Kamala, aka: Kāmāla, Kamalā, Kāmalā, Kama-la; 19 Definition(s)

Introduction

Kamala means something in Hinduism, Sanskrit, Buddhism, Pali, the history of ancient India, Marathi. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

In Hinduism

Shaktism (Shakta philosophy)

[Kamala in Shaktism glossaries]

1) Kamalā (कमला, “Lotus”):—One of the female offspring from Mahālakṣmī (rajas-form of Mahādevī). Mahālakṣmī is one of the three primary forms of Devī, the other two being Mahākālī and Mahāsarasvatī. Not to be confused with Lakṣmī, she is a more powerful cosmic aspect (vyaṣṭi) of Devi and represents the guṇa (universal energy) named rajas. Also see the Devī Māhātmya, a Sanskrit work from the 5th century, incorporated into the Mārkaṇḍeya-Purāṇa.

2) Kamalā (कमला, “the lotus”):—The tenth of the ten Mahāvidyās. She represents the Power of Wealth. She is the consort of Sadāśivā (when he takes over the function of Viṣṇu sustaining the world). As the counterpart of Dhūmāvatī, she represents all the material and spiritual desirables. She is the embodiement of prosperity and universal well-being. The ten Mahāvidyās are the emanations of Mahākālī, the Goddess of time and death. She is depicted as a fearful laughing goddess with four arms entwined with poisonous snakes in her hair. She has three red eyes, a wagging tongue and feaful teeth. Her left foot is standing on a corpse

(Source): Wisdom Library: Śāktism

Kamalā rules over the auspicious nakṣatra Rohiṇī in Taurus, giver of wealth, while Dhūmāvatī rules over the nakṣatra Jyeṣṭhā in the sign Scorpio which brings poverty. Kamalā is the power inherent in prosperity as the energy of preservation she represents the potential for universal well-being that can only be accomplished through the correct utilisation of wealth.

Kamalā represents material well-being, comfort, the familiar. As the preserving energy she bestows stability and security —she represents the very state of mind which contributes to further continuity in Samsāra whereas Kālī represents the Liberating force. Kamalā consciousness is what one seeks to restrain, overcome and finally transcend.

(Source): Red Zambala: The 10 Great Wisdom Goddesses
Shaktism book cover
context information

Shakta (शाक्त, śākta) or Shaktism (śāktism) represents a tradition of Hinduism where the Goddess (Devi) is revered and worshipped. Shakta literature includes a range of scriptures, including various Agamas and Tantras, although its roots may be traced back to the Vedas.

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Ayurveda (science of life)

[Kamala in Ayurveda glossaries]

Kamala (कमल) is a Sanskrit technical term translating to the color “lotus” or “lotus-flower”, but can also refer to “pale-red”, “rose-coloured” etc. and in a different context can also refer to “desirous”, “lustful” etc. It is used throughout Āyurvedic literature such as the Suśrutasaṃhita or the Carakasaṃhita.

(Source): Wisdom Library: Āyurveda and botany

Kāmalā (कामला) refers to “hepatitis” (inflammation of the liver, irrespective of the cause). Vatsanābha (Aconitum ferox), although categorized as sthāvara-viṣa (vegetable poisons), has been extensively used in ayurvedic pharmacopoeia.

(Source): Research Gate: Internal applications of Vatsanabha (Aconitum ferox wall)
Ayurveda book cover
context information

Āyurveda (आयुर्वेद, ayurveda) is a branch of Indian science dealing with medicine, herbalism, taxology, anatomy, surgery, alchemy and related topics. Traditional practice of Āyurveda in ancient India dates back to at least the first millenium BC. Literature is commonly written in Sanskrit using various poetic metres.

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Purana

[Kamala in Purana glossaries]

Kamala (कमल) refers to the lotus and represents flowers (puṣpa) once commonly used in ancient Kashmir (Kaśmīra) as mentioned in the Nīlamatapurāṇa. The lotus is also called by the names Jalaja (verse 45), Padma, Nīlanalina and Nīlotpala (verse 62 and 339), Jātī (verse 429), Irā (verse 673-675ff.) and Kunda (verse 495).

(Source): archive.org: Nilamata Purana: a cultural and literary study

1) Kamalā (कमला).—Mother of Prahlāda. (Padma Purāṇa).

2) Kamalā (कमला).—A follower of Skandadeva. (Śloka 9, Chapter 46, Śalya Parva, Mahābhārata).

(Source): archive.org: Puranic Encyclopaedia

1a) Kamalā (कमला).—Brahmā's consort; see also lakṣmī, śrī.*

  • * Brahmāṇḍa-purāṇa IV. 15. 37; 39. 67.

1b) An Apsaras.*

  • * Vāyu-purāṇa 69. 7.

2) Kāmalā (कामला).—A goddess enshrined at Kamalālaya.*

  • * Matsya-purāṇa 13. 32.
(Source): Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: The Purana Index
Purana book cover
context information

The Purana (पुराण, purāṇas) refers to Sanskrit literature preserving ancient India’s vast cultural history, including historical legends, religious ceremonies, various arts and sciences. The eighteen mahapuranas total over 400,000 shlokas (metrical couplets) and date to at least several centuries BCE.

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Chandas (prosody, study of Sanskrit metres)

[Kamala in Chandas glossaries]

1) Kamala (कमल) refers to one of the 130 varṇavṛttas (syllabo-quantitative verse) dealt with in the second chapter of the Vṛttamuktāvalī, ascribed to Durgādatta (19th century), author of eight Sanskrit work and patronised by Hindupati: an ancient king of the Bundela tribe (presently Bundelkhand of Uttar Pradesh). A Varṇavṛtta (eg., kamala) refers to a type of classical Sanskrit metre depending on syllable count where the light-heavy patterns are fixed.

2) Kamala (कमल) refers to one of the 130 varṇavṛttas (syllabo-quantitative verse) dealt with in the second chapter of the Vṛttamuktāvalī, ascribed to Durgādatta (19th century), author of eight Sanskrit work and patronised by Hindupati: an ancient king of the Bundela tribe (presently Bundelkhand of Uttar Pradesh). A Varṇavṛtta (eg., kamala) refers to a type of classical Sanskrit metre depending on syllable count where the light-heavy patterns are fixed.

3) Kamalā (कमला) refers to one of the 130 varṇavṛttas (syllabo-quantitative verse) dealt with in the second chapter of the Vṛttamuktāvalī, ascribed to Durgādatta (19th century), author of eight Sanskrit work and patronised by Hindupati: an ancient king of the Bundela tribe (presently Bundelkhand of Uttar Pradesh). A Varṇavṛtta (eg., kamalā) refers to a type of classical Sanskrit metre depending on syllable count where the light-heavy patterns are fixed.

4) Kamalā (कमला) refers to one of the 130 varṇavṛttas (syllabo-quantitative verse) dealt with in the second chapter of the Vṛttamuktāvalī, ascribed to Durgādatta (19th century), author of eight Sanskrit work and patronised by Hindupati: an ancient king of the Bundela tribe (presently Bundelkhand of Uttar Pradesh). A Varṇavṛtta (eg., kamalā) refers to a type of classical Sanskrit metre depending on syllable count where the light-heavy patterns are fixed.

(Source): Shodhganga: a concise history of Sanskrit Chanda literature
Chandas book cover
context information

Chandas (छन्दस्) refers to Sanskrit prosody and represents one of the six Vedangas (auxiliary disciplines belonging to the study of the Vedas). The science of prosody (chandas-shastra) focusses on the study of the poetic meters such as the commonly known twenty-six metres mentioned by Pingalas.

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Itihasa (narrative history)

[Kamala in Itihasa glossaries]

Kamalā (कमला) refers to the name of a Lady mentioned in the Mahābhārata (cf. IX.45.9). Note: The Mahābhārata (mentioning Kamalā) is a Sanskrit epic poem consisting of 100,000 ślokas (metrical verses) and is over 2000 years old.

(Source): JatLand: List of Mahabharata people and places
context information

Itihasa (इतिहास, itihāsa) refers to ‘epic history’ and represents a branch of Sanskrit literature which popularly includes 1) the eighteen major Puranas, 2) the Mahabharata and 3) the Ramayana. It is a branch of Vedic Hinduism categorised as smriti literature (‘that which is remembered’) as opposed to shruti literature (‘that which is transmitted verbally’).

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Katha (narrative stories)

[Kamala in Katha glossaries]

Kamalā (कमला), daughter of Devala, is one of the twelve female friends of Mahallikā: daughter of Prahlāda, according to the Kathāsaritsāgara, chapter 45. Accordingly, as Mahallikā said to Sūryaprabha: “... my female friends are not only two, but twelve in number, and my father’s brother carried them off from Indra’s heaven... And the third is Kālindī, the fourth Bhadrakā, and the fifth is the noble Kamalā with beautiful eyes. These three are the daughters of the great hermit Devala... They [eg., Kamalā] are all heavenly nymphs, born from Apsarases, and when I was married they were taken to the first underworld, and I must bestow them on you, in order that I may be always with them”.

