Kancana, Kañcana, Kāñcana, Kamcana: 32 definitions

Introduction:

Kancana means something in Buddhism, Pali, Hinduism, Sanskrit, Jainism, Prakrit, the history of ancient India, Marathi, biology. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

Alternative spellings of this word include Kanchana.

In Hinduism

Purana and Itihasa (epic history)

Source: Wisdom Library: Bhagavata Purana

Kāñcana (काञ्चन):—Son of Bhīma (son of Vijaya, one of sons of Purūravā). He had a son named Hotraka. (see Bhāgavata Purāṇa 9.15.2-3)

Source: archive.org: Puranic Encyclopedia

1) Kāñcana (काञ्चन).—One of the two warriors given to Skandadeva by Mahāmeru. The other warrior was named Meghamālī. (Mahābhārata Śalya Parva, Chapter 45, Verse 47).

2) Kāñcana (काञ्चन).—A King of the Pūru dynasty. See under the word PŪRUVAṂŚA.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: The Purana Index

1a) Kāñcana (काञ्चन).—The son of Bhīma, and father of Hotraka (Suhotra, Viṣṇu-purāṇa).*

  • * Bhāgavata-purāṇa IX. 15. 3; Viṣṇu-purāṇa IV. 7. 3.

1b) An Yakṣa.*

  • * Vāyu-purāṇa 69. 12.
Source: JatLand: List of Mahabharata people and places

Kañcana (कञ्चन) is a name mentioned in the Mahābhārata (cf. II.48.26, V.19.15, IX.44.43) and represents one of the many proper names used for people and places. Note: The Mahābhārata (mentioning Kañcana) is a Sanskrit epic poem consisting of 100,000 ślokas (metrical verses) and is over 2000 years old.

Purana book cover
context information

The Purana (पुराण, purāṇas) refers to Sanskrit literature preserving ancient India’s vast cultural history, including historical legends, religious ceremonies, various arts and sciences. The eighteen mahapuranas total over 400,000 shlokas (metrical couplets) and date to at least several centuries BCE.

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Ayurveda (science of life)

Source: Wisdom Library: Āyurveda and botany

1) Kāñcana (काञ्चन) is another name (synonym) for Kampillaka, which is the Sanskrit word for Mallotus philippensis (kamala tree), a plant from the Cleomaceae family. This synonym was identified by Narahari in his 13th-century Rājanighaṇṭu (verse 13.99), which is an Ayurvedic medicinal thesaurus.

2) Kāñcana (काञ्चन) is another name (synonym) for Karbudāra, which is the Sanskrit word for Bauhinia variegata (orchid tree), a plant from the Cleomaceae family. This synonym was identified by Narahari in his 13th-century Rājanighaṇṭu (verse 13.99), which is an Ayurvedic medicinal thesaurus.

Ayurveda book cover
context information

Āyurveda (आयुर्वेद, ayurveda) is a branch of Indian science dealing with medicine, herbalism, taxology, anatomy, surgery, alchemy and related topics. Traditional practice of Āyurveda in ancient India dates back to at least the first millenium BC. Literature is commonly written in Sanskrit using various poetic metres.

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Chandas (prosody, study of Sanskrit metres)

Source: Shodhganga: a concise history of Sanskrit Chanda literature

Kāñcana (काञ्चन) is the name of a Sanskrit metre (chandas) to which Hemacandra (1088-1173 C.E.) assigned the alternative name of Kalyāṇa in his auto-commentary on the second chapter of the Chandonuśāsana. Hemacandra gives these alternative names for the metres by other authorities (like Bharata), even though the number of gaṇas or letters do not differ.

Chandas book cover
context information

Chandas (छन्दस्) refers to Sanskrit prosody and represents one of the six Vedangas (auxiliary disciplines belonging to the study of the Vedas). The science of prosody (chandas-shastra) focusses on the study of the poetic meters such as the commonly known twenty-six metres mentioned by Pingalas.

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Shaktism (Shakta philosophy)

Source: Google Books: Manthanabhairavatantram

1) Kāñcana (काञ्चन) refers to “gold”, according to the Ṣaṭsāhasrasaṃhitā, an expansion of the Kubjikāmatatantra: the earliest popular and most authoritative Tantra of the Kubjikā cult.—(Cf. Gahvarāntasthā)—Accordingly, “[...] The divine Transmission (krama) should be told (to such a one,) not to (just anybody) one likes. O goddess, one should tell this, in the proper manner, to one for whom pleasure and pain, gold [i.e., kāñcana] and iron [i.e., loṣṭa], friend and foe, nectar and poison are the same and, reflecting on the Transmission, observes all the rules of the renouncer. The liberated Kaula (avadhūta) is the best, middling is the householder and the least is the renouncer (naiṣṭhika). This should be told to one who is fit out of all these three; (and) not to any other: this is the Command in the Kula teaching”.

2) Kāñcana (काञ्चन) refers to one of the thirty-six sacred trees, according to the Ṣaṭsāhasrasaṃhitā.—Accordingly, “According to the Kula teaching (these) [i.e., Kāñcana] are the most excellent Kula trees that give accomplishments and liberation. (They are full of) Yoginīs, Siddhas, Lords of the Heroes and hosts of gods and demons. [...]”.

Shaktism book cover
context information

Shakta (शाक्त, śākta) or Shaktism (śāktism) represents a tradition of Hinduism where the Goddess (Devi) is revered and worshipped. Shakta literature includes a range of scriptures, including various Agamas and Tantras, although its roots may be traced back to the Vedas.

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Shaivism (Shaiva philosophy)

Source: Brill: Śaivism and the Tantric Traditions

Kāñcana (काञ्चन) refers to “gold”, according to the Kiraṇatantra chapter 49 (dealing with vratacaryā).—Accordingly, “Garuḍa spoke: ‘You have taught me, O great Lord, the activities of the Neophyte, the Putraka and the Ācārya. Tell me those of the Sādhaka’. The Lord spoke: ‘The excellent Sādhaka [should be] full of sattva, firm, capable of endurance, his mind fixed on [his] mantra, unassailable, of great wisdom, looking impartially (sama) on mud (loṣṭa), stones (aśma) and gold (kāñcana) engaged, regular in [the performance of] oblations, always devoted to recitation and meditation, dexterous in the dispelling of obstacles, firm in [the practice of his] religious observance, calm, pure. [...]’”.

Shaivism book cover
context information

Shaiva (शैव, śaiva) or Shaivism (śaivism) represents a tradition of Hinduism worshiping Shiva as the supreme being. Closely related to Shaktism, Shaiva literature includes a range of scriptures, including Tantras, while the root of this tradition may be traced back to the ancient Vedas.

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Vastushastra (architecture)

Source: Brill: Śaivism and the Tantric Traditions (architecture)

Kāñcana (काञ्चन) refers to “pieces of silver or gold”, according to the Devyāmata (in the section śalyoddhāra-paṭala or “excavation of extraneous substances”).—Accordingly, “[...] If a cow [which has entered the site] urinates or drops dung, there are pieces of silver or gold (kāñcana) [beneath the site, respectively]. If a cat urinates or drops dung, [the officiant] should prognosticate a piece of iron or an inauspicious thing (? aśam) [beneath the site,] respectively”.

Vastushastra book cover
context information

Vastushastra (वास्तुशास्त्र, vāstuśāstra) refers to the ancient Indian science (shastra) of architecture (vastu), dealing with topics such architecture, sculpture, town-building, fort building and various other constructions. Vastu also deals with the philosophy of the architectural relation with the cosmic universe.

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In Buddhism

Theravada (major branch of Buddhism)

Source: Pali Kanon: Pali Proper Names

1. Kancana - One of the three palaces used by Sumedha Buddha in his last lay life (Bu.xii.19). The Commentary (BuA.163) calls it Konca.

2. Kancana - See Kancanavela.

3. Kancana - See Maha Kancana and Upakancana.

4. Kancana - See Kancanamanava.

context information

Theravāda is a major branch of Buddhism having the the Pali canon (tipitaka) as their canonical literature, which includes the vinaya-pitaka (monastic rules), the sutta-pitaka (Buddhist sermons) and the abhidhamma-pitaka (philosophy and psychology).

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General definition (in Buddhism)

Source: Wisdom Library: Dharma-samgraha

Kāñcana (काञ्चन) refers to the “golden realm” and represents one of the “seven lower regions” (pātāla ) as defined in the Dharma-saṃgraha (section 123). The Dharma-samgraha (Dharmasangraha) is an extensive glossary of Buddhist technical terms in Sanskrit (e.g., kāñcana). The work is attributed to Nagarjuna who lived around the 2nd century A.D.

