Kandara, Kandarā, Kaṇḍarā, Kamdara: 27 definitions

Introduction:

Kandara means something in Hinduism, Sanskrit, Buddhism, Pali, the history of ancient India, Marathi, Jainism, Prakrit, Hindi, biology. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

In Hinduism

Purana and Itihasa (epic history)

Source: archive.org: Shiva Purana - English Translation

Kandara (कन्दर) refers to “caves”, and is used to describe the mountain Kailāsa (the auspicious excellent mountainous abode of Śiva), according to the Śivapurāṇa 2.2.40.—Accordingly, as Brahmā narrated to Nārada:—“[...] accompanied by the gods, sages, Brahmā and others Viṣṇu went to Kailāsa, the auspicious excellent mountainous abode of Śiva. [...] Many kinds of deer roamed and many kinds of birds hovered there. The celestial and Siddha damsels sported about in different springs and pools along with their husbands and lovers. It contained many caves (i.e., kandara) and ridges. It shone with various kinds of trees and had a silver lustre”.

Source: archive.org: Puranic Encyclopedia

Kandarā (कन्दरा).—A follower of Skandadeva. (Chapter 46, Śalya Parva).

Source: JatLand: List of Mahabharata people and places

Kandarā (कन्दरा) refers to the name of a Lady mentioned in the Mahābhārata (cf. IX.45.9). Note: The Mahābhārata (mentioning Kandarā) is a Sanskrit epic poem consisting of 100,000 ślokas (metrical verses) and is over 2000 years old.

Kaṇḍarā also refers to the name of a Lady mentioned in the Mahābhārata (cf. IX.45.15).

Purana book cover
context information

The Purana (पुराण, purāṇas) refers to Sanskrit literature preserving ancient India’s vast cultural history, including historical legends, religious ceremonies, various arts and sciences. The eighteen mahapuranas total over 400,000 shlokas (metrical couplets) and date to at least several centuries BCE.

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Ayurveda (science of life)

Source: Wisdom Library: Raj Nighantu

Kandara (कन्दर) or Kandarā refers to a “cave” according to the second chapter (dharaṇyādi-varga) of the 13th-century Raj Nighantu or Rājanighaṇṭu (an Ayurvedic encyclopedia). The Dharaṇyādi-varga covers the lands, soil, mountains [viz., Kandara], jungles and vegetation’s relations between trees and plants and substances, with their various kinds.

Source: Wisdom Library: Āyurveda and botany

Kaṇḍarā (कण्डरा) is a Sanskrit terchnical term referring to “tendons” (tough bands of tissue that connects muscles to bones) and is used throughout Ayurvedic literature such as the Carakasaṃhitā and the Suśrutasaṃhita.

Source: Wisdom Library: Local Names of Plants and Drugs

Kandara in the Hindi language is the name of a plant identified with Echinops cornigerus DC. from the Asteraceae (Sunflower) family having the following synonyms: Echinops coriarius, Echinops polygraphus. For the possible medicinal usage of kandara, you can check this page for potential sources and references, although be aware that any some or none of the side-effects may not be mentioned here, wether they be harmful or beneficial to health.

Kandara in the Urdu language is the name of a plant identified with Cornus macrophylla Wall. from the Cornaceae (Dogwood) family having the following synonyms: Cornus brachypoda, Swida macrophylla.

Ayurveda book cover
context information

Āyurveda (आयुर्वेद, ayurveda) is a branch of Indian science dealing with medicine, herbalism, taxology, anatomy, surgery, alchemy and related topics. Traditional practice of Āyurveda in ancient India dates back to at least the first millenium BC. Literature is commonly written in Sanskrit using various poetic metres.

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Shaktism (Shakta philosophy)

Source: Google Books: Manthanabhairavatantram

1) Kandara (कन्दर) refers to the “abyss”, according to the Manthānabhairavatantra, a vast sprawling work that belongs to a corpus of Tantric texts concerned with the worship of the goddess Kubjikā.—Accordingly, “Above [Śiva] is the tranquil (energy called) Śivā. Subtle, she is (the goddess) Vakrikā of the Abyss (kandara) (of the Void) in the supreme (state). O Kujeśvara, the glory (śrī) within that is the glory of liberation. The (blissful) vibration of the Command (ājñāghūrmi) is (thus) attained in the (supreme) faultless and indubitable (reality). If he desires liberation, the one who possesses (this) glory (śrīmat) should abide on that plane.[...]”.

