Kakini, Kākiṇī, Kākinī, Kākiṇi: 14 definitions

Introduction

Introduction:

Kakini means something in Hinduism, Sanskrit, Jainism, Prakrit, the history of ancient India, Marathi. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

In Hinduism

Rasashastra (chemistry and alchemy)

Source: Wisdom Library: Rasa-śāstra

Kākinī (काकिनी):—One of the sixty-four Divyauṣadhi, which are powerful drugs for solidifying mercury (rasa), according to Rasaprakāśa-sudhākara (chapter 9).

Rasashastra book cover
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Rasashastra (रसशास्त्र, rasaśāstra) is an important branch of Ayurveda, specialising in chemical interactions with herbs, metals and minerals. Some texts combine yogic and tantric practices with various alchemical operations. The ultimate goal of Rasashastra is not only to preserve and prolong life, but also to bestow wealth upon humankind.

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Shaivism (Shaiva philosophy)

Source: Wisdom Library: Kubjikāmata-tantra

1) Kākinī (काकिनी):—Name of one of the six female deities (yoginīs) springing forth from the body of Kuleśvara, the central male deity of the Yoginīcakra (fourth of the five internal cakras), according to the kubjikāmata-tantra. She is also known as Kākī. In other tantric sources, such as the Kulārṇava-tantra, she is also identified as Kākinī (see below).

Kākinī is identified with the mantra-adhvan (on of the six paths, or adhvans) and relates to one eleven mantras. The fearful character of Kākinī is represented by her fondness for fat and muscle-fat (medavasālubdhā). She is situated in the Anāhata-cakra which is symbolic for her relation with one of the sixfold sites (ṣaṭpura). She is also related to tanutrāṇa (=kavaca), one of the six aṅgas.

2) Kākinī (काकिनी):—Name of one of the eight female deities (yoginīs) of the Yoginīcakra, according to tantric sources such as the Śrīmatottara-tantra and the Gorakṣa-saṃhita. In other tantric sources, such as the kubjikāmata-tantra, she is known by the same name (see anbove). She is also mentioned as a similarly positioned yoginī in the Kulārṇava-tantra and the Ṣaṭcakranirūpaṇa where she forms part of a group of six or seven such female deities. The male counterpart of Kākinī is the Bhairava named Krodha, who should be visualized mentally.

Kākinī (and the other eight yoginīs) arise forth from the body of the Bhairava named Saṃvarta, who is described as a furious deity (mahāraudra) with various fearsome characteristics. During worship, She is to be placed in a petal facing south-west. Kākinī has the head of a crow (kāka) according to the Śrīmatottara-tantra, or the head of a horse (haya) according to the Kulārṇava-tantra. She has eight arms and is greedy for flesh and liquor (piśitāsavalampaṭā). Her colour is black (kṛṣṇa).

Source: archive.org: Indian Historical Quarterly Vol. 7 (shaivism)

Kākinī (काकिनी).—The Ḍākinīs, Rākiṇīs, Lākinīs, [Kākinīs?] Śākinīs and Hākinīs are mentioned as the female energies (Śaktis) of the Tantrik deities respectively called Ḍāmeśvaranātha, Rāmeśvaranātha, Lāmeśvaranātha, Kākeśvaranātha, Śāmeśvaranātha, and Hāmeśvaranātha who together with their Śaktis, form mystic groups designated under the mnemonic ḍa ra la ka śa ha. The Lord of Lāmā is here called Lāmeśvara.

Shaivism book cover
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Shaiva (शैव, śaiva) or Shaivism (śaivism) represents a tradition of Hinduism worshiping Shiva as the supreme being. Closely related to Shaktism, Shaiva literature includes a range of scriptures, including Tantras, while the root of this tradition may be traced back to the ancient Vedas.

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In Jainism

General definition (in Jainism)

Source: Google Books: Jainism: An Indian Religion of Salvation

Kākiṇī (काकिणी, “dice”).—One of the fourteen gems (ratna) serving the Cakravartin;—The kākiṇī is a sort of very hollow mass in the form of a dice of a shining luminosity. This is used by a Cakravartī also to get light while entering a dark cave by grazing its walls and to remove the effect of poision etc.

Source: archive.org: Trisastisalakapurusacaritra

Kākiṇī (काकिणी) is the name of an object mentioned in chapter 1.4 [ādīśvara-caritra] of Hemacandra’s 11th century Triṣaṣṭiśalākāpuruṣacaritra (“lives of the 63 illustrious persons”): a Sanskrit epic poem narrating the history and legends of sixty-three important persons in Jainism.

Accordingly:

“[...] The King took the cowrie-jewel which weighed eight suvarṇas, was six-sided, twelve-edged, smooth-surfaced, provided with suitable bulk, weight, and height, always attended by one thousand Yakṣas, eight-cornered, destroyer of darkness for twelve yojanas, shaped like an anvil, with the brilliance of the sun and moon, four fingers (in each dimension)”.

Kākiṇī was a cube.—It is described also in Jambūdvīpaprajñapti 54, p. 226. Pravacanasāroddhāra 1213-17, p. 350. The descriptions agree with this one and add the facts that it was the shape of a goldsmith’s anvil, was made of gold, and could remove poison.

General definition book cover
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Jainism is an Indian religion of Dharma whose doctrine revolves around harmlessness (ahimsa) towards every living being. The two major branches (Digambara and Svetambara) of Jainism stimulate self-control (or, shramana, ‘self-reliance’) and spiritual development through a path of peace for the soul to progess to the ultimate goal.