In Jainism

General definition (in Jainism)

Source: archive.org: Een Kritische Studie Van Svayambhūdeva’s Paümacariu

Kañcana (कञ्चन) participated in the war between Rāma and Rāvaṇa, on the side of the latter, as mentioned in Svayambhūdeva’s Paumacariu (Padmacarita, Paumacariya or Rāmāyaṇapurāṇa) chapter 57ff. Svayambhū or Svayambhūdeva (8th or 9th century) was a Jain householder who probably lived in Karnataka. His work recounts the popular Rāma story as known from the older work Rāmāyaṇa (written by Vālmīki). Various chapters [mentioning Kañcana] are dedicated to the humongous battle whose armies (known as akṣauhiṇīs) consisted of millions of soldiers, horses and elephants, etc.

Source: The University of Sydney: A study of the Twelve Reflections

Kāñcana (काञ्चन) refers to “fire”, according to the 11th century Jñānārṇava, a treatise on Jain Yoga in roughly 2200 Sanskrit verses composed by Śubhacandra.—Accordingly, “Also, as gold (kāñcana) with impurities becomes pure through fire, in like manner this living soul, being heated by the fire of asceticism, [becomes pure]. Astonishingly , external [and] internal asceticism is undergone by honourable mendicants who are wise [and] alarmed by the continuous series of births [in the cycle of rebirth]”.

Synonyms: Svarṇa.

General definition book cover
context information

Jainism is an Indian religion of Dharma whose doctrine revolves around harmlessness (ahimsa) towards every living being. The two major branches (Digambara and Svetambara) of Jainism stimulate self-control (or, shramana, ‘self-reliance’) and spiritual development through a path of peace for the soul to progess to the ultimate goal.

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India history and geography

Source: Ancient Buddhist Texts: Geography of Early Buddhism

Kañcana (कञ्चन) or Kañcanapabbata is the name of a mountain (pabbata) situated in Uttarāpatha (Northern District) of ancient India, as recorded in the Pāli Buddhist texts (detailing the geography of ancient India as it was known in to Early Buddhism).—In the Abbhantara Jātaka we are told that the Kañcana-pabbata is in the Himavanta. From the Nimi Jātaka we know that it is in the Uttara Himavanta.

India history book cover
context information

The history of India traces the identification of countries, villages, towns and other regions of India, as well as royal dynasties, rulers, tribes, local festivities and traditions and regional languages. Ancient India enjoyed religious freedom and encourages the path of Dharma, a concept common to Buddhism, Hinduism, and Jainism.

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Biology (plants and animals)

Source: Google Books: CRC World Dictionary (Regional names)

1) Kancana in India is the name of a plant defined with Michelia champaca in various botanical sources. This page contains potential references in Ayurveda, modern medicine, and other folk traditions or local practices It has the synonym Sampacca suaveolens Kuntze (among others).

2) Kancana is also identified with Toddalia asiatica It has the synonym Aralia labordei H. Lév. (etc.).

Example references for further research on medicinal uses or toxicity (see latin names for full list):

· Systematisches Verzeichniss der im Indischen Archipel (1846)
· Systema Naturae (1817)
· Plantae Asiaticae Rariores, or ‘Descriptions and figures of a select number of unpublished East Indian plants’ (Wallich) (1831)
· Flora Indica (1768)
· Prodromus Systematis Naturalis Regni Vegetabilis (DC.) (1824)
· Bulletin de la Société Botanique de France (1945)

If you are looking for specific details regarding Kancana, for example side effects, extract dosage, chemical composition, diet and recipes, pregnancy safety, health benefits, have a look at these references.

Biology book cover
context information

This sections includes definitions from the five kingdoms of living things: Animals, Plants, Fungi, Protists and Monera. It will include both the official binomial nomenclature (scientific names usually in Latin) as well as regional spellings and variants.

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Languages of India and abroad

Pali-English dictionary

[«previous next»] — Kancana in Pali glossary
Source: BuddhaSasana: Concise Pali-English Dictionary

kañcana : (nt.) gold.

Source: Sutta: The Pali Text Society's Pali-English Dictionary

Kañcana, (nt.) (Derivation uncertain, cp. Sk. kāñeana, either from khacati (shine=the shining metal, cp. kāca (glass) & Sk. kāś), or from kanaka gold, cp. Gr. knhkόs (yellow). P. kañcana is poetical) gold A. III, 346= Th. 1, 691 (muttaṃ selā va k.); Th. 2, 266 (k° ssa phalakaṃ va); VvA. 4, 9 (=jātarūpa). Esp. frequent in cpds. =of or like gold.

Pali book cover
context information

Pali is the language of the Tipiṭaka, which is the sacred canon of Theravāda Buddhism and contains much of the Buddha’s speech. Closeley related to Sanskrit, both languages are used interchangeably between religions.

