Kalamba, Kalaṃba: 13 definitions

Introduction

Introduction:

Kalamba means something in Buddhism, Pali, Hinduism, Sanskrit, the history of ancient India, Marathi. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

In Hinduism

Ayurveda (science of life)

Source: Wisdom Library: Āyurveda and botany

Kalamba (कलम्ब) is a Sanskrit word referring to Ipomoea aquatica (water spinach), from the Convolvulaceae family. Certain plant parts of Kalamba are eaten as a vegetable (śāka), according to Caraka in his Carakasaṃhitā sūtrasthāna (chapter 27), a classical Ayurvedic work. The plant is therefore part of the Śākavarga group of medicinal plants, referring to the “group of vegetables/pot-herbs”. Caraka defined such groups (vargas) based on the dietic value of the plant.

According to the Rājanighaṇṭu, water spinach (kalamba) has the following synonyms: Kalambaka, Kalambī, Kalambukā and Kalambū.

Ayurveda book cover
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Āyurveda (आयुर्वेद, ayurveda) is a branch of Indian science dealing with medicine, herbalism, taxology, anatomy, surgery, alchemy and related topics. Traditional practice of Āyurveda in ancient India dates back to at least the first millenium BC. Literature is commonly written in Sanskrit using various poetic metres.

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Kavya (poetry)

[«previous next»] — Kalamba in Kavya glossary
Source: archive.org: Naisadhacarita of Sriharsa

Kalamba (कलम्ब) refers to a “mature sprout” or “the middle sprout of a leaf” and is mentioned in the Naiṣadha-carita 3.120. The reading in the printed edition (Chowkhamba, p. 107) is corrupt.

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Kavya (काव्य, kavya) refers to Sanskrit poetry, a popular ancient Indian tradition of literature. There have been many Sanskrit poets over the ages, hailing from ancient India and beyond. This topic includes mahakavya, or ‘epic poetry’ and natya, or ‘dramatic poetry’.

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In Buddhism

Theravada (major branch of Buddhism)

Source: Pali Kanon: Pali Proper Names

A river near Anuradhapura, probably identical with Kadamba (Sp.ii.474) (q.v.). The river was to the east of Anuradhapura. MA.ii.653.

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Theravāda is a major branch of Buddhism having the the Pali canon (tipitaka) as their canonical literature, which includes the vinaya-pitaka (monastic rules), the sutta-pitaka (Buddhist sermons) and the abhidhamma-pitaka (philosophy and psychology).

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India history and geography

Source: archive.org: Ceylon Branch of the Royal Asiatic Society 1963

Kalamba is another name of Kadamba: the name of a nadī (river) that existed in the ancient kingdom of Anurādhapura, Ceylon (Sri Lanka).—The Kadamba-nadī (present Malvatta Oya) is also called Kalamba and Kolom Oya and on its banks was the Kalambatittha or Galambatittha-vihāra existing in the 1st century: Vasabha (67-111) improved the vihāra and built a tank to irrigate 1,000 karisas.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Indian Epigraphical Glossary

Kalamba.—(EI 12), an arrow; ‘five’. Note: kalamba is defined in the “Indian epigraphical glossary” as it can be found on ancient inscriptions commonly written in Sanskrit, Prakrit or Dravidian languages.

India history book cover
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The history of India traces the identification of countries, villages, towns and other regions of India, as well as royal dynasties, rulers, tribes, local festivities and traditions and regional languages. Ancient India enjoyed religious freedom and encourages the path of Dharma, a concept common to Buddhism, Hinduism, and Jainism.

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Languages of India and abroad

Pali-English dictionary

[«previous next»] — Kalamba in Pali glossary
Source: Sutta: The Pali Text Society's Pali-English Dictionary

Kalamba, (nt.) (cp. Sk. kalamba menispermum calumba, kalambī convolvulus repens) N. of a certain herb or plant (Convolv. repens?); may be a bulb or radish J. IV, 46 (=tālakanda), cp. p. 371, 373 (where C explains by tāla-kanda; gloss BB however gives latā-tanta); VI, 578. See also kaḍamba & kaḷimba.

Pali book cover
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Pali is the language of the Tipiṭaka, which is the sacred canon of Theravāda Buddhism and contains much of the Buddha’s speech. Closeley related to Sanskrit, both languages are used interchangeably between religions.

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Marathi-English dictionary

Source: DDSA: The Molesworth Marathi and English Dictionary

kaḷamba (कळंब).—m (kadamba S) A plant, Nauclea Cadamba.

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kaḷambā (कळंबा) [or भा, bhā].—m (kēḷa) A young Plantain (as shooting from the roots of its parent, or as separated recently and planted); a Plantain off-shoot, sucker, or stole. v phuṭa. 2 The style or shaft of the cavēṇī or wild Plantain.

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Marathi is an Indo-European language having over 70 million native speakers people in (predominantly) Maharashtra India. Marathi, like many other Indo-Aryan languages, evolved from early forms of Prakrit, which itself is a subset of Sanskrit, one of the most ancient languages of the world.

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Sanskrit dictionary

Source: DDSA: The practical Sanskrit-English dictionary

Kalamba (कलम्ब).—

1) The stem or stalk (of a potherb).

2) The end or point, angle.

Derivable forms: kalambaḥ (कलम्बः).

See also (synonyms): kaḍamba, kalambī, kaḍambī.

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Kalamba (कलम्ब).—

1) An arrow.

2) The Kadamba tree.

Derivable forms: kalambaḥ (कलम्बः).

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Shabda-Sagara Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Kalamba (कलम्ब).—m.

(-mbaḥ) 1. An arrow. 2. The stalk of a potherb. 3. The Kadamba, (Nauclea cadamba:) see kadamba. n.

(-mbaṃ) Calambaroot, (Menispermum calumba.) f. (-mbī) or m. and f. (-mbaḥ-mbī) A kind of potherb, (Convolvulus repens, &c.) see kaḍambī. E. kaḍ to delight, ambac affix, la substituted for ḍa, fem. affix ṅīṣ; also kalambaka.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Monier-Williams Sanskrit-English Dictionary

1) Kalamba (कलम्ब):—[from kalama] m. the stalk of a pot-herb, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

2) [v.s. ...] Convolvulus repens, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

3) [v.s. ...] Nauclea Cadamba, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

4) [v.s. ...] an arrow, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

5) [from kalama] n. a panicle of flowers (?), [Caraka]

6) [v.s. ...] Calumba-root, [Horace H. Wilson] (cf. kaḍamba, kadamba.)

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Yates Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Kalamba (कलम्ब):—(mbaḥ) 1. m. An arrow; stalk of a potherb. (mbī) 3. f. A potherb.

[Sanskrit to German]

Kalamba in German

context information

Sanskrit, also spelled संस्कृतम् (saṃskṛtam), is an ancient language of India commonly seen as the grandmother of the Indo-European language family (even English!). Closely allied with Prakrit and Pali, Sanskrit is more exhaustive in both grammar and terms and has the most extensive collection of literature in the world, greatly surpassing its sister-languages Greek and Latin.

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