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India history and geogprahy

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Indian Epigraphical Glossary

Kākinī.—(IE 8-6), also called kāka. (IE 8-6), a small land measure; cf. kānī. (IE 8-8; EI 1; CII 4), name of a small coin; equal to 20 cowrie-shells according to the Līlāvatī; (1/4) of a paṇa according to the Kṛtyakalpataru (Vyavahāra-kāṇḍa, ed. K. V. Ranga- swami Aiyangar, p. 125). Note: kākinī is defined in the “Indian epigraphical glossary” as it can be found on ancient inscriptions commonly written in Sanskrit, Prakrit or Dravidian languages.

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Kakinī.—equal to 20 cowrie-shells according to the Līlāvatī; (1/4) of a paṇa; same as bud8ī. Cf. gaṇḍā Note: kakinī is defined in the “Indian epigraphical glossary” as it can be found on ancient inscriptions commonly written in Sanskrit, Prakrit or Dravidian languages.

India history book cover
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The history of India traces the identification of countries, villages, towns and other regions of India, as well as royal dynasties, rulers, tribes, local festivities and traditions and regional languages. Ancient India enjoyed religious freedom and encourages the path of Dharma, a concept common to Buddhism, Hinduism, and Jainism.

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Languages of India and abroad

Marathi-English dictionary

Source: DDSA: The Molesworth Marathi and English Dictionary

kākiṇī (काकिणी).—f S A weight of shells equal to 20 cowries. 2 A cowrie. 3 The fourth part of a daṇḍa or pole; a cubit.

context information

Marathi is an Indo-European language having over 70 million native speakers people in (predominantly) Maharashtra India. Marathi, like many other Indo-Aryan languages, evolved from early forms of Prakrit, which itself is a subset of Sanskrit, one of the most ancient languages of the world.

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Sanskrit dictionary

Source: DDSA: The practical Sanskrit-English dictionary

Kākiṇi (काकिणि).—

1) A shell or cowrie used as a coin.

2) A sum of money equal to 2 cowries or to a quarter of a Paṇa. एका स्निग्धाः काकिणिना सद्यः सर्वेऽरयः कृताः (ekā snigdhāḥ kākiṇinā sadyaḥ sarve'rayaḥ kṛtāḥ) Bhāg.11.23.2.

3) A weight equal to a quarter of a Māṣa.

4) A part of a measure.

5) The beam of a balance.

6) A cubit.

7) A kind of jewel.

See also (synonyms): kākiṇikā, kākaṇī.

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Kākinī (काकिनी).—

1) A small coin (equal to twenty cowries), quarter of a Paṇa q. v.

2) A part of a measure.

3) cowrie; यः काकिनीमप्यपथप्रपन्नां समुद्धरेन्निष्कसहस्रतुल्याम् (yaḥ kākinīmapyapathaprapannāṃ samuddharenniṣkasahasratulyām) H.3.123. न हि काकिन्यां नष्टायां तदन्वेषणं कार्षापणेन क्रियते (na hi kākinyāṃ naṣṭāyāṃ tadanveṣaṇaṃ kārṣāpaṇena kriyate) | ŚB. on Ms.4.3.39.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Shabda-Sagara Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Kākiṇī (काकिणी).—f. (-ṇī) 1. A cubit, the forth part of a Danda or short pole. 2. The quarter of a Pana, a weight or a tale of shells equal to twenty Cowries. 3. A quarter of a Masha, a weight of silver or gold. 4. A Retti or small seed used as a weight. 5. A Cowri or shell used as a coin. E. kaka to be unsteady, lyuṭ and ṅīp affixes; deriv. irr.; also the dental na being substituted, kākinī.

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Kākinī (काकिनी).—f. (-nī) See the preceding.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Benfey Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Kākiṇī (काकिणी).—and kākinī kākinī (perhaps kāka + in + ī), f. A small coin, a quarter of a Paṇa, [Pañcatantra] ii. [distich] 70.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Cappeller Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Kākiṇī (काकिणी).—[feminine] a cert. small coin.

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Kākinī (काकिनी).—[feminine] a cert. small coin.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Monier-Williams Sanskrit-English Dictionary

1) Kākiṇi (काकिणि):—m. = kākiṇī, [Bhāgavata-purāṇa xi, 23, 20.]

2) Kākiṇī (काकिणी):—[from kākiṇi] f. a small coin or a small sum of money equal to twenty Kapardas or cowries, or to a quarter of a Paṇa, [Pañcatantra; Daśakumāra-carita]

3) [v.s. ...] a seed of the Abrus precatorius used as a weight, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

4) [v.s. ...] the shell Cypraea moneta or a cowrie used as a coin, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

5) [v.s. ...] a cubit, the fourth part of a Daṇḍa or short pole, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

6) [v.s. ...] a Daṇḍa, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

7) [v.s. ...] a part of a measure (unmānasyāṃśaka), [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

8) Kākinī (काकिनी):—[from kākiṇi] f. the fourth part of a Paṇa, [Hitopadeśa]

9) [v.s. ...] a quarter of a Māna, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

10) [v.s. ...] the seed Abrus precatorius, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

11) [v.s. ...] the shell Cypraea moneta, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

12) [v.s. ...] a kind of Svarabhakti, Māṇḍūkī Śikṣā ix, 13

13) [v.s. ...] Name of a goddess.

context information

Sanskrit, also spelled संस्कृतम् (saṃskṛtam), is an ancient language of India commonly seen as the grandmother of the Indo-European language family (even English!). Closely allied with Prakrit and Pali, Sanskrit is more exhaustive in both grammar and terms and has the most extensive collection of literature in the world, greatly surpassing its sister-languages Greek and Latin.

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