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Marathi-English dictionary

Source: DDSA: The Molesworth Marathi and English Dictionary

kañcana (कंचन).—m (kāñcana S) A flower tree and its flower, Michelia champaca. 2 Mountain ebony, Bauhinia variegata.

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kāñcana (कांचन).—n (S) Gold. 2 A tree bearing a yellow fragrant flower, Michelia Champaca. 3 Mountain ebony, Bauhinia variegata. 4 One of the suits of cards.

Source: DDSA: The Aryabhusan school dictionary, Marathi-English

kāñcana (कांचन).—n Gold. Mountain ebony.

context information

Marathi is an Indo-European language having over 70 million native speakers people in (predominantly) Maharashtra India. Marathi, like many other Indo-Aryan languages, evolved from early forms of Prakrit, which itself is a subset of Sanskrit, one of the most ancient languages of the world.

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Sanskrit dictionary

Source: DDSA: The practical Sanskrit-English dictionary

Kāñcana (काञ्चन).—a. (- f.) [काञ्च्-ल्युट् (kāñc-lyuṭ)] Golden, made of gold; तन्मध्ये च स्फटिकफलका काञ्चनी वासयष्टिः (tanmadhye ca sphaṭikaphalakā kāñcanī vāsayaṣṭiḥ) Meghadūta 81; काञ्चनं वलयम् (kāñcanaṃ valayam) Ś.6.8; Manusmṛti 5.112.

-nam 1 Gold; समलोष्टाश्मकाञ्चनः (samaloṣṭāśmakāñcanaḥ) Bhagavadgītā (Bombay) 14.24. (grāhyam) अमेध्यादपि काञ्चनम् (amedhyādapi kāñcanam) Manusmṛti 2.239.

2) Lustre, brilliancy.

3) Property, wealth, money.

4) The filament of a lotus.

5) Yellow orpiment.

6) A binding.

-naḥ 1 The Dhattūra plant.

2) The Champaka tree.

-nī 1 Turmeric.

2) Yellow orpiment.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Edgerton Buddhist Hybrid Sanskrit Dictionary

Kāñcana (काञ्चन).—m. (1) gold (in Sanskrit only nt.): Lalitavistara 122.16 (verse) nā bhāsī itaraḥ sa kāñcana (read °naḥ, m.c.) prabhasi- rirahitaḥ; (2) name of a kind of tree (in Sanskrit Lexx. applied to several trees; Prakrit kaṃcana, m., according to [Paia-sadda-mahaṇṇavo] a kind [Page176-a+ 71] of tree): Mahā-Māyūrī 258.10 (mahāvṛkṣa); Mūla-Sarvāstivāda-Vinaya i.286.10; MPS 49.25.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Shabda-Sagara Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Kāñcana (काञ्चन).—mfn.

(-naḥ-nī-naṃ) Golden, of gold. n.

(-naṃ) 1. Gold. 2. Wealth. 3. A filament of the lotus. m.

(-naḥ) 1. Mountain ebony, (Bauhinia variegata, &c.) 2. A tree bearing a yellow fragrant flower, (Michelia champaca.) 3. Another plant, (Mesua ferrea:) see nāgakesara. 4. Glomerous fig-tree: see uḍumbara. 5. Common thorn apple, (Datura metel.) f. (-nī) 1. Turmeric. 2. A yellow pigment. E. kaci to shine, &c. lyuṭ affix, the radical vowel lengthened; this etymology gives the meaning gold, the others refer to their colour, &c. in which they resemble the metal.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Benfey Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Kāñcana (काञ्चन).—I. n. 1. Gold. [Mānavadharmaśāstra] 2, 239. 2. Wealth, [Bhartṛhari, (ed. Bohlen.)] 2, 33. Ii. adj., f. , Golden, [Mānavadharmaśāstra] 5, 112; [Rāmāyaṇa] 3, 52, 21. Iii. m. A proper name, [Bhāgavata-Purāṇa, (ed. Burnouf.)] 9, 15, 3.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Cappeller Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Kāñcana (काञ्चन).—1. [neuter] gold.

