Kanika, Kaṇika, Kanīka: 14 definitions

Introduction

Introduction:

Kanika means something in Buddhism, Pali, Hinduism, Sanskrit, the history of ancient India, Marathi. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

In Hinduism

Purana and Itihasa (epic history)

Source: archive.org: Puranic Encyclopedia

1) Kaṇika (कणिक).—General information. One of the ministers of Dhṛtarāṣṭra. He was a brahmin well-learned in Kūṭanīti (Diplomacy). The bad advice he gave to Dhṛtarāṣṭra became well-known as "Kaṇika’s Kūṭanīti". (See full article at Story of Kaṇika from the Puranic encyclopaedia by Vettam Mani)

2) Kaṇika (कणिक).—There is a statement in Mahābhārata about another brahmin of the Bharadvāja family who was also well-versed in Kūṭanīti. He was an adviser to Śatruñjaya, King of Sauvīra. (Chapter 140, Śānti Parva).

Source: GRETIL e-library: Prologomena to the critical edition of the Ādiparva

Kaṇika (कणिक) is a variant spelling for  Kaṇiṅka (often mis-written Kaniṅka, Kaliṅka).—Kaṇiṅka, which is the Southern equivalent of Kaṇika, the reference being, no doubt, to the minister or statesman (mantrin) Kaṇika (named after the famous authority Kaṇika or Kaṇiṅka cited in the Arthaśāstra of Kauṭilya), who appears only once in the epic, and that expressly for the purpose of expounding his political philosophy to the Kauravas.

Purana book cover
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The Purana (पुराण, purāṇas) refers to Sanskrit literature preserving ancient India’s vast cultural history, including historical legends, religious ceremonies, various arts and sciences. The eighteen mahapuranas total over 400,000 shlokas (metrical couplets) and date to at least several centuries BCE.

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Vaishnavism (Vaishava dharma)

Source: ISKCON Press: Glossary

Kaṇika (कणिक).—A brāhmaṇa minister of King Dhṛtarāṣṭra. He advised the King to kill his enemies by any means. (Ādi Parva in Mahābhārata)

Vaishnavism book cover
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Vaishnava (वैष्णव, vaiṣṇava) or vaishnavism (vaiṣṇavism) represents a tradition of Hinduism worshipping Vishnu as the supreme Lord. Similar to the Shaktism and Shaivism traditions, Vaishnavism also developed as an individual movement, famous for its exposition of the dashavatara (‘ten avatars of Vishnu’).

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General definition (in Hinduism)

Source: WikiPedia: Hinduism

Kanika (कणिक): Minister of Sakuni.

In Buddhism

General definition (in Buddhism)

Source: academia.edu: The Chronological History of Buddhism

Taranatha records that King Kanika ascended the throne of Malava in the west at a young age. He became extremely rich by discovering 28 mines of diamonds (probably, Panna mines of Madhaya Pradesh). King Kanika invites Matricheta to visit his kingdom but being unable on account of his great age to come, Matricheta writes a letter known as “Maharaja-Kanika-Lekha”. King Kanika accepts Buddhism after receiving this letter from Matricheta. Taranatha clearly tells us that King Kanika should not be identified with King Kanishka. Evidently, King Kanika was the king of Malava and a young contemporary of Matricheta.

India history and geogprahy

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Indian Epigraphical Glossary

Kānika.—(IE 8-5), Tamil; also spelt kānuka; same as kāṇika. (EI 33), also called kānikĕ or kānikĕ-kappa in Kannaḍa; tolls. Note: kānika is defined in the “Indian epigraphical glossary” as it can be found on ancient inscriptions commonly written in Sanskrit, Prakrit or Dravidian languages.

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Kāṇika.—(IE 8-5), same as Kannaḍa kāṇika-kānĕ, kāṇikĕ- kappa or kappa-kānikĕ, ‘presents from an inferior to a superior’, etc. Note: kāṇika is defined in the “Indian epigraphical glossary” as it can be found on ancient inscriptions commonly written in Sanskrit, Prakrit or Dravidian languages.

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Kānika.—Kannaḍa; also called kāṇika-kanĕ. Note: kānika is defined in the “Indian epigraphical glossary” as it can be found on ancient inscriptions commonly written in Sanskrit, Prakrit or Dravidian languages.

India history book cover
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The history of India traces the identification of countries, villages, towns and other regions of India, as well as royal dynasties, rulers, tribes, local festivities and traditions and regional languages. Ancient India enjoyed religious freedom and encourages the path of Dharma, a concept common to Buddhism, Hinduism, and Jainism.

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Languages of India and abroad

Pali-English dictionary

Source: Sutta: The Pali Text Society's Pali-English Dictionary

Kaṇikā, (f.) (cp. kaṇa) 1. a small particle of broken rice (opp. taṇḍula a full grain) J. VI, 341, 366 (°āhi pūvaṃ pacitvā). 2. a small spot, a freckle, mole, in (adj.) having no moles D. I, 80, and sa° with moles D. I. 80 (cp. DA. I, 223). (Page 178)

Pali book cover
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Pali is the language of the Tipiṭaka, which is the sacred canon of Theravāda Buddhism and contains much of the Buddha’s speech. Closeley related to Sanskrit, both languages are used interchangeably between religions.