The story of Kamalā and Mahallikā was narrated by the Vidyādhara king Vajraprabha to prince Naravāhanadatta in order to relate how “Sūryaprabha, being a man, obtain of old time the sovereignty over the Vidyādharas”.

The Kathāsaritsāgara (‘ocean of streams of story’), mentioning Kamalā, is a famous Sanskrit epic story revolving around prince Naravāhanadatta and his quest to become the emperor of the vidyādharas (celestial beings). The work is said to have been an adaptation of Guṇāḍhya’s Bṛhatkathā consisting of 100,000 verses, which in turn is part of a larger work containing 700,000 verses.

(Source): Wisdom Library: Kathāsaritsāgara
Katha book cover
context information

Katha (कथा, kathā) refers to narrative Sanskrit literature often inspired from epic legendry (itihasa) and poetry (mahākāvya). Some Kathas reflect socio-political instructions for the King while others remind the reader of important historical event and exploits of the Gods, Heroes and Sages.

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General definition (in Hinduism)

[Kamala in Hinduism glossaries]

Kāmāla (jaundice) is a Sanskrit term used in Ayurveda.

(Source): Wisdom Library: Hinduism

1) Kamala: One of the ten Mahavidyas (a group of ten aspects of the Divine Mother Durga). From Kamala, Lord Buddha was incarnated.

2) Kamala is a common Hindu name, usually meaning Nelumbo nucifera, the lotus. Variants include Kamal and Kamla.

(Source): WikiPedia: Hinduism

kamala/kamalam–(“pale-red, rose-colored”) lotus-frlower Nelumbium Speciosum;

(Source): Academia.edu: Flowers of Consciousness in Tantric Texts

India history and geogprahy

[Kamala in India history glossaries]

Kamala is one of the exogamous septs (divisions) among the Komatis (a trading caste of the Madras Presidency). Kamala refers to the plant Kamalam (white lotus). The Komatis are said to have originally lived, and still live in large numbers on the banks of the Godavari river. One of the local names thereof is Gomati or Gomti, and the Sanskrit Gomati would, in Telugu, become corrupted into Komati. The sub-divisions are split up into septs (viz., Kamala), which are of a strictly exogamous character.

(Source): Project Gutenberg: Castes and Tribes of Southern India, Volume 1
India history book cover
context information

The history of India traces the identification of countries, villages, towns and other regions of India, as well as royal dynasties, rulers, tribes, local festivities and traditions and regional languages. Ancient India enjoyed religious freedom and encourages the path of Dharma, a concept common to Buddhism, Hinduism, and Jainism.

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Languages of India and abroad

Pali-English dictionary

[Kamala in Pali glossaries]

kamala : (nt.) a lotus.

(Source): BuddhaSasana: Concise Pali-English Dictionary

Kamala, (nt.) a lotus, freq. combd with kuvalaya; or with uppala J. I, 146; DA. I, 40, expld as vārikiñjakkha PvA. 77. 1. lotus, the lotus flower, Nelumbium J. I, 146; DA. I, 40; Mhbv 3; Sdhp. 325; VvA. 43, 181, 191; PvA. 23, 77;— At J. I, 119, 149 a better reading is obtained by corr. kambala to kamala, at J. I, 178 however kamb° should be retained. - 2. a kind of grass, of which sandals were made Vin. I. 190 (s. Vin. Texts II. 23 n.) — 3. f. kamalā a graceful woman J. V, 160;

—komalakarā (f.) (of a woman) having lotus-like (soft) hands Mhbv 29; —dala a lotus leaf Vism. 465; Mhbv 3; Bdhd 19; DhsA. 127; VvA. 35, 38.——pādukā sandals of k. grass Vin. I, 190. (Page 189)

(Source): Sutta: The Pali Text Society's Pali-English Dictionary
Pali book cover
context information

Pali is the language of the Tipiṭaka, which is the sacred canon of Theravāda Buddhism and contains much of the Buddha’s speech. Closeley related to Sanskrit, both languages are used interchangeably between religions.

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Marathi-English dictionary

[Kamala in Marathi glossaries]

kamala (कमल).—n (S) A lotus, Nymphæa (rubra &c.) Grah. 2 A lotus-form vessel or stand for an idol. 3 Added by poets to mukha or vadana, nētra or lōcana, kara or hasta, pāda or caraṇa, hṛt, nāmi &c. in eulogy of their form.

