Kamaguna, aka: Kama-guna, Kāmaguṇa; 4 Definition(s)

Introduction

Kamaguna means something in Buddhism, Pali, Hinduism, Sanskrit. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

In Buddhism

Theravada (major branch of Buddhism)

Kamaguna in Theravada glossary... « previous · [K] · next »
Strings of sensuality. The objects of the five physical senses: visible objects, sounds, aromas, flavors, and tactile sensations. Usually refers to sense experiences that, like the strings (guna) of a lute when plucked, give rise to pleasurable feelings (vedana).Source: Access to Insight: A Glossary of Pali and Buddhist Terms

s. kāma.

Source: Pali Kanon: Manual of Buddhist Terms and Doctrines
context information

Theravāda is a major branch of Buddhism having the the Pali canon (tipitaka) as their canonical literature, which includes the vinaya-pitaka (monastic rules), the sutta-pitaka (Buddhist sermons) and the abhidhamma-pitaka (philosophy and psychology).

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Languages of India and abroad

Pali-English dictionary

Kamaguna in Pali glossary... « previous · [K] · next »

kāmaguṇa : (m.) sensual pleasure.

Source: BuddhaSasana: Concise Pali-English Dictionary
Pali book cover
context information

Pali is the language of the Tipiṭaka, which is the sacred canon of Theravāda Buddhism and contains much of the Buddha’s speech. Closeley related to Sanskrit, both languages are used interchangeably between religions.

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Sanskrit-English dictionary

Kamaguna in Sanskrit glossary... « previous · [K] · next »

Kāmaguṇa (कामगुण).—

1) the quality of passion, affection.

2) satiety, perfect enjoyment.

3) an object of sense.

Derivable forms: kāmaguṇaḥ (कामगुणः).

Kāmaguṇa is a Sanskrit compound consisting of the terms kāma and guṇa (गुण).

Source: DDSA: The practical Sanskrit-English dictionary
context information

Sanskrit, also spelled संस्कृतम् (saṃskṛtam), is an ancient language of India commonly seen as the grandmother of the Indo-European language family. Closely allied with Prakrit and Pali, Sanskrit is more exhaustive in both grammar and terms and has the most extensive collection of literature in the world, greatly surpassing its sister-languages Greek and Latin.

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Relevant definitions

Search found 1355 related definition(s) that might help you understand this better. Below you will find the 15 most relevant articles:

Guna
Guṇa (गुण, “quality”).—The Sāṃkhya system uses the term guṇa in the sense of the constituent el...
Kama
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Kamala
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Kamarupa
Kāmarūpa (कामरूप).—a. 1) taking any form at will; जानामि त्वां प्रकृतिपुरुषं कामरूपं मघोनः (jān...
Kamadhenu
Kāmadhenu (कामधेनु) refers to the “celestial cow” and represents one of the several “attributes...
Kamadeva
Kāmadeva (कामदेव).—See under Kāma.
Gunadhya
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Kamakhya
Kāmākhya (कामाख्य) refers to the name of a Tīrtha (pilgrim’s destination) mentioned in the Mah...
Gunakara
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Triguna
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Kamada
Kāmadā (कामदा) refers to the name of a Lady mentioned in the Mahābhārata (cf. IX.45.27). Note:...
Kamakshi
Kāmākṣī (कामाक्षी).—Name of Durgā. Kāmākṣī is a Sanskrit compound consisting of the terms kāma ...
Nirguna
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Kamashastra
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Sarvakama
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