Kamakshi Amman, Kāmākṣī Amman: 1 definition

Introduction

Kamakshi Amman means something in the history of ancient India. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

India history and geogprahy

[«previous (K) next»] — Kamakshi Amman in India history glossary
Source: Shodhganga: The significance of the mūla-beras (history)

Kamakshi Amman Temple in  Kanchipuram represents a sacred place for the worship of The Goddess (Devī).—The shrine remains the centre of devotion and attraction for the people. It is so situated that all cars of other shrines have necessarily to go round Devī Kāmākṣī. In Kāñcī, there are twelve temples for Parāśakti. But this Kāmākṣī Amman Temple is said to be the foremost and is hence called Ādi-pīṭha (the first place goddess Pārvatī came to the world). It is the oldest temple and dates back to the 11th century. A large hall with ornate pillars enshrines the standing image of the four armed goddess called Lalita Kāmākṣī.

Kamakshi Amman according to sthala-purāṇas: The Devas prayed to Śiva to destroy Bandakāsūra who harassed them. Śiva told the devas to enter the tunnel at Mount Kailas and reach Kāñcī, and worship Kāmākṣī. They did as advised by Śiva. At the request of the devas, Kāmākṣī rose in anger and killed the asura and returned to Kāñcī. There she is found suppressing her anger.

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The history of India traces the identification of countries, villages, towns and other regions of India, as well as royal dynasties, rulers, tribes, local festivities and traditions and regional languages. Ancient India enjoyed religious freedom and encourages the path of Dharma, a concept common to Buddhism, Hinduism, and Jainism.

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