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kamalā (कमला).—f (S) pop. kamaḷā f A name of Lakshmi, and hence applied to an excellent woman.

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kamaḷa (कमळ).—n (kamala S) A lotus. 2 Lotus-form vessel or stand. 3 Applied descriptively to kēḷaphūla.

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kamāla (कमाल).—n ( A Perfection or completeness.) The highest revenue (of a village or tract); settled by measurement, not of its cultivation, but of its whole arable, including fallow, and by estimating the produce if all be cultivated up to its full power. Also kamāla tanakhā m in this sense. kamāla, retaining its Arabic sense of Completeness or Wholeness, forms in Revenue-matters numerous compounds: as kamālapatraka n or kamālajhāḍā m General roll or schedule of the totals of tanakhā, ragabā, kūḷa, ināma, mōjaṇī, vasūla, dara &c. kamāla- ragabā The lands (of a tālukā or a village) collectively. kamāla ināma-dara-mōjaṇī-vasūla-ṭhikēbandī- ākāra-lāvaṇī-vahīta-paḍīta-gāyarāna-haḍōḷā -&c. The original Inams collectively, the original or full assessment, survey, revenue &c. For kamāla in these compounds kamālī is sometimes used. 2 By persons conversant with Muhammadans kamāla, meaning Perfectness or fullness, is used without restriction: as kamāla daulata-nasība-kṛpā-mēharabānī- pīka-bharaṇā-bharatī-pūra-sastāī-laḍhāī-thaṇḍī-ūnha &c.: also without composition, as jarīmarīcēṃ ka0, daridrācēṃ ka0.

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kāmalā (कामला).—f S See the popular word kāmīṇa.

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kāmaḷa (कामळ).—f P A disease. See kamīṇa.

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kāmaḷā (कामळा).—See under kāmbaḷā.

(Source): DDSA: The Molesworth Marathi and English Dictionary

kamala (कमल) [-ḷa, -ळ].—n A lotus. A lotus form vessel or stand.

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kamāla (कमाल).—n The highest or maximum revenue assessed on land. Perfectness.

(Source): DDSA: The Aryabhusan school dictionary, Marathi-English
context information

Marathi is an Indo-European language having over 70 million native speakers people in (predominantly) Maharashtra India. Marathi, like many other Indo-Aryan languages, evolved from early forms of Prakrit, which itself is a subset of Sanskrit, one of the most ancient languages of the world.

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Sanskrit-English dictionary

[Kamala in Sanskrit glossaries]

Kamala (कमल).—a.

1) Desirous.

2) Palered.

-laḥ 1 The &Sārasa bird.

2) A kind of deer.

3) Name of Brahmā.

-lī A collection of lotuses.

-lam [kam-kalac]

1) A lotus; कमल- मनम्भसि कमले च कुवलये तानि कनकललतिकायाम् (kamala- manambhasi kamale ca kuvalaye tāni kanakalalatikāyām) K. P.1; so हस्त°, नेत्र°, चरण° (hasta°, netra°, caraṇa°), &c.

2) Water; N.1.13; सकमलं कमलम् (sakamalaṃ kamalam) Ki.5.25. कमलासन-कमलेक्षण-कमलारिकिरीट-कमलभृद्वाहैः (kamalāsana-kamalekṣaṇa-kamalārikirīṭa-kamalabhṛdvāhaiḥ) Subhās. (lakṣmīpraśaṃsā).

3) Copper.

4) A medicament, drug.

5) The Sārasa bird.

6) The bladder, the right lobe of the lungs.

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Kamalā (कमला).—

1) An epithet of Lakṣmī.

2) An excellent woman.

3) An orange.

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Kāmala (कामल).—a. Lustful, libidinous.

-laḥ 1 The spring.

2) A desert.

3) Excessive obstruction of bile.

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Kāmalā (कामला).—the plantain tree.

Kāmalā is a Sanskrit compound consisting of the terms kāma and (ला).

(Source): DDSA: The practical Sanskrit-English dictionary
context information

Sanskrit, also spelled संस्कृतम् (saṃskṛtam), is an ancient language of India commonly seen as the grandmother of the Indo-European language family. Closely allied with Prakrit and Pali, Sanskrit is more exhaustive in both grammar and terms and has the most extensive collection of literature in the world, greatly surpassing its sister-languages Greek and Latin.

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