Kalamala, aka: Kālamāla, Kala-mala; 3 Definition(s)

Introduction

Kalamala means something in Hinduism, Sanskrit, Marathi. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

Languages of India and abroad

Marathi-English dictionary

kalamala (कलमल).—f Exhaustion, lassitude, extreme debility and disquietude:--as resulting from labor, fasting, biliousness &c. 2 (Or kaḷamaḷa) Qualmishness.

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kaḷamaḷa (कळमळ) [or ळी, ḷī].—f Nausea preceding vomiting; qualmishness.

(Source): DDSA: The Molesworth Marathi and English Dictionary

kalamala (कलमल).—f Exhaustion, lassitude. Qualmishness.

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kaḷamaḷa (कळमळ) [-ḷī, -ळी].—f Qualmishness.

(Source): DDSA: The Aryabhusan school dictionary, Marathi-English
context information

Marathi is an Indo-European language having over 70 million native speakers people in (predominantly) Maharashtra India. Marathi, like many other Indo-Aryan languages, evolved from early forms of Prakrit, which itself is a subset of Sanskrit, one of the most ancient languages of the world.

Sanskrit-English dictionary

Kālamāla (कालमाल).—a measure of time.

Derivable forms: kālamālam (कालमालम्).

Kālamāla is a Sanskrit compound consisting of the terms kāla and māla (माल).

(Source): DDSA: The practical Sanskrit-English dictionary
context information

Sanskrit, also spelled संस्कृतम् (saṃskṛtam), is an ancient language of India commonly seen as the grandmother of the Indo-European language family. Closely allied with Prakrit and Pali, Sanskrit is more exhaustive in both grammar and terms and has the most extensive collection of literature in the world, greatly surpassing its sister-languages Greek and Latin.

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