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Marathi-English dictionary

Source: DDSA: The Molesworth Marathi and English Dictionary

kaṇikā (कणिका).—f S A small particle gen.: also a granule, as ghṛtakaṇikā, madhukaṇikā, śarkarākaṇikā.

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kaṇīka (कणीक).—f ē (kaṇa S) Wheaten flour, whether fine flour or meal. kaṇīka timbaṇēṃ g. of o. (To knead the flour of; to make dough of.) To beat well; to pommel into a mummy. Also kaṇakīsārakhā timbaṇēṃ. kaṇakēcā garā Fine wheaten flour.

Source: DDSA: The Aryabhusan school dictionary, Marathi-English

kaṇīka (कणीक).—f Wheaten flour. kaṇīka timbaṇēṃ To beat well, to pommel into mummy.

context information

Marathi is an Indo-European language having over 70 million native speakers people in (predominantly) Maharashtra India. Marathi, like many other Indo-Aryan languages, evolved from early forms of Prakrit, which itself is a subset of Sanskrit, one of the most ancient languages of the world.

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Sanskrit dictionary

Source: DDSA: The practical Sanskrit-English dictionary

Kaṇika (कणिक) or Kaṇīka (कणीक).—1 A grain.

2) A small particle.

3) An ear of corn.

4) A meal of parched wheat.

5) An enemy.

6) Name of a purificatory ceremony, i. e. waving round lamps at sacrificial rites.

7) An enemy.

-kā 1 An atom, a small or minute particle; यथाऽ- श्वत्थकणीकायामन्तर्भूतो महाद्रुमः (yathā'- śvatthakaṇīkāyāmantarbhūto mahādrumaḥ) Mb.12.211.2.

2) A drop (of water); तामुत्थाप्य स्वजलकणिकाशीतलेनानिलेन (tāmutthāpya svajalakaṇikāśītalenānilena) Me.98.

3) A kind of corn or rice.

4) Cumin seed.

5) The अग्निमन्थ (agnimantha) tree (Mar. naravela).

Derivable forms: kaṇikaḥ (कणिकः), kaṇīkaḥ (कणीकः).

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Kaṇīka (कणीक).—a. Small, diminutive.

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Kanīka (कनीक).—a. See. कणीक (kaṇīka).

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Shabda-Sagara Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Kaṇika (कणिक).—m.

(-kaḥ) 1. A small particle, as a crystal, an eye of corn, &c. 2. An enemy. 3. Whirling round a set of lamps at sacrificial ceremonies. 4. The heart of wheat, commonly Suji, sharps or semoule. f.

(-kā) 1. An atom, a small particle. 2. Small, minute: see kaṇa. 3. A plant, (Premna spinosa:) see gaṇikārikā 4. A kind of rice. E. kaṇa small, vun affix, and iṭ inserted, fem. affix ṭāp.

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Kaṇīka (कणीक).—mfn.

(-kaḥ-kā-kaṃ) Small, diminutive. E. kaṇa to be small, īkan Unadi affix; it is also written kanīka and kaṇika.

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Kanīka (कनीक).—mfn.

(-kaḥ-kā-kaṃ) Very small: see kaṇika.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Benfey Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Kaṇika (कणिक).—i. e. kaṇa + ika, I. m. 1. Seed, [Bhāgavata-Purāṇa, (ed. Burnouf.)] 7, 9, 33. 2. A proper name, Mahābhārata 1, 5544. Ii. f. , A drop, [Meghadūta, (ed. Gildemeister.)] 96.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Cappeller Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Kaṇika (कणिक).—[masculine] = kaṇa.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Monier-Williams Sanskrit-English Dictionary

1) Kaṇika (कणिक):—[from kaṇ] m. a grain, ear of corn

2) [v.s. ...] a drop, small particle, [Varāha-mihira’s Bṛhat-saṃhitā]

3) [v.s. ...] the meal of parched wheat, the heart of wheat, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

4) [v.s. ...] an enemy, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

5) [v.s. ...] a purificatory ceremony (= nīrājana q.v.), [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

6) [v.s. ...] Name of a minister of king Dhṛta-rāṣṭra, [Mahābhārata i]

7) Kaṇikā (कणिका):—[from kaṇika > kaṇ] f. an ear of corn [commentator or commentary] on [Bhāgavata-purāṇa]

8) [v.s. ...] a drop, atom, small particle, [Prabodha-candrodaya; Meghadūta] etc.

9) [v.s. ...] a small spot, [Kādambarī]

10) [v.s. ...] the meal of parched wheat

11) [v.s. ...] Premna Spinosa or Longifolia, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

12) [v.s. ...] a kind of corn, [Pañcadaṇḍacchattra-prabandha]

13) Kaṇīka (कणीक):—[from kaṇ] mfn. small, diminutive, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

14) Kaṇīkā (कणीका):—[from kaṇīka > kaṇ] f. a grain, single seed, [Mahābhārata xii.]

context information

Sanskrit, also spelled संस्कृतम् (saṃskṛtam), is an ancient language of India commonly seen as the grandmother of the Indo-European language family (even English!). Closely allied with Prakrit and Pali, Sanskrit is more exhaustive in both grammar and terms and has the most extensive collection of literature in the world, greatly surpassing its sister-languages Greek and Latin.

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