Kakola, Kākola: 14 definitions

Introduction:

Kakola means something in Buddhism, Pali, Hinduism, Sanskrit. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

In Hinduism

Dharmashastra (religious law)

Source: Prācyā: Animals and animal products as reflected in Smṛti texts

Kākola (काकोल) refers to the bird “Raven” (Corvus corax).—Birds have been described in several ancient Sanskrit texts that they have been treated elaborately by eminent scholars. These birds [viz., Kākola] are enumerated in almost several Smṛtis in context of specifying the expiations for killing them and their flesh being used as a dietary article to give satisfaction to the manes (Pitṛs) in Śrāddha rites. These are elaborated especially in the Manusmṛti, Parāśarasmṛti [chapter VI], Gautamasmṛti [chapter 23], Śātātapasmṛti [II.54-56], Uśānasmṛti [IX.10-IX.12], Yājñavalkyasmṛti [I.172-I.175], Viṣṇusmṛti [51.28-51.29], Uttarāṅgirasasmṛti [X.16].

Dharmashastra book cover
context information

Dharmashastra (धर्मशास्त्र, dharmaśāstra) contains the instructions (shastra) regarding religious conduct of livelihood (dharma), ceremonies, jurisprudence (study of law) and more. It is categorized as smriti, an important and authoritative selection of books dealing with the Hindu lifestyle.

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Ayurveda (science of life)

Veterinary Medicine (The study and treatment of Animals)

Source: Shodhganga: Portrayal of Animal Kingdom (Tiryaks) in Epics An Analytical study

Kākola (काकोल) refers to the Red-billed chough (Pyrrhocorax Pyrrhocorax), according to scientific texts such as the Mṛgapakṣiśāstra (Mriga-pakshi-shastra) or “the ancient Indian science of animals and birds” by Hamsadeva, containing the varieties and descriptions of the animals and birds seen in the Sanskrit Epics such as the Ramayana and Mahabharata.

Ayurveda book cover
context information

Āyurveda (आयुर्वेद, ayurveda) is a branch of Indian science dealing with medicine, herbalism, taxology, anatomy, surgery, alchemy and related topics. Traditional practice of Āyurveda in ancient India dates back to at least the first millenium BC. Literature is commonly written in Sanskrit using various poetic metres.

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In Buddhism

Theravada (major branch of Buddhism)

Source: Pali Kanon: Pali Proper Names

A hell; beings born there are dragged about by flocks of ravens, vultures and hawks, and eaten alive. J.vi.247.

context information

Theravāda is a major branch of Buddhism having the the Pali canon (tipitaka) as their canonical literature, which includes the vinaya-pitaka (monastic rules), the sutta-pitaka (Buddhist sermons) and the abhidhamma-pitaka (philosophy and psychology).

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Languages of India and abroad

Pali-English dictionary

Source: BuddhaSasana: Concise Pali-English Dictionary

kākola : (m.) a reven.

Source: Sutta: The Pali Text Society's Pali-English Dictionary

Kākola, and Kākoḷa (Onomat. The Lit. Sk. has the same form) a raven, esp. in his quality as bird of prey, feeding on carrion (cp. kāka) J. III, 246 (=vanakāka); V, 268, 270 (gijjha k° ā ca ayomukhā ... khādanti naraṃ kibbisakārinaṃ); VI, 566.

—gaṇā (pl.) flocks of ravens Sn. 675; VV5215 (=VvA. 227). (Page 202)

Pali book cover
context information

Pali is the language of the Tipiṭaka, which is the sacred canon of Theravāda Buddhism and contains much of the Buddha’s speech. Closeley related to Sanskrit, both languages are used interchangeably between religions.

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Sanskrit dictionary

Source: DDSA: The practical Sanskrit-English dictionary

Kākola (काकोल).—

1) A raven; Y.1.174; Mahābhārata (Bombay) 11.16.7.

2) A snake.

3) A boar.

4) A potter.

5) A division of the infernal regions or hell; महानरककाकोलं संजीवनमहापथम् (mahānarakakākolaṃ saṃjīvanamahāpatham) Y.3.223.

6) A poisonous substance.

-lī A drug prepared through अष्टवर्ग (aṣṭavarga).

Derivable forms: kākolaḥ (काकोलः).

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Shabda-Sagara Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Kākola (काकोल).—mn.

(-laḥ-laṃ) A poisonous substances of a black colour, or the colour of a raven, whence its name; possibly the berry of the Cocculus Indicus. n. (-la) A division of the infernal regions or hell. m.

(-laḥ) 1. A raven. 2. A potter. 3. A snake. 4. A boar. 5. A drug; as follows. f. (-lī) The name of a vegetable substance used in medicine, described as sweet and cooling, allaying fever, removing phlegm, &c.: it it said to be a root brought from Nepal or Morung. E. kāka to be unsteady, &c. and olac affix, deriv. irr.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Benfey Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Kākola (काकोल).— (cf. kāka), I. m. A raven, [Mānavadharmaśāstra] 5, 14. Ii. n. A division of the infernal regions, or hell, [Yājñavalkya, (ed. Stenzler.)] 3, 223.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Cappeller Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Kākola (काकोल).—[masculine] raven; [neuter] a cert. poison or hell.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Monier-Williams Sanskrit-English Dictionary

1) Kākola (काकोल):—m. a raven, [Manu-smṛti v, 14; Yājñavalkya i, 174 etc.] (cf. kāka and kākāla)

2) a boar, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

3) a snake, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

4) a potter (cf. kulāla), [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

5) the plant Kākolī, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

6) mn. a kind of poison, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

7) a poisonous substance of a black colour or the colour of a raven (perhaps the berry of the Cocculus indicus), [Horace H. Wilson]

8) n. a division of hell, [Yājñavalkya iii, 223.]

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Yates Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Kākola (काकोल):—[(laḥ-laṃ)] 1. m. n. A poisonous substance. m. A raven; snake; potter; boar. () 3. f. A medicinal substance. n. A hell.

[Sanskrit to German]

Kakola in German

context information

Sanskrit, also spelled संस्कृतम् (saṃskṛtam), is an ancient language of India commonly seen as the grandmother of the Indo-European language family (even English!). Closely allied with Prakrit and Pali, Sanskrit is more exhaustive in both grammar and terms and has the most extensive collection of literature in the world, greatly surpassing its sister-languages Greek and Latin.

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Kannada-English dictionary

Source: Alar: Kannada-English corpus

Kākōla (ಕಾಕೋಲ):—

1) [noun] a black bird of the genus Corvus; a crow.

2) [noun] a large glossy black species of crow; raven.

3) [noun] the quality or condition of not being friendly; unfriendliness; hostility.

4) [noun] a kind of poison.

5) [noun] a great forest fire; conflagration.

6) [noun] a division of the infernal region or hell.

7) [noun] one who makes articles of baked clay; a potter.

8) [noun] a snake.

9) [noun] a mature uncastrated male pig; a boar.

context information

Kannada is a Dravidian language (as opposed to the Indo-European language family) mainly spoken in the southwestern region of India.

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