Kalavapi, aka: Kālavāpi, Kala-vapi; 2 Definition(s)

Introduction

Kalavapi means something in the history of ancient India. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

India history and geogprahy

Kālavāpi is the name of an ancient locality corresponding to present Kalāvava (Kalāvāva), known since the ancient kingdom of Anurādhapura, Ceylon (Sri Lanka).—Dhātusena (455-473) built Kālavāpi, present Kalāvava, and Kālavāpi-vihāra. Twin with kalāvava was Balaluvava which still bears the same name, and was also built by Dhātusena. Parakkamabāhu I (1153-1186) restored Kālavāpi as well as the Jaya Gaṅgā: an inscription of this king gives the length of the bund of Kālavāpi as 1,700 riyan.

Source: archive.org: Ceylon Branch of the Royal Asiatic Society 1963

Kālavāpi (कालवापि) or Kālivāpi[?] is the name of a river as recorded in the Pāli Buddhist texts (detailing the geography of ancient India as it was known in to Early Buddhism).—Kālavāpi (cf. Mahāvaṃsa) was built by King Dhātusena by banking up the river Kaḷ-oya or Goṇanadī.

Source: Ancient Buddhist Texts: Geography of Early Buddhism
India history book cover
context information

The history of India traces the identification of countries, villages, towns and other regions of India, as well as royal dynasties, rulers, tribes, local festivities and traditions and regional languages. Ancient India enjoyed religious freedom and encourages the path of Dharma, a concept common to Buddhism, Hinduism, and Jainism.

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