2) Kandara (कन्दर) refers to a “ravine (of a mountain)”, according to the Jayadrathayāmala verse 4.35.18-21.—Accordingly, while describing Nityā Kālī: “Thus she is always arousing and very fierce. Recollect her residing in a mountain ravine (parvata-kandara-sthā). [...] She is the firestick of Passion and the family of mantras. She is Saṃkledinī whose form is Kālī and is very fierce”.

Shaktism book cover
context information

Shakta (शाक्त, śākta) or Shaktism (śāktism) represents a tradition of Hinduism where the Goddess (Devi) is revered and worshipped. Shakta literature includes a range of scriptures, including various Agamas and Tantras, although its roots may be traced back to the Vedas.

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Jyotisha (astronomy and astrology)

Source: Wisdom Library: Brihat Samhita by Varahamihira

Kandara (कन्दर) refers to “outer caves”, according to the Bṛhatsaṃhitā (chapter 16) (“On the planets—graha-bhaktiyoga”), an encyclopedic Sanskrit work written by Varāhamihira mainly focusing on the science of ancient Indian astronomy astronomy (Jyotiṣa).—Accordingly, “Rāhu presides over hill men, mountain peaks, outer (kandara) and inner caves, the Mlecchas, the Śūdras, persons subsisting on dogs and jackals, spear men, the countries of Vokkaṇa and Aśvamukha and persons physically deformed. [...]”.

Jyotisha book cover
context information

Jyotisha (ज्योतिष, jyotiṣa or jyotish) refers to ‘astronomy’ or “Vedic astrology” and represents the fifth of the six Vedangas (additional sciences to be studied along with the Vedas). Jyotisha concerns itself with the study and prediction of the movements of celestial bodies, in order to calculate the auspicious time for rituals and ceremonies.

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India history and geography

Source: archive.org: Ceylon Branch of the Royal Asiatic Society 1963

Kandara or Kaṇḍanagara is the name of an ancient locality in the Polonnaruva (Polonnaruwa) district of Ceylon (Sri Lanka).—After the capture of Vijitanagara, Duṭṭhagāmaṇi advanced to Girilaka, also called Girinil-nuvara and Girinillankada, and fought a successful action there. (Girinelavāhanaka-vihāra, to the north of Kaṇḍanagara or Kandara, was built by Sūratissa early in 2nd B.C.).

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Indian Epigraphical Glossary

Kaṇḍāra.—Prakrit; cf. utkṛ, ‘to engrave’. See kaṇḍāraṇa. Note: kaṇḍāra is defined in the “Indian epigraphical glossary” as it can be found on ancient inscriptions commonly written in Sanskrit, Prakrit or Dravidian languages.

India history book cover
context information

The history of India traces the identification of countries, villages, towns and other regions of India, as well as mythology, zoology, royal dynasties, rulers, tribes, local festivities and traditions and regional languages. Ancient India enjoyed religious freedom and encourages the path of Dharma, a concept common to Buddhism, Hinduism, and Jainism.

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Biology (plants and animals)

Source: Google Books: CRC World Dictionary (Regional names)

1) Kandara in India is the name of a plant defined with Cirsium verutum in various botanical sources. This page contains potential references in Ayurveda, modern medicine, and other folk traditions or local practices It has the synonym Cnicus verutus D. Don (among others).

2) Kandara is also identified with Zingiber officinale It has the synonym Amomum angustifolium Salisb., nom. illeg. (etc.).

Example references for further research on medicinal uses or toxicity (see latin names for full list):

· Bull. Bot. Survey India (1972)
· Verhandelingen van het bataviaasch genootschap van kunsten en wetenschappen (1790)
· Zingiberoideae.
· Species Plantarum (1753)
· Cytologia (1985)
· Bull. Sichuan Sch. Chinese Mater. Med. (1987)

If you are looking for specific details regarding Kandara, for example health benefits, extract dosage, chemical composition, pregnancy safety, side effects, diet and recipes, have a look at these references.

Biology book cover
context information

This sections includes definitions from the five kingdoms of living things: Animals, Plants, Fungi, Protists and Monera. It will include both the official binomial nomenclature (scientific names usually in Latin) as well as regional spellings and variants.

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Languages of India and abroad

Pali-English dictionary

[«previous next»] — Kandara in Pali glossary
Source: BuddhaSasana: Concise Pali-English Dictionary

kaṇḍarā : (f.) tendon.

-- or --

kandara : (m.) a grotto on the slope of a mountain. || kandarā (f.), a grotto on the slope of a mountain.

Source: Sutta: The Pali Text Society's Pali-English Dictionary

Kaṇḍarā, (f.) sinew, tendon Vin. I, 91, 322 (in cpd. kaṇḍara-cchinna one whose tendons (of the feet) have been cut); Kvu 23, 31; Vism. 253, 254 (where KhA 49 reads miñja). (Page 179)

— or —

Kandara, (Sk. kandara) — 1. a cave, grotto, generally, on the slope or at the foot of a mountain Vin. II, 76, 146; used as a dwelling-place Th. 1, 602; J. I, 205; III, 172. ‹-› 2. a glen, defile, gully D. I, 71=A. II, 210=Pug. 59; A. IV, 437; Miln. 36; explained at DA. I, 209 (as a mountainous part broken by the water of a river; the etym. is a popular one, viz. “kaṃ vuccati udakaṃ; tena dāritaṃ”). k-padarasākhā A. I, 243=II. 240; PvA. 29. (Page 186)

Pali book cover
context information

Pali is the language of the Tipiṭaka, which is the sacred canon of Theravāda Buddhism and contains much of the Buddha’s speech. Closeley related to Sanskrit, both languages are used interchangeably between religions.

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Marathi-English dictionary

Source: DDSA: The Molesworth Marathi and English Dictionary

kandarā (कंदरा).—f S A cave (artificial or natural).

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kāṇḍāra (कांडार).—f kāṇḍārē n A venomous species of serpent.

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kāṇḍārā (कांडारा).—m (kāṇḍa) A division across the length (as of a bamboo, sugarcane, plantain-stem, or similar small trunk). 2 (kāṇḍaṇēṃ) Chaff separated from corn by pounding.

Source: DDSA: The Aryabhusan school dictionary, Marathi-English

kandarā (कंदरा).—f A cave.

context information

Marathi is an Indo-European language having over 70 million native speakers people in (predominantly) Maharashtra India. Marathi, like many other Indo-Aryan languages, evolved from early forms of Prakrit, which itself is a subset of Sanskrit, one of the most ancient languages of the world.

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Sanskrit dictionary

Source: DDSA: The practical Sanskrit-English dictionary

Kaṇḍarā (कण्डरा).—

1) A sinew (of which 16 are considered to be in the human body).

2) A principal vessel of the body, a large artery, vein &c.

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Kandara (कन्दर).—A cave, a valley; नगमिव चारुकन्दरम् (nagamiva cārukandaram) (abhigamya) Rām.5.7.15; किं कन्दाः कन्दरेभ्यः प्रलयमुपगताः (kiṃ kandāḥ kandarebhyaḥ pralayamupagatāḥ) Bhartṛhari 3.69; वसुधाधरकन्दराभिसर्पी (vasudhādharakandarābhisarpī) V.1.18; Meghadūta 58.

-raḥ A hook for driving an elephant.

-rā, -rī A cave, valley, hollow.

-ram Dry ginger.

Derivable forms: kandaraḥ (कन्दरः), kandaram (कन्दरम्).

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Kāṇḍāra (काण्डार).—A kind of mixed caste.

Derivable forms: kāṇḍāraḥ (काण्डारः).

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Shabda-Sagara Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Kaṇḍarā (कण्डरा).—f.

(-rā) A principal vessel of the body, a large artery, vein, &c. E. kaḍi to divide, aran aff.

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Kandara (कन्दर).—mfn.

(-raḥ-rā or -rī-raṃ) 1. An artificial or natural cave. 2. A glen, a defile, a valley. m.

(-raḥ) A hook for driving an elephant with. n.

(-raṃ) Dry ginger. E. kaṃ water or the head, and dṛ to divide, to pierce, ap aff.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Benfey Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Kandara (कन्दर).— (probably ka + m, old nom. and acc. n. of kim, -dṛ10 + a), m., f. ṛ10, and n. A cave, [Pañcatantra] 93, 8.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Cappeller Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Kandara (कन्दर).—[neuter] cave, glen.

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Kāṇḍāra (काण्डार).—[masculine] a cert. mixed caste.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Monier-Williams Sanskrit-English Dictionary

1) Kaṇḍarā (कण्डरा):—[from kaṇḍ] f. a sinew (of which sixteen are considered to be in the human body), [Suśruta; Bhāvaprakāśa] etc.

2) [v.s. ...] a principal vessel of the body, a large artery, vein etc., [Horace H. Wilson]

3) Kandara (कन्दर):—f(ā) , am, n. (as, m., [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]) (√kand [commentator or commentary] on [Uṇādi-sūtra iii, 131]; kaṃ, jalena dīryate, [Tārānātha tarkavācaspati’s Vācaspatyam, Sanskrit dictionary]), ‘great cliff’, an artificial or natural cave, glen, defile, valley, [Rāmāyaṇa; Pañcatantra; Meghadūta] etc.

4) m. a hook for driving an elephant, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

5) Kandarā (कन्दरा):—[from kandara] f. the lute of the Caṇḍālas, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

6) [v.s. ...] Name of a mother in the retinue of Skanda, [Mahābhārata; Bhāgavata-purāṇa]

7) Kandara (कन्दर):—n. ginger, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

8) Kāṇḍāra (काण्डार):—[from kāṇḍa] m. a kind of mixed caste, [Brahma-purāṇa]

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Yates Sanskrit-English Dictionary

1) Kaṇḍarā (कण्डरा):—(rā) 1. f. A principal vessel of the body, a large artery or vein.

2) Kandara (कन्दर):—[(raḥ-rā-rī-raṃ)] 1. m. f. n. 3. f. An artificial or natural cave; a defile. m. Elephant hook. n. Dry ginger.

Source: DDSA: Paia-sadda-mahannavo; a comprehensive Prakrit Hindi dictionary (S)

Kandarā (कन्दरा) in the Sanskrit language is related to the Prakrit words: Aṃdarā, Kaṃdara, Kaṃdarā, Kaṃdīra, Kaṃdharā.

[Sanskrit to German]

Kandara in German

context information

Sanskrit, also spelled संस्कृतम् (saṃskṛtam), is an ancient language of India commonly seen as the grandmother of the Indo-European language family (even English!). Closely allied with Prakrit and Pali, Sanskrit is more exhaustive in both grammar and terms and has the most extensive collection of literature in the world, greatly surpassing its sister-languages Greek and Latin.

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Hindi dictionary

[«previous next»] — Kandara in Hindi glossary
Source: DDSA: A practical Hindi-English dictionary

1) Kandara in Hindi refers in English to:—(nm) a tendon..—kandara (कंडरा) is alternatively transliterated as Kaṃḍarā.

2) Kandara in Hindi refers in English to:—(nf) a cave, cavern..—kandara (कंदरा) is alternatively transliterated as Kaṃdarā.

context information

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Prakrit-English dictionary

Source: DDSA: Paia-sadda-mahannavo; a comprehensive Prakrit Hindi dictionary

1) Kaṃḍāra (कंडार) in the Prakrit language is related to the Sanskrit word: Utkṛ.

2) Kaṃdara (कंदर) also relates to the Sanskrit word: Kandara.

3) Kaṃdarā (कंदरा) also relates to the Sanskrit word: Kandarā.

Kaṃdarā has the following synonyms: Kaṃdīra.

context information

Prakrit is an ancient language closely associated with both Pali and Sanskrit. Jain literature is often composed in this language or sub-dialects, such as the Agamas and their commentaries which are written in Ardhamagadhi and Maharashtri Prakrit. The earliest extant texts can be dated to as early as the 4th century BCE although core portions might be older.

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Kannada-English dictionary

Source: Alar: Kannada-English corpus

Kaṃdara (ಕಂದರ):—[noun] that part of a human or animal joining the head to the body; the neck.

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Kaṃdara (ಕಂದರ):—

1) [noun] a stretch of low land lying between hills or mountains; a valley.

2) [noun] a hollow place inside the earth, usu. an opening, as in a hillside, extending back horizontally; a cave.

3) [noun] a deep, narrow pass between steep heights; a gorge.

4) [noun] an elephant driveṛs hook to urge and control it.

5) [noun] the dried aromatic rhizome of Zingiber officinale of Zingeraceae family, used as a spice or perfume and in medicine.

context information

Kannada is a Dravidian language (as opposed to the Indo-European language family) mainly spoken in the southwestern region of India.

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