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Kāñcana (काञ्चन).—2. [feminine] ī golden; [masculine] & [feminine] [Name] of [several] plants.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Aufrecht Catalogus Catalogorum

Kāñcana (काञ्चन) as mentioned in Aufrecht’s Catalogus Catalogorum:—son of Nārāyaṇa Vādīśvara, wrote by order of Jayadeva: Dhanaṃjayavijaya vyāyoga. In the introduction he mentions Gadādhara. Śp. p. 15.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Monier-Williams Sanskrit-English Dictionary

1) Kāñcana (काञ्चन):—[from kāñc] n. gold, [Naighaṇṭuka, commented on by Yāska i, 2; Manu-smṛti; Yājñavalkya; Nalopākhyāna; Suśruta; Hitopadeśa]

2) [v.s. ...] money, wealth, property, [Horace H. Wilson]

3) [v.s. ...] the filament of the lotus, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

4) [v.s. ...] mf(ī)n. golden, made or consisting of gold, [Mahābhārata; Rāmāyaṇa; Manu-smṛti; Meghadūta; Śakuntalā; Bhāgavata-purāṇa]

5) [v.s. ...] m. Name of several edible plants (Mesua ferrea, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]; Michelia Champaca, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]; Ficus glomerata, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]; Bauhinia variegata, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]; Datura fastuosa, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]; Rottleria tinctoria, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.])

6) [v.s. ...] a covenant binding for the whole life, [Kāmandakīya-nītisāra] (= [Hitopadeśa])

7) [v.s. ...] a particular form of temple, [Hemādri’s Caturvarga-cintāmaṇi]

8) [v.s. ...] Name of the fifth Buddha, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

9) [v.s. ...] Name of a son of Nārāyaṇa (author of the play Dhanaṃjaya-vijaya)

10) [v.s. ...] Name of a prince (cf. kāñcana-prabha)

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Yates Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Kāñcana (काञ्चन):—(naṃ) 1. 3. n. Gold; wealth; filament of a lotus. (naḥ) m. Mountain ebony. () f. Turmeric. a. Golden.

Source: DDSA: Paia-sadda-mahannavo; a comprehensive Prakrit Hindi dictionary (S)

Kāñcana (काञ्चन) in the Sanskrit language is related to the Prakrit words: Kaṃcaṇa, Kaṃcaṇā.

[Sanskrit to German]

Kancana in German

context information

Sanskrit, also spelled संस्कृतम् (saṃskṛtam), is an ancient language of India commonly seen as the grandmother of the Indo-European language family (even English!). Closely allied with Prakrit and Pali, Sanskrit is more exhaustive in both grammar and terms and has the most extensive collection of literature in the world, greatly surpassing its sister-languages Greek and Latin.

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Prakrit-English dictionary

Source: DDSA: Paia-sadda-mahannavo; a comprehensive Prakrit Hindi dictionary

1) Kaṃcaṇa (कंचण) in the Prakrit language is related to the Sanskrit word: Kāñcana.

2) Kaṃcaṇa (कंचण) also relates to the Sanskrit word: Kāñcana.

3) Kaṃcaṇā (कंचणा) also relates to the Sanskrit word: Kañcanā.

context information

Prakrit is an ancient language closely associated with both Pali and Sanskrit. Jain literature is often composed in this language or sub-dialects, such as the Agamas and their commentaries which are written in Ardhamagadhi and Maharashtri Prakrit. The earliest extant texts can be dated to as early as the 4th century BCE although core portions might be older.

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Kannada-English dictionary

Source: Alar: Kannada-English corpus

Kāṃcaṇa (ಕಾಂಚಣ):—[noun] = ಕಾಂಚಾಣ [kamcana]1.

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Kāṃcana (ಕಾಂಚನ):—

1) [noun] a yellow malleable ductile high-density metallic element resistant to chemical reaction, occurring naturally in quartz veins and gravel, and precious as a monetary medium, in jewellery, etc. (symbol Au); gold.

2) [noun] a current medium of exchange in the form of coins and bank notes; money.

3) [noun] the quality, condition or fact of shining by reflected light; gloss; sheen; lustre; brilliancy.

4) [noun] wealth a) much money or property; great amount of worldly possessions; riches; b) the state of having much money or property; affluence.

5) [noun] the filament of a lotus flower.

6) [noun] arsenic trisulfide, As2S3, having a lemon-yellow colour and a resinous luster, used as a pigment; orpiment.

7) [noun] the plant Datura stramonium of Solanaceae family.

8) [noun] the tree Mesua ferrea of Guttiferae family.

9) [noun] its flower.

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Kāṃcāṇa (ಕಾಂಚಾಣ):—[noun] = ಕಾಂಚನ - [kamcana -] 1 & 2.

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Kāṃcāṇa (ಕಾಂಚಾಣ):—[noun] = ಕಾಂಚಾಳ [kamcala].

context information

Kannada is a Dravidian language (as opposed to the Indo-European language family) mainly spoken in the southwestern region of India.

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