Kamasukha, aka: Kāmasukha, Kama-sukha; 2 Definition(s)

Introduction

Kamasukha means something in Buddhism, Pali. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

In Buddhism

Mahayana (major branch of Buddhism)

[Kamasukha in Mahayana glossaries]

Kāmasukha (कामसुख).—According to the Mahāprajñāpāramitāśāstra (chapter XIV): Why does the Buddha first emit light from his body? ... 3) All beings are attached (sakta) to sensory pleasure (kāmasukha) and the first of the five sensory objects is form (rūpa). Seeing the marvelous light of the Buddha, their mind becomes attached to it; they renounce their earlier pleasures; their mind becomes detached little by little from sensory objects and then wisdom can be preached to them.

(Source): Wisdom Library: Maha Prajnaparamita Sastra
Mahayana book cover
context information

Mahayana (महायान, mahāyāna) is a major branch of Buddhism focusing on the path of a Bodhisattva (spiritual aspirants/ enlightened beings). Extant literature is vast and primarely composed in the Sanskrit language. There are many sūtras of which some of the earliest are the various Prajñāpāramitā sūtras.

Discover the meaning of kamasukha in the context of Mahayana from relevant books on Exotic India

Languages of India and abroad

Pali-English dictionary

[Kamasukha in Pali glossaries]

kāmasukha : (nt.) happiness arising from sensual pleasures.

(Source): BuddhaSasana: Concise Pali-English Dictionary
Pali book cover
context information

Pali is the language of the Tipiṭaka, which is the sacred canon of Theravāda Buddhism and contains much of the Buddha’s speech. Closeley related to Sanskrit, both languages are used interchangeably between religions.

Discover the meaning of kamasukha in the context of Pali from relevant books on Exotic India

Relevant definitions

Search found 1022 related definition(s) that might help you understand this better. Below you will find the 15 most relevant articles:

Kama
Kāma (काम, “love”) is accomplished by performing mantrasādhana (preparatory procedures) beginni...
Sukha
Sukha (सुख, “pleasure”) and Duḥkha (pain) refers to two of the twenty-four guṇas (qualities) ac...
Kamala
Kamalā (कमला), daughter of Devala, is one of the twelve female friends of Mahallikā: daughter o...
Kamarupa
Kāmarūpa (कामरूप).—a. 1) taking any form at will; जानामि त्वां प्रकृतिपुरुषं कामरूपं मघोनः (jān...
Kamadhenu
Kāmadhenu (कामधेनु) or Kāmadhenumudrā or Surabhi is the name of a mudrā described in the Īśvara...
Kamadeva
Kāmadeva (कामदेव).—See under Kāma.
Sukhavaha
Sukhāvaha (सुखावह) or Sukhāvahamūrti refers to one of the twenty-eighth forms (mūrti) of Śiva m...
Sukhasana
1) Sukhāsana (सुखासन) or Sukhāsanamūrti refers to one of the twenty-three forms (mūrti) of Śiva...
Kamada
Kāmadā (कामदा) refers to the name of a Lady mentioned in the Mahābhārata (cf. IX.45.27). Note:...
Kamakshi
Kāmākṣī (कामाक्षी).—Name of Durgā. Kāmākṣī is a Sanskrit compound consisting of the terms kāma ...
Kamakhya
Kāmākhyā (कामाख्या).—Name of Durgā. Kāmākhyā is a Sanskrit compound consisting of the terms kām...
Kamashastra
Kāmaśāstra (कामशास्त्र) refers to the “science of erotics” and represents one of the nine divis...
Sarvakama
Sarvakāma (सर्वकाम).—Son of King Ṛtuparṇa. (Bhāgavata, Skandha 9).
Kamacchanda
Kāmacchanda (कामच्छन्द, “envy”) according to the 2nd century Mahāprajñāpāramitāśāstra (chapter ...
Kamatanha
Kama-tanha (sense-craving) is described as follows: 1) Pali: kāma-taṇhā 2) Also refe...

Relevant text

Like what you read? Consider supporting this website: