Kalindi, aka: Kālindī; 9 Definition(s)

Introduction

Kalindi means something in Buddhism, Pali, Hinduism, Sanskrit, the history of ancient India. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

In Hinduism

Katha (narrative stories)

Kalindi in Katha glossary... « previous · [K] · next »

Kālindī (कालिन्दी), daughter of Devala, is one of the twelve female friends of Mahallikā: daughter of Prahlāda, according to the Kathāsaritsāgara, chapter 45. Accordingly, as Mahallikā said to Sūryaprabha: “... my female friends are not only two, but twelve in number, and my father’s brother carried them off from Indra’s heaven... And the third is Kālindī, the fourth Bhadrakā, and the fifth is the noble Kamalā with beautiful eyes. These three are the daughters of the great hermit Devala... They [eg., Kālindī] are all heavenly nymphs, born from Apsarases, and when I was married they were taken to the first underworld, and I must bestow them on you, in order that I may be always with them”.

The story of Kālindī and Mahallikā was narrated by the Vidyādhara king Vajraprabha to prince Naravāhanadatta in order to relate how “Sūryaprabha, being a man, obtain of old time the sovereignty over the Vidyādharas”.

The Kathāsaritsāgara (‘ocean of streams of story’), mentioning Kālindī, is a famous Sanskrit epic story revolving around prince Naravāhanadatta and his quest to become the emperor of the vidyādharas (celestial beings). The work is said to have been an adaptation of Guṇāḍhya’s Bṛhatkathā consisting of 100,000 verses, which in turn is part of a larger work containing 700,000 verses.

Source: Wisdom Library: Kathāsaritsāgara
Katha book cover
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Katha (कथा, kathā) refers to narrative Sanskrit literature often inspired from epic legendry (itihasa) and poetry (mahākāvya). Some Kathas reflect socio-political instructions for the King while others remind the reader of important historical event and exploits of the Gods, Heroes and Sages.

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Purana and Itihasa (epic history)

Kalindi in Purana glossary... « previous · [K] · next »

Kālindī (कालिन्दी).—(YAMUNĀ). General. Kālindī alias Yamunā is one of the holy rivers in India. The presiding deity of the river is Kālindīdevī. Kālindī, the daughter of the sun has her source in Kalinda mountaiṇ, and hence the name Kālindī for the river. Kālindī joins the Gaṅgā at Prayāga, and this confluence of the two rivers is called Saṅgama, which is a sacred place. (See full article at Story of Kālindī from the Puranic encyclopaedia by Vettam Mani)

Source: archive.org: Puranic Encyclopaedia

1a) Kālindī (कालिन्दी).—The daughter of Samjñā.*

  • * Vāyu-purāṇa 84. 36.

1b) The daughter of the sun god; wandering in the forest in quest of Kṛṣṇa, she expressed herself to Arjuna who was there with Kṛṣṇa; the latter married her; welcomed by Draupadī to Hāstinapura, she narrated to her how she married Kṛṣṇa.1 Devī and wife of Kṛṣṇa; mother of Śruta and other sons.2

  • 1) Bhāgavata-purāṇa X. 58. 17-23, 29; 71. 43; 83. 11; Matsya-purāṇa 47. 14.
  • 2) Vāyu-purāṇa 96. 234; Viṣṇu-purāṇa V. 28. 3; 32. 4.

1c) A R. of the Ketumāla country.*

  • * Vāyu-purāṇa 44. 21.

1d) A name for Yamunā.*

  • * Viṣṇu-purāṇa V. 7. 2; 18. 34; VI. 8. 36.
Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: The Purana Index

Kālindī (कालिन्दी) refers to the name of a River mentioned in the Mahābhārata (cf. II.9.18, II.9, IV.5.4). Note: The Mahābhārata (mentioning Kālindī) is a Sanskrit epic poem consisting of 100,000 ślokas (metrical verses) and is over 2000 years old.

Source: JatLand: List of Mahabharata people and places
Purana book cover
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The Purana (पुराण, purāṇas) refers to Sanskrit literature preserving ancient India’s vast cultural history, including historical legends, religious ceremonies, various arts and sciences. The eighteen mahapuranas total over 400,000 shlokas (metrical couplets) and date to at least several centuries BCE.

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General definition (in Hinduism)

Kalindi was the wife of Asita, a King of the Solar dynasty. Her husband fled to the Himalayas accompanied by his two wives after being defeated in battle. He died there, both his wives being pregnant at this time. Kalindi gave poison to her co-wife with the intention of inducing abortion, but the child Sagara was born safely, thanks to the grace of the sage Chyavana.

(Note: The verses [Rama:1.70.32-33] can also be interpreted to mean that Kalindi is the victim of poisoning and that Sagara is her son.)

Source: Apam Napat: Indian Mythology

Kālindī (कालिन्‍दी): Kālindī was daughter of the Surya (Sun) who marries Lord Krishna while he was ruling at Dwarka, Kālindī is also another name for the river Yamuna in northern India.

Source: WikiPedia: Hinduism

In Buddhism

Theravada (major branch of Buddhism)

A channel in the irrigation system of Parakkamabahu I., flowing southward from the Manihira tank. Cv.lxxix.54.

Source: Pali Kanon: Pali Proper Names
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Theravāda is a major branch of Buddhism having the the Pali canon (tipitaka) as their canonical literature, which includes the vinaya-pitaka (monastic rules), the sutta-pitaka (Buddhist sermons) and the abhidhamma-pitaka (philosophy and psychology).

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India history and geogprahy

Kālindī (कालिन्दी) is the name of a river mentioned in the Gupta inscription No. 18. The Gupta empire (r. 3rd-century CE), founded by Śrī Gupta, covered much of ancient India and embraced the Dharmic religions such as Hinduism, Buddhism and Jainism. According to the inscription in the reign of Budhagupta, his feudatory, Mahārāja Suraśmicandra was governing the country lying between the river Kālindī and Narmadā.

Kālindī is the same as the river Yamunā. The Yamunā has got its source from the Kalindadeśa, a mountainous country situated in the Bāndarapuccha range or the Himālaya and hence the river is called Kālindī. In the Purāṇas we get the earlier mention of Kālindī by both the names, Kālindī as well as Yamunā. The Kālindī is also mentioned in the Śiśupālavadha of Māga

Source: archive.org: Personal and geographical names in the Gupta inscriptions
India history book cover
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The history of India traces the identification of countries, villages, towns and other regions of India, as well as royal dynasties, rulers, tribes, local festivities and traditions and regional languages. Ancient India enjoyed religious freedom and encourages the path of Dharma, a concept common to Buddhism, Hinduism, and Jainism.

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Languages of India and abroad

Sanskrit-English dictionary

Kālindī (कालिन्दी).—f. (-ndī) The Yamuna or Jumna river. E. kālinda. A mountain, part of the Himalaya range, and the seat of the river’s source, aṇ aff.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Shabda-Sagara Sanskrit-English Dictionary
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Sanskrit, also spelled संस्कृतम् (saṃskṛtam), is an ancient language of India commonly seen as the grandmother of the Indo-European language family. Closely allied with Prakrit and Pali, Sanskrit is more exhaustive in both grammar and terms and has the most extensive collection of literature in the world, greatly surpassing its sister-languages Greek and Latin.

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Relevant definitions

Search found 46 related definition(s) that might help you understand this better. Below you will find the 15 most relevant articles:

Kalindidvipa
Kālindīdvīpa (कालिन्दीद्वीप).—It was on this island that Vyāsa was born as the result of the in...
Yamuna
Yamunā (यमुना) is the name of a river and rises in the Himalaya mountains among the Jumnotri pe...
Bhadra
Bhadra (भद्र).—mfn. (-draḥ-drā-draṃ) 1. Happy, prosperous, lucky, propitious. 2. Best, excellen...
Smriti
Smṛti (स्मृति).—f. (-tiḥ) 1. Recollection, remembrance, memory. 2. Law, the body of law, (civil...
Lavana
Lavaṇa (लवण).—mfn. (-ṇaḥ-ṇā-ṇaṃ) 1. Salt, saline. 2. Handsome, beautiful. n. (-ṇaṃ) 1. Sea-salt...
Surya
Sūrya (सूर्य) or Sūryya.—m. (-ryaḥ) 1. The sun. 2. Gigantic swallow wort, (Asclepias gigantea.)...
Asita
Asita (असित) is the name of a Ṛṣi, according to the Mahāprajñāpāramitāśāstra chapter XLV.—Accor...
Sudarshana
Sudarśana (सुदर्शन).—mfn. (-naḥ-nā or -nī-naṃ) 1. Handsome, good looking. 2. Easily seen. m. (-...
Shruta
Śruta (श्रुत).—mfn. (-taḥ-tā-taṃ) 1. Heard. 2. Understood. 3. Well-known. n. (-taṃ) 1. Sacred s...
Garuda
Garuḍa (गरुड) is one of the six divisions of sthānaka, one of the nine maṇḍala (postures of the...
Sagara
Sagara.—(IE 7-1-2), confused with sāgara and rarely used to indicate ‘seven’. Note: sagara is d...
Kamala
Kamala (कमल).—n. (-laṃ) 1. A lotus, (Nelumbium speciosum or Nymphæa nelumbo.) 2. Water. 3. Copp...
Arjuna
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Shanti
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Somaka
Somaka (सोमक) is the name of an ancient king who was conquered by Mahāsena, king of Ujjayinī, a...

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