) ಹರಿ [hari] karaya(nnu) hari to drive the bullocks fast on the day following the day of eclipse, solstice, etc. to clear the religious defilement of the previous day.

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Kari (ಕರಿ):—[noun] a kind of herb.

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Kari (ಕರಿ):—

1) [noun] the animal that has a trunk; an elephant.

2) [noun] a symbol for the number eight; 8.

3) [noun] a mirror (of glass) or a smooth metal surface reflecting the image.

4) [noun] the lotus flower.

5) [noun] the musk, a kind of perfume, obtained from the glands of musk-deer.

6) [noun] a serpant.

7) [noun] the bird swan.

8) [noun] fame; renown; favourable reputation.

9) [noun] a mountain.

10) [noun] lustre; effulgence; brightness.

11) [noun] a horse.

12) [noun] Viṣṇu.

13) [noun] (pros.) a kind of alliteration in which the first vowel of each line is long, and the consonant following it recurs at corresponding place of all the lines in a stanza.

14) [noun] the tree Maba nigrescens of Ebenaceae family.

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Kaṟi (ಕಱಿ):—[noun] = ಕಱೆ [kare]2.

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Kāri (ಕಾರಿ):—[noun] a black coloured ox.

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Kāri (ಕಾರಿ):—

1) [noun] a piece or tract of land that is rich in salt or salts; a brackish land.

2) [noun] a part of a sea or lake, indenting the shoreline; wide inlet not so large as a gulf.

3) [noun] a shallow place in a stream, river, etc., where one can cross by wading, by riding on horseback, etc.; a ford.

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Kāri (ಕಾರಿ):—[noun] any of a family (Picidae) of piciform birds distinguished by stiff tail feathers used for support, a strong, pointed, chisel-shaped bill used for drilling holes in bark to get insects, and a long, protrusile tongue with a spearlike tip; a woodpecker.

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Kāri (ಕಾರಿ):—

1) [noun] an act of making, doing, causing, etc.

2) [noun] a man who makes, creates, as an artist, mechanic, actor, etc.

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Kāri (ಕಾರಿ):—[noun] the tree Clerodendrum viscosum (= C. infortunatum) of Verbenaceae family.

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Kāri (ಕಾರಿ):—[noun] (dial.) the nest of a crow.

context information

Kannada is a Dravidian language (as opposed to the Indo-European language family) mainly spoken in the southwestern region of India.

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