Kanyadana, aka: Kanyādāna, Kanya-dana; 6 Definition(s)

Introduction

Kanyadana means something in Hinduism, Sanskrit, the history of ancient India, Marathi. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

In Hinduism

Shaktism (Shakta philosophy)

Kanyadana in Shaktism glossary... « previous · [K] · next »

Kanyādāna (कन्यादान).—Marriage ceremony; where the girl is given as a gift to groom’s family. This is only a gift and no monetary or material transactions are involved. Bride’s father is the one, who gives the gift to the groom.

Source: Manblunder: Saundaryalaharī
Shaktism book cover
context information

Shakta (शाक्त, śākta) or Shaktism (śāktism) represents a tradition of Hinduism where the Goddess (Devi) is revered and worshipped. Shakta literature includes a range of scriptures, including various Agamas and Tantras, although its roots may be traced back to the Vedas.

Discover the meaning of kanyadana in the context of Shaktism from relevant books on Exotic India

Purana and Itihasa (epic history)

Kanyadana in Purana glossary... « previous · [K] · next »

Kanyādāna (कन्यादान) refers to “giving of the daughter away, in marriage”.—The Śivapurāṇa says that Himavat in the company of Menā gave his daughter Pārvatī to Śiva in marriage (Rudrasaṃhitā, Chapter 48) Also in the Girijākalyāṇamahāprabandham (in Kannaḍa) the poet Harihara writes that Himālaya in the company of his lawful wife Menādevī performed the kanyādāna. According to some traditions Viṣṇu would have played the role of Pārvatī’s brother and done the kanyādāna.

Source: Archaeological Survey of India: Śaiva monuments at Paṭṭadakal (purāṇa)
Purana book cover
context information

The Purana (पुराण, purāṇas) refers to Sanskrit literature preserving ancient India’s vast cultural history, including historical legends, religious ceremonies, various arts and sciences. The eighteen mahapuranas total over 400,000 shlokas (metrical couplets) and date to at least several centuries BCE.

Discover the meaning of kanyadana in the context of Purana from relevant books on Exotic India

Languages of India and abroad

Marathi-English dictionary

Kanyadana in Marathi glossary... « previous · [K] · next »

kanyādāna (कन्यादान) [or कन्याप्रदान, kanyāpradāna].—(S) Giving a daughter in marriage.

Source: DDSA: The Molesworth Marathi and English Dictionary

kanyādāna (कन्यादान) [-pradāna, -प्रदान].—n Giving a daughter in marriage.

Source: DDSA: The Aryabhusan school dictionary, Marathi-English
context information

Marathi is an Indo-European language having over 70 million native speakers people in (predominantly) Maharashtra India. Marathi, like many other Indo-Aryan languages, evolved from early forms of Prakrit, which itself is a subset of Sanskrit, one of the most ancient languages of the world.

Discover the meaning of kanyadana in the context of Marathi from relevant books on Exotic India

Sanskrit-English dictionary

Kanyadana in Sanskrit glossary... « previous · [K] · next »

Kanyādāna (कन्यादान).—giving away a girl in marriage; अद्भिरेव द्विजाग्र्याणां कन्यादानं विशिष्यते (adbhireva dvijāgryāṇāṃ kanyādānaṃ viśiṣyate) Ms.3.35.

Derivable forms: kanyādānam (कन्यादानम्).

Kanyādāna is a Sanskrit compound consisting of the terms kanyā and dāna (दान).

Source: DDSA: The practical Sanskrit-English dictionary
context information

Sanskrit, also spelled संस्कृतम् (saṃskṛtam), is an ancient language of India commonly seen as the grandmother of the Indo-European language family. Closely allied with Prakrit and Pali, Sanskrit is more exhaustive in both grammar and terms and has the most extensive collection of literature in the world, greatly surpassing its sister-languages Greek and Latin.

Discover the meaning of kanyadana in the context of Sanskrit from relevant books on Exotic India

Relevant definitions

Search found 554 related definition(s) that might help you understand this better. Below you will find the 15 most relevant articles:

Dana
Dāna (दान, “donation”) forms part of the ancient Indian education system, which aimed at both t...
Kanya
Kanyā (कन्या) is the name of a sacred river as mentioned in the Śivapurāṇa 1.12, “somehow men m...
Danashila
Dānaśīla (दानशील).—a. exceedingly liberal or munificent; निर्गुणोऽपि विमुखो न भूपतेर्दानशौण्डमन...
Varadana
Varadāna (वरदान).—A holy place near Dvārakā. It was here that Durvāsas gave Bhagavān Śrī Kṛṣṇa ...
Kanyakubja
Kanyākubja (कन्याकुब्ज) is the name of an ancient city, according to the Kathāsaritsāgara, chap...
Godana
Godāna (गोदान).—In ancient India it was believed to be a very great deed of moral merit to give...
Mahadana
Mahādāna.—(EI 7, 16; CII 4); a great gift, 16 of which are enumerated in the Purāṇas (see Hist....
Dharmadana
Dharmadāna (धर्मदान) refers to “generosity of the Dharma” and represents one of the three kinds...
Adeyadana
Adeyadāna (अदेयदान).—n. (-naṃ) Giving what ought not to be given, what is not one’s own, &c...
Danapatra
Dānapatra (दानपत्र).—a deed of gifts. Derivable forms: dānapatram (दानपत्रम्).Dānapatra is a Sa...
Nityadana
Nityadāna (नित्यदान).—ind. Always, constantly, and eternally. E. nitya, and dāc aff.--- OR --- ...
Danapati
Dānapati (दानपति, “patron”) is of two kinds (rich and poor), according to the 2nd century Mahāp...
Kanyakumari
Kanyākumārī (कन्याकुमारी).—(KANYAKŪPA; KANYĀTĪRTHA) General information. Mahābhārata makes refe...
Danaparamita
Dānapāramitā (दानपारमिता).—perfection of liberality. Dānapāramitā is a Sanskrit compound consis...
Amisadana
Āmiṣadāna (आमिषदान) refers to “material generosity”, according to the 2nd century Mahāprajñāpār...

Relevant text

Like what you read? Consider